From the monthly archives: December 2012

Metal Men: Gold (3/7)

It’s hard to believe you’d have an economy at all if you gave pink slips to more than half the labor force. But that—in slow motion—is what the industrial revolution did to the workforce of the early 19th century. Two hundred years ago, 70 percent of American workers lived on the farm. Today automation has eliminated all but 1 percent of their jobs, replacing them (and their work animals) with machines. But the displaced workers did not sit idle. Instead, automation created hundreds of millions of jobs in entirely new fields. Those who once farmed were now manning the legions of factories that churned out farm equipment, cars, and other industrial products. Since then, wave upon wave of new occupations have arrived—appliance repairman, offset printer, food chemist, photographer, web designer—each building on previous automation. Today, the vast majority of us are doing jobs that no farmer from the 1800s could have imagined.

It may be hard to believe, but before the end of this century, 70 percent of today’s occupations will likewise be replaced by automation. Yes, dear reader, even you will have your job taken away by machines. In other words, robot replacement is just a matter of time. This upheaval is being led by a second wave of automation, one that is centered on artificial cognition, cheap sensors, machine learning, and distributed smarts. This deep automation will touch all jobs, from manual labor to knowledge work.-Kevin Kelly, Wired

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about someone whose job is taken over by a robot.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your job and speculate on what parts of it could be automated.

Art Prompt: Robot Workforce

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about the jobs of future and the skills people should be developing now to ensure their continued employment.

Photo Credit: JD Hancock on Flickr

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for December 30, 2012. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

Responses to Writing Reader Prompts

Debra Mauldin responded with a haiku to The Writing Reader Prompt #517 Word of the Week – Imperious.

The Creative Mindset

Jim Woods presents How to Get Those Creative Juices Flowing posted at Jeff Goins Writer.

Sharing Our Work

Eula McLeod presents Ensenada Madonna posted at View from the Wine Press.

J.T. Ellison presents Victimizing Our Heroines posted at Criminal Element.

Writing Quote of the Week

“Without words, without writing and without books there would be no history, there could be no concept of humanity.” -Herman Hesse

Writing Tips and Prompts

Adair Lara presents 7 Ways to Perfect Your Writing “Tone” posted at Writer’s Digest.

Edith presents Keeping A WRITER’S DIARY posted at In a Room of My Own.

Chrys Fey presents To Epilogue or Not to Epilogue posted at Write with Fey.

CJ Lakin presents The Inevitable Ending You Know Is Coming posted at Live Write Thrive.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Secret History.

Visual Arts

Julie Ann Shahin presents Art Journaling 102: Technique Feature – Mixing Patterned Papers posted at Tangie Baxter Studio.

The Business of Creativity

Writer’s Relief presents When And How To Follow Up With (Or Nudge) A Literary Agent About Your Book Query posted at Writer’s Relief.

Gabriela Pereira presents Branding Basics from ThrillerfFest posted at DIY MFA.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

Shanghai Low

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo by Fraser Mummery on Flickr.

gossip

“I’ve heard it said girls can’t keep secrets.” -Juliet Marillier, Wildwood Dancing

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story, scene or poem inspired by the first line of the week.

Journaling Prompt: How good are you at keeping secrets?

Art Prompt: It’s a Secret

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about keeping secrets – when is it healthy and when should secrets be exposed?

Photo Credit: zoetnet on Flickr

besmirch v. [with obj.]
1 damage (someone’s reputation): he had besmirched the good name of his family.
2 LITERARY make (something) dirty or discoloured: the ground was besmirched with blood.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about someone whose reputation is besmirched.

Journaling Prompt: Has your reputation ever been besmirched? Write about how that felt.

Art Prompt: Besmirch

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about character and reputation using the word of the week.

Photo Credit: irina slutsky on Flickr

Escape

John Maynard Keynes said: “The difficulty lies not so much in developing new ideas as in escaping from old ones.” –Leading at a Higher Level by Ken Blanchard

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a character that is trying to escape from an old idea that is strangling him or society.

