From the monthly archives: October 2016

fragileheart

…destiny permits no one to continue in blissful happiness. Fate could not tolerate it. Something trivial, a glance, a word, a touch, could shatter a friendship. A love deemed deep and lasting was so fragile it could disappear like straw in the wind. –The Contessa’s Vendetta: A Novel of Betrayal and Revenge by Mirella Sichirollo Patzer

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or poem inspired by a twist of fate.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when your happiness was shattered suddenly.

Art Prompt: Fragile fate

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story about a twist of fate.

Photo Credit: masaru minoya on Flickr

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for October 30, 2016. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

NaNoWriMo

Editors presents 38 Tips for Kicking NaNoWriMo in the Butt This Year posted at Reedsy.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

Mark Gardner presents Moonrise CH24 – New Friends in response to Prompt #1887 Life Line.

Chuck Downing presents A Science Guy’s Almanac – In Memory of My Dad in response to Prompt #1881 Dying at Home.

Frank presents The Exercise of Power in response to Prompt #1888 The Perils of Being Royalty.

Keira-Anne Hadley presents Island Honey Dance-Bar in response to Prompt #565 Call Girls.

impossiblesugar

libbydoyle

Creativity Quote of the Week

susancain

Creativity Prompt

Nada Adel presents Takhayyal #WritingPrompt no. 47: Darkness Cometh! posted at Nadaness In Motion.

Writing Tips

Mark Nichol presents 7 Tips for Editing to Improve Usage posted at Daily Writing Tips.

Janice Hardy presents Writing Basics: The Act Two Choice posted at Fiction University.

KM Weiland presents 6 Steps to Create a Fantastic Narrative Voice (What I Learned Writing Storming) posted at Word Play.

Jody presents How To Get Readers To Read Your Entire Series posted at Jody Hedlun.

Mary Carroll Moore presents Planting Twists in Your Story to Keep Readers on Their Toes posted at How to Plan, Write and Develop a Book.

Blogging

Slavko Desik presents Having a Vision is the First Step to Success posted at Daily Blog Tips.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Elemental Humor Q&A with Victoria Schwab.

This week’s podcast at The Self-Publishing Broadcast is all about Optimizing Your Amazon Sales Page for Conversion with Bryan Cohen.

This week’s podcast at The Sell More Books Show is all about Indies, Pricing and Premium Facebook.

Visual Arts

Christopher Jobson presents New Maddeningly Complex Doodle Drawings from Sagaki Keita posted at This is Colossal.

Journaling

Debra presents What Do I Believe? Tonight’s Journal Writing Prompt posted at The Warm Milk Journal.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

shipwreck

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Orin Zebest on Flickr

ugly-girl

Once upon a time, there was an ugly girl. –The Wicker Husband by Ursula Wills-Jones

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: When do you judge people by appearances? 

Art Prompt: Ugly girl

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about judging someone by appearances.

Photo Credit: Lana on Flickr

adhocracy

adhocracy n
(business) An organizational system designed to be flexible and responsive to the needs of the moment rather than excessively bureaucratic.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: How do you get involved in grassroots organizations? If you’re not involved, what kind of organization would you be interested in?

Art Prompt: Adhocracy

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: The People Speak! on Flickr

slays_hector

Shay, author of “Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma and the Undoing of Character” (Simon & Schuster, 1995), sees moral injury in combat as an issue dating back at least to Homer’s Iliad, the epic poem about the siege of Troy that’s dated to around the eighth century B.C. The poem opens with the commander of the Greek army, Agamemnon, taking a captive woman, Briseis, from the warrior Achilles. Achilles, offended by this betrayal of “what’s right” in Greek military culture, refuses to fight. He withdraws from all but his close companion, Patroclus — until Patroclus is killed and Achilles goes mad with grief, killing Patroclus’ killer Hector and desecrating the corpse.

Achilles’ berserker rage echoes the experiences of the Vietnam War veterans. Shay worked with for 20 years at a Boston VA outpatient clinic. Many saw their ideals crumble in combat. One soldier whose story is retold in “Achilles in Vietnam” describes watching for hours as suspected Vietcong unloaded boats in the South China Sea. Finally, he and his comrades got the order to shoot. They unloaded their weapons into the boats. When daylight came, they learned they’d killed a group of fishermen and children.

To add to the horror, the military leadership assured the soldiers that everything was fine — and then gave them awards for their valor. Shay’s patient got a Combat Infantryman Badge for his participation, an award that is supposed to mark a soldier’s experience of ground combat. The betrayal of getting kudos for killing civilians shook the soldier to his core. –How Old Is PTSD? by Stephanie Pappas

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where the protagonist suffers a moral injury.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react when you learn that you’ve been tricked into doing something you abhor?

Art Prompt: Moral injury

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of PTSD through the ages.

Photo Credit: Achilles Slays Hector by Peter Paul Rubens on Wikimedia

storyteller

I’ll make my report as if I told a story, for I was taught as a child on my homeworld that Truth is a matter of the imagination. The soundest fact may fail or prevail in the style of its telling: like that singular organic jewel of our seas, which grows brighter as one woman wears it