From the monthly archives: September 2012

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for October 1, 2012. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

The Creative Mindset

Cynthia Morris presents Your Imperfection is Your Gateway to Your Happiness posted at Original Impulse.

Sharing Our Work

Eula McLeod presents The Summer of ‘With’ posted at View from the Wine Press.

Writing Quote of the Week

The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it ­honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter. -Neil Gaiman

Writing Tips and Prompts

Charlie Jane Anders presents How to Write an Omniscient Narrator If You’re Not Actually Omniscient Yourself posted at io9.

C.S. Lakin presents What’s Your Motif? posted at Live Write Thrive.

Julie Duffy presents Climbing Mt. Revision One Step at a Time posted at Story a Day.

Gabriela Pereira presents Villains vs. Antagonists posted at DIY MFA.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Death. Let’s kill some characters this week!

Journal Writing

Joe Petrowsky presents The Power and Importance of Journal Writing posted at Active Rain.

The Business of Creativity

Jason Boog presents New Twitter Profile Tips for Writers posted at MediaBistro.

Derek Pankaew presents Learn by Example: 20 Lessons from 3 Successful Blogs posted at Concentrix.

Jeff Goins presents One Sure Sign You’re a Professional posted at Jeff Goins Writer.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

Dodged a bullet?

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo by Vic on Flickr.

One eye cat

“About the accident itself I can say very little.” -Tom McCarthy, Remainder

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene where a character has an accident.

Journaling Prompt: Write about an accident you’ve had recently.

Art Prompt: Accident

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about accidents and their significance.

Photo Credit: ShironekoEuro on Flickr

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reliquary: A container to hold or display religious relics.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story, poem or haiku using the word “reliquary.”

Journaling Prompt: Write about an object you own that has religious or spiritual significance for you. Where do you keep it?

Art Prompt: Reliquary

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about a specific reliquary and its history.

Photo Credit: mararie on Flickr

Lumination

… perhaps there is truth in dreams. Could I have seen… I couldn’t have seen. Dreams occlude and obfuscate—smoke and candlelight, paper lanterns winking in the night with a knowing nod to the masquerade. -Jonathan Wood, Début-de-siècle (free to read online at Fantasy Magazine)

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene about a character struggling with the boundaries between dreams and reality.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a dream that seemed very real.

Art Prompt: Dream

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about a dream that changed a life. Examples, Joseph in the Bible, dreams recounted by Jung or Freud in their writings, or a dream that you had that impacted your life.

Photo Credit: Tracy Hunter on Flickr

A singular fatality occurred on Wednesday night at a public house in Soho, London. Some men were in the billiard-room when one of them attempted to get a billiard-ball into his mouth. This feat he had previously accomplished and had successfully removed the ball. This time, however, he failed to extract it, and it became fixed in his throat. A cab was immediately fetched, but while being removed to the hospital the unfortunate fellow expired. –Yorkshire Evening Post, November 3rd, 1893

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene where a character dies in an improbable manner.

Journaling Prompt: What is the craziest accident you’ve ever had?

Art Prompt: Biting off more than you can chew

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about a Darwin award-winning incident.

Photo Credit: anomalous4 on Flickr

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As a class, gunfighters did not conform to the stereotyped image of the motion picures. Generations of Western fans have seen them portrayed as cowboys, gamblers and occa­sionally in the guise of a frontier scout com­plete with buckskins. But the cowboy image dominates. From the earliest appearance of the Western film in 1903, the dress and manner of the gunfighter has been reflected in the image of the cowboy. The huge sombrero, neckerchief, double or single gunbelt, knee high boots (worn with pants tucked in or pulled down over them), and jingling spurs, all served to create a false image of the man behind the gun. In reality, most gunfighters dressed normally according to the current fashions of the time, and would probably be missed in a crowd. Only when they openly carried pistols would they command much attention. In fact, the editor of the Kansas City, Mo. Journal on 15 November 1881 made a point of describing the ‘man-killer’ or ‘civilizer’ that today we call the gunfighter:

The gentleman who has ‘killed his man’ is by no means a rara avis … He is met daily on Main street, and is the busiest of the busy throng. He may be seen on change, and in the congregations of the most aristocratic churches. He resides on ‘Quality hill’, or perhaps on the East Side . . . This ubiquitous individual may be seen almost anywhere. He may be found behind the bar in a Main street saloon; he may be seen by an admiring audience doing the pedestal clog at a variety theatre; his special forte may be driving a cab, or he may be behind the rosewood counters of a bank … He is usually quiet in demeanor, sober … [and] … he may take a drink occasionally, but seldom gets drunk … He is quiet — fatally quiet.. . Your gentleman who has dropped his man is, therefore, no uncommon individual. . . -Joseph G. Rosa, Age of the Gunfighter: Men and Weapons on the Frontier, 1840-1900

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or poem about a gunfighter.

Journaling Prompt: Which is scarier to you and why: the type of gunfighter you see in the movies or one that blends in with ordinary people.

Art Prompt: Gunfighter

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about a famous gunfighter’s life story.

Photo Credit: Cain and Todd Benson on Flickr

The shark

A paper published this month in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology suggests that the more money you have, the more likely it is that you will turn to your possessions, rather than other people, for comfort during chaotic situations. Five different experiments were conducted in which subjects, primed with situations that gave them a sense of helplessness, were asked to answer a series of questions and/or perform a number of tasks. In one example, participants were offered a scenario that involved their leaving their support networks to move to a new job with a better salary. In uncertain situations, poorer people preferred to stick close to home, whereas richer people were fine with taking the job…The drastic differences between the two groups in their coping responses to turmoil may account for increased polarization in times of crisis. –Kecia Lynn

Fiction Writing Prompt: To what or whom would your protagonist turn in a chaotic time? Why?

Journaling Prompt: Where do you find comfort in chaotic times?

Art Prompt: Finding Comfort

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about coping skills for people going through life challenges.

Photo Credit: Miguel Pires da Rosa on Flickr

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for March 11, 2012. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

Sharing Our Work

Emi Bauer presents My Friend’s Headache posted at Confessions of an Incompetent Blogger.

Eula McLeod presents An Ode to Odah posted at View from the Wine Press

Liz Shaw presents Book Review: Ramblefoot by Ken Kaufman posted at Liz Andra Shaw.

Writing Quote of the Week

The way to write a book is to actually write a book. A pen is useful, typing is also good. Keep putting words on the page. -Anne Enright

Writing Tips and Prompts

CS Lakin presents Getting to the Core of Your Characters posted at Live Write Thrive.

Lisa Wilson Hall presents What Makes a Hero posted at The Candid Writer.

Creativity Boosts

Lauren Davis presents What happens when you remove one letter from a movie title? How about Jurassic Ark? posted at io9.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Writing Love Scenes. They’ve brought in Shanna Germaine, writer and editor of erotica, to answer the questions. Take a few minutes to listen – it’s excellent!

Journal Writing

Elaine Cougler presents 7 Reasons for Writers to Journal posted at On Becoming a Wordsmith.

Spam of the Week

A person necessarily help to make critically posts I would state. That is the very first time I frequented your web page and up to now? I surprised with the analysis you made to make this particular publish amazing. Excellent task!

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

anti botox brigade

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo by emdot on Flickr.