From the monthly archives: February 2016

knight in shining armour.

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!
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Photo Credit: Saffron Blaze on Wikimedia

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for February 28, 2016. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

SR Carson responded to Prompt #978 First Line of the Week – Dale Ivan Smith in the comments.

Linda Ann Nickerson presents To marry Annette and win it yet in response to Prompt #1564 Word of the Week – Winsome.

Stephanie MacWilliams presents {Writing} The Bonfire of The Vanities in response to Prompt #1643 Bonfire of the Vanities.

Pandamoniumcat presents There are Dolls and Then There are Dolls in response to Prompt #1644 Deadbeat Dolls.

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Sharing Our Work

Hema presents Flash Fiction: Parallel Universes posted at Hema’s Mixed Bag.

Liz presents This is Real Life #38 posted at Liz Andra Shaw.

Creativity Quote of the Week

It is not the right angle that attracts me, Nor the hard, inflexible straight line, man-made. What attracts me are free and sensual curves. The curves in my country’s mountains, In the sinuous flow of its rivers, In the beloved woman’s body. ~ Oscar Niemeyer

Writing Tips

CS Lakin presents The 12 Fatal Flaws of Fiction Writing and How You Can Correct Them posted at Live Write Thrive.

Rachel Starr Thomson presents The Fatal Flaw in Weak Descriptions posted at Jane Friedman.

Angela Ackerman presents The Fatal Flaw of Underwriting posted at Writers Helping Writers.

Rachelle Rea presents 3 Tricks to Motivated Writing Sessions posted at Go Teen Writers.

Ali Hale presents Four Powerful Ways to Bring Your Writing Goals Closer posted at Daily Writing Tips.

Amanda Patterson presents Five Simple Ways To Describe Characters posted at Writers Write.

Lauren Monroe presents Fieldwork That Fortifies Your Novel posted at Romance University.

Sarah Francis Hardy presents Picture Book Plotting 101 posted at Fiction University.

Melissa Donovan presents The Power of Narrative Writing posted at Writing Forward.

Jody presents 8 Tips For Picking Meaningful Character Names posted at Jody Hedlund.

Charlie Jane Anders presents The Single Most Important Thing You Can Do To Make Your Writing More Awesome posted at io9.

Blogging

Martyn Chamberlin presents Why You Aren’t Writing to Your Audience posted at Daily Blog Tips.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Layering The Elemental Genres.

This week’s podcast at The Creative Penn is all about Motivation For Creative People With Mark McGuinness.

This week’s podcast at Upgrade Your Story is all about Interview with Author and VP Jesse James Freeman.

Videos

Visual Arts

Christopher Jobson presents Stacked Book Sculptures by Jonathan Callan posted at This is Colossal.

Journaling

Debra presents I Am confident: a journal writing exercise posted at The Warm Milk Journal.

The Business of Creativity

Chris Well presents What You Need to Know About Publicity Before You Self-Publish posted at The Write Life.

Mandy Gardner presents Tax Filing Tips for Freelance Bloggers in the US, UK and Canada posted at Be a Freelance Blogger.

Michael J. Sullivan presents We All Start From the Same Place posted at Amazing Stories.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

Navigating by the stars

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

winter street scene

The winter the bus drivers went on strike I was twenty-three years old and living on the edge of the city in a neighborhood that was on the verge of becoming a ghetto. –Brief Encounters With the Enemy by Saïd Sayrafiezadeh

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react when your normal means of transportation is not available?

Art Prompt: Transportation

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience your opinion of strikes.

Photo Credit: Russell James Smith on Flickr

bathyscaphe

bathyscaphe n
1. A self-propelled deep-sea diving submersible for exploring the ocean depths, consisting of a crew cabin similar to a bathysphere suspended below a float filled with a buoyant liquid such as petrol.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: If you could explore undersea, what would you be most interested in seeing?

Art Prompt: Bathyscaphe

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

Wolf Pack

All stories are about wolves. All worth repeating, that is. Anything else is sentimental drivel. …Think about it. There’s escaping from the wolves, fighting the wolves, capturing the wolves, taming the wolves. Being thrown to the wolves, or throwing others to the wolves so the wolves will eat them instead of you. Running with the wolf pack. Turning into a wolf. Best of all, turning into the head wolf. No other decent stories exist. –The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story involving wolves.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about wolves? Should they be reintroduced into wilderness areas or not?

Art Prompt: Wolves

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about why the human psyche is drawn to wolves and stories about wolves.

Photo Credit: Debs on Flickr

two faces

When you look at the subject of aggression there is no more important factor than gender. Something like 90 percent of the people in prison for violent crimes are men. Men have different brains than women, which comes from our different roles during evolution, when the brain was formed. Men had a role of being aggressive, which makes no sense for a woman because a woman was not endowed with the physical strength of a man, who probably outweighs her. But although 90 percent of those in jail are men, 90 percent of people who have been awarded medals by the Carnegie Institute for heroism are also men. In a quarter of those cases, these are men who gave up their lives and died in an instant to do something heroic, often for a stranger. So the rage circuit is good and bad. It’s a double-edged sword…

We have these circuits because we need them. Most of the time, they work amazingly well. We don’t call it snapping unless the result of this aggressive response is inappropriate. When it works as intended we call it quick thinking or, in many cases, heroic. We have these circuits to protect ourselves, our family unit, or society. –Simon Worrall

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a person who chooses to use their rage toward being hero.

