From the monthly archives: August 2015

CLXXXIX - the hermitage

English and German nobles thought no estate was complete without a hermitage. Not an authentic one, of course, but one they built and then hired a “hermit” to live in it. The hired hermit was basically an actor whose role required poor grooming, carrying heavy books, and preaching to guests.

In addition to hermits, 18th century rich people also tended to build completely ornamental buildings. The height of folly would definitely be follies of ruins. Fake ruins built on estates to symbolize desired virtues of other times and places. –The 10 Weirdest Things That People Once Used As Status Symbols by Katharine Trendacosta

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set in a hermitage.

Journaling Prompt: If you could build a building to use as a retreat, what would it look like?

Art Prompt: Hermitage

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about strange status symbols.

Photo Credit: Juan Lois on Flickr

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for August 28, 2015. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

The Creative Mindset

Maria Popova presents The Workhorse and the Butterfly: Ann Patchett on Writing and Why Self-Forgiveness Is the Most Important Ingredient of Great Art posted at Brain Pickings.

Jon presents Excuses are like rabbits posted at Jon Acuff.

Lee Hammond presents Just One of Those Days, Confronting Artist’s Block posted at Artists Network.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

Mark Gardner presents The Nightmare in Blue in response to Prompt #1473 Word of the Week – Jovial.

Sharing Our Work

Liz presents This is Real Life #17 posted at Liz Andra Shaw.

Writing Quote of the Week

If you do not breathe through writing, if you do not cry out in writing, or sing in writing, then don't write, because our culture has no use for it. -Anais Nin

Writing Tips

Amanda Patterson presents Why First Time Authors Don’t Write The Books They Want To Read posted at Writers Write.

Melissa Donovan presents Exploring Nonfiction Genres for Creative Writing posted at Writing Forward.

Lizzy Davey presents Why You Should Write With All the Senses… Except Sight posted at The Write Practice.

Jackie Johansen presents How to Create a Strong Emotional Response in Your Readers posted at Live Write Thrive.

Harrison Demchick presents Missed Connections: How Characterization Creates Chemistry posted at Romance University.

Janice Hardy presents Small Changes in Your Writing Process Can Lead to Big Results posted at Fiction University.

KM Weiland presents Should All Your Minor Characters Have Arcs? posted at Helping Writers Become Authors.

Nina Munteanu presents How Are You Telling Your Story?…Part 2: Voice and Narration posted at Amazing Stories.

Kimberly Brock presents The Jackass in My Head: Barnyard Lessons From a Rustic Writer’s Retreat posted at Writers in the Storm.

Nancy J. Cohen presents Religion in Mysteries posted at Kill Zone.

Charlie Jane Anders presents How To Raise The Stakes In Your Story Without Wrecking Your Characters posted at io9.

Mark Nichol presents 7 Tips for Writing a Film Review posted at Daily Writing Tips.

Blogging

Dia T presents How Planning Helps Your Blogging posted at Daily Blog Tips.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Why Should My Characters Fail Spectacularly?.

This week’s podcast at Goins Writer is all about Courage and the Creative Pursuit.

Videos

Visual Arts

Christopher Jobson presents Sean Edward Whelan’s Architectural People posted at This is Colossal.

The Business of Creativity

Brian DeLeonard presents How to Market Your Self-Published Book posted at Mythic Scribes.

Cathy Yardley presents How To Create A Promotion Plan “Story” posted at Writer Unboxed.

ABI presents Tips for Taking Art Commissions posted at Arts Business Institute.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

Stags

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Andi Campbell-Jones on Flickr

soft shock

Keineth Randolph’s world seemed suddenly to be turning upside down! –Keineth by Jane Abbott

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when you felt like the world was turning upside down.

Art Prompt: Upside down

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about a time when your world turned upside down.

Photo Credit: lauren rushing on Flickr

Jovial :-)

jovial adj

1. Merry; joyous; jolly; characterized by mirth or jollity.


Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: When do you feel jovial?

Art Prompt: Jovial

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: uniccus on Flickr

viking 1

The last ten years of the eighth century were very bad ones for Ireland. Then for the first time the black Viking ships were to be seen sweeping shore-wards over the low grey waves of the Irish Channel, laden with Picts, Danes, and Norsemen, “people,” says an old historian, “from their very cradles dissentious, Land Leapers, merciless, soure, and hardie.” They descended upon Ireland like locusts, and where-ever they came ruin, misery, and disaster followed. –The Story of Ireland by Emily Lawless

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a Viking raid on 8th century Ireland.

Journaling Prompt: Who or what invades your life? How do you defend yourself?

Art Prompt: Viking raid

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of Viking invasions of Ireland and how that legacy is reflected in today’s Celtic culture.