Journaling Prompt: Write about an idea that it’s time for you to let go of.

Art Prompt: Escaping Ideas

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Persuade your audience that it is time to let go of an old set of beliefs in order to achieve a new way of living.

Photo Credit: Metaphox on Flickr

The Ruling Class

“People like to think they are inherently moral creatures — you either have character or you don’t. But our studies show that the same person may make a completely different decision based on what hat they may be wearing at the time, often without even realizing it.”
Leavitt, an assistant professor of management in the College of Business at OSU, is an expert on non-conscious decision making and business ethics. He studies how people make decisions and moral judgments, often based on non-conscious cues.
…”What we consider to be moral sometimes depends on what constituency we are answering to at that moment,” Leavitt said. “For a physician, a human life is priceless. But if that same physician is a managed-care administrator, some degree of moral flexibility becomes necessary to meet their obligations to stockholders.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Work on a character sketch which shows the way that situation affects ethics.

Journaling Prompt: Are you a different person at work than you are around your friends or your family? Write about your different personalities.

Art Prompt: Situational Ethics

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about ethics and how our choices are influenced by the situation in which we find ourselves.

Photo Credit: Alex E. Proimos on Flickr

Old books

Seeing the books, Diana felt a flash of recognition. From these volumes, she had gained her love of reading, her fascination with the written word. She pulled out each book individually, thumbing through the pages, glancing at the familiar illustrations, remembering her favorite stories, wishing Davy knew them the way she did. -J.A. Jance, Hour of the Hunter

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write about a character who shares his or her love of reading with another person.

Journaling Prompt: What are your favorite books and why?

Art Prompt: Books

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Persuade your audience of the importance of being life-long learners.

Photo Credit: terryballard on Flickr

smiles all around

Human emotions are highly contagious. Seeing others’ emotional expressions such as smiles triggers often the corresponding emotional response in the observer. Such synchronization of emotional states across individuals may support social interaction: When all group members share a common emotional state, their brains and bodies process the environment in a similar fashion. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene where someone’s emotions become contagious and affects other people.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your experiences sharing smiles with strangers.

Art Prompt: Contagious emotions

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about how emotions are contagious and challenge your audience to use this information to change their environment.

Photo Credit: notsogoodphotography on Flickr

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for December 23, 2012. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

The Creative Mindset

Universiteit Leiden presents Meditation Makes You More Creative posted at Science Daily.

Sharing Our Work

Eula McLeod presents Up in Flames posted at View from the Wine Press.

Emi Bauer presents Money Well Spent posted at Confessions of an Incompetent Blogger.

Writing Quote of the Week

I believe in having a structured approach. My philosophy is that I can sit down at any time with a problem, and if I sit there and don’t allow my mind to have distractions — no phone, no music, no televi­sion — my mind will eventually start to work on it on its own. It’s like a biosphere situation. I isolate myself — ’cause this is my ‘sit’ time. -Jerry Seinfeld

Writing Tips and Prompts

Cathy presents Innocence abroad: you can’t publish an omelette without breaking a few probabilities posted at Write a Novel in 10 Minutes Flat.

Roz Morris presents How to add jeopardy to your story before the main conflict starts posted at Nail Your Novel.

Nancy Parker presents 5 Tips for Developing Supporting Characters posted at The Other Side of the Story.

Vikki presents Editing A Novel – Tips From Della Galton posted at The View Outside.

Chrys Fey presents Review Your Story; The Finale is Coming posted at Write with Fey.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is another Microcasting episode where the cast takes listener questions.

Visual Arts

Katie presents Sawdust Art Festival posted at The Golden Fox Girl

Journal Writing

Quinn presents What Else Do I Write in My Journal? posted at QuinnCreative.

The Business of Creativity

Gabriela Pereira presents Prompt: Make an Editorial Calendar for Your Blog posted at DIY MFA.

Jeff Goins presents What You Write About Doesn’t Matter as Much as You Think posted at Jeff Goins Writer.

John Scalzi presents Writer or Spambot? posted at Whatever.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!