Journaling Prompt: How do you deal with your anger?

Art Prompt: The Double-Edged Sword of Rage

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the rage circuit.

Photo Credit: Mike Lavoie on Flickr

deadbeat dolls

Usually I’m hired to find a missing toy or locate deadbeat dolls who haven’t made payments on their cars. –Connie Cobbler: Toy Detective by James DeSalvo

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story from the POV of a deadbeat doll.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your favorite doll or toy from childhood.

Art Prompt: Deadbeat doll

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous or touching story about a favorite childhood toy.

Photo Credit: Leah Jones on Flickr

bookburning

A Bonfire of the Vanities (Italian: Falò delle vanità) is a burning of objects condemned by authorities as occasions of sin. The phrase usually refers to the bonfire of 7 February 1497, when supporters of the Dominican priest Girolamo Savonarola collected and publicly burned thousands of objects such as cosmetics, art, and books in Florence, Italy, on the Mardi Gras festival.[1] Such bonfires were not invented by Savonarola, but had been a common accompaniment to the outdoor sermons of San Bernardino di Siena in the first half of the century.

The focus of this destruction was nominally on objects that might tempt one to sin, including vanity items such as mirrors, cosmetics, fine dresses, playing cards, and even musical instruments. Other targets included books that were deemed to be immoral, such as works by Boccaccio, and manuscripts of secular songs, as well as artworks, including paintings and sculpture. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a bonfire of the vanities.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your feelings about books that you feel are abhorrent. Is it right to burn them or not?

Art Prompt: Bonfire of the Vanities

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the various methods of suppressing dangerous ideas.

Photo Credit: Dan Thompson on Flickr

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for February 21, 2016. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

The Creative Mindset

Carrie presents Do You Feel Guilty Making Time for Your Art? posted at Artist Think.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

SR Carson presents My Late Friend: Did You Hear my Prayer That Day? in response to Prompt #257 Childhood Friendships.

Linda Ann Nickerson presents To marry Annette and win it yet posted at Prompt #1564 Word of the Week – Winsome.

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Sharing Our Work

Jena Henry presents Who doesn’t love to travel? posted at Jena Books.

Liz presents This is Real Life #37 posted at Liz Andra Shaw.

Creativity Quote of the Week

The sensation of #writing a book is the sensation of spinning, blinded by love and daring. -Annie Dillard

Writing Tips

Amanda Patterson presents The 5 Essential Elements Of A Perfect Ending posted at Writers Write.

Mary Carroll Moore presents Where Do You Get Your Ideas? A Basic Primer of a Novelist’s Writing Process posted at How to Plan, Write and Develop a Book.

Sophia Warren presents Are hangovers good for writing? posted at Hopes&Fears.

KM Weiland presents The Lazy Author’s Way to Identify and Overcome Writing Weaknesses posted at Helping Writers Become Authors.

Janice Hardy presents At-Home Workshop: Revise Your Novel in 31 Days posted at Fiction University.

Kat Cantrell presents Demystifying the Outline posted at Romance University.

Mark Nichol presents 35 Troublesome Irregular Verbs posted at Daily Writing Tips.

Sophie Masson presents articletitle posted at Writer Unboxed.

Vonda Skelton presents 7 Punctuation Pitfalls for Writers to Avoid posted at The Write Conversation.

James Scott Bell presents The One Thing Every Protagonist Must Have posted at The Kill Zone.

Sue Colletta presents Tips To Tighten Our Writing posted at Crime Writer.

Jen Matera presents What Your Editor Expects From You posted at Write Divas.

Blogging

David Santistevan presents 10 Steps To Writing Irresistible Content That Everyone Wants To Share posted at Daily Blog Tips.

Chad presents Forgive My Typos posted at Darwinisms.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about How To Get The Most Out Of A Conference, with Kathy Chung.

Visual Arts

Christopher Jobson presents Explosive Mixed Media Paintings by Danny O’Conner posted at This is Colossal.

Journaling

Debra presents What makes you happy? A journal writing exercise posted at The Warm Milk Journal.

Jen presents 7 Things you can do right now to create a daily journaling habit posted at Journal Wild.

The Business of Creativity

Michael J. Sullivan presents Myths of Publishing: Anyone Can Self-publish, Part 4 posted at Amazing Stories.

Diana Urban presents How to Get Blurbs for Your Book & Use Them In Your Marketing posted at BookBub.

Bryan Hutchinson presents The Secret to Getting Celebrities to Endorse YOUR Writing posted at Positive Writer.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!