Photo Credit: Katherine on Flickr

Suicide

Suicide is the third most common cause of death among American adolescents, and poisoning is the leading method of attempted suicide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Unlike more violent methods, survival following self-poisoning is common, providing an opportunity to prevent subsequent suicide. However, little progress has been made in suicide prevention in the past 50 years. In fact, hospital admission rates for suicidal ideation and attempts by American children have more than doubled in the past decade…

Factors associated with suicide included recurrent self-poisoning episodes, being male and psychiatric care in the preceding year. Adolescents hospitalized for self-poisoning were also more likely to die from accidents than youths in the general population. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a suicide attempt.

Journaling Prompt: Have you ever considered suicide? What do you feel about suicide?

Art Prompt: Suicide attempt

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Teach your audience the signs that someone may be considering suicide, and give them strategies for handling the situation.

Photo Credit: Jason Kuffer on Flickr

Le Jour ni l’Heure 0452 : William Hole, 1846-1917, Arrivée, 1068, de Marguerite de Wessex, future reine d'Écosse et sainte Marguerite, 1898, Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Édimbourg, samedi 14 avril 2012,12:43:56

Men deprived of female company quickly became fearsome creatures, and Trevor believed you could argue that civilization was in fact the invention of women, or at least the invention of the men who wanted to please them. If it were not for the ladies, Trevor often proclaimed, especially after a few beers, humanity would doubtlessly still be roaming the forests in animal skins. –City of Darkness by Kim Wright

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story, poem or haiku about an all-male civilization gone bad.

Journaling Prompt: Who creates the civilization in your family?

Art Prompt: Men as Fearsome Creatures or Women as Creators of Civilization

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about men gone wild

Photo Credit: Renaud Camus on Flickr

Untitled

The Code Of Boys was a code of silence. Boys would do terrible things to each other, but you didn’t want to be a snitch, so you didn’t go to adults about it.

In the sixties and early seventies there was a pretty extreme laissez-faire style of parenting, at least in Southern California. Kids were left to take care of themselves without hovering parents. I was hitchhiking everywhere by the time I was 14, traveling the coast looking for waves.

I think of it as an old fashioned American boyhood from Tom Sawyer onward, but it reached a kind of extreme when I was an adolescent. There was a lot of ambient violence. I liked to box. I’d invite boys home from school, put on the gloves, and we’d just beat each other senseless right in front of our house. Nobody thought anything of it. That’s what boys do: they box. –Bill Finnegan

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story involving the Code of Boys. 

Journaling Prompt: What secrets did you keep from your parents when you were a teen?

Art Prompt: The Code of Boys

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story with a moral about something you kept secret from your parents as a teen.

Photo Credit: Eugene H. White on Flickr

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for August 22, 2015. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

The Creative Mindset

Maria Popova presents Grandmother’s Glass Eye: Elizabeth Bishop on How Poetry Pretends Life into Reality posted at Brain Pickings.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

Mark Gardner presents Cacophony of Crows in response to Prompt #1466 Word of the Week – Salubrious.

Sharing Our Work

Liz presents This is Real Life #16 posted at Liz Andra Shaw.

Creativity Quote of the Week

When the creative impulse sweeps over you, grab it. You grab it and honor it and use it, because momentum is a rare gift. ~Justina Chen

Writing Tips

Mark Nichol presents In Writing, Tone Is the Author’s Attitude posted at Daily Writing Tips.

Clair de Boer presents Why Expressive Writing is Worth the Challenge posted at The Gift of Writing.

Melissa Donovan presents 12 Character Writing Tips for Fiction Writers posted at Writing Forward.

Emily Wenstrom presents What I’ve Learned About Writing From Comic Books posted at The Write Practice.

Jael McHenry presents Learning to Love the Synopsis posted at Writer Unboxed.

CS Lakin presents The Perils of Purple Prose posted at Live Write Thrive.

Kristina Knight presents The Power of 15 Minutes posted at Romance University.

Joyce Scarbrough presents Writing Fight Scenes Without Melodrama posted at Fiction University.

Liberty Speidel presents How to Keep Writing Even When Life Is Tough—3 Tips posted at Helping Writers Become Authors.

Philip Overby presents Keeping Readers Reading (And Yourself Writing) posted at Mythic Scribes.

James Chartrand presents Silence Your Inner Critic: How to Defeat Your Writing Demons posted at The Write Life.

Mooderino presents Maximising Want-To-Know Value posted at Moody Writing.

Jody presents 4 Steps That Can Keep Writers From Dismal Failure posted at Jody Hedlund.

Blogging

Bamboo Forest presents How to Take Your Writing to The Next Level posted at Daily Blog Tips.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Polytheism in Fiction, with Marie Brennan.

This week’s podcast at The Author Biz is all about The Importance of Persistence with Jordan Rosenfeld.

Visual Arts

Christopher Jobson presents The Storybook Fantasies of Dara Scully posted at This is Colossal.

The Business of Creativity

Michael J. Sullivan presents Things Change and Yet Remarkably Remain the Same posted at Amazing Stories.

Kelly Marone presents 30 Ultimately Effective Social Media Tools For Writers posted at Writers Write.

Chuck Sambuchino presents 4 Signs of an Unhealthy Agent-Author Relationship posted at Writers in the Storm.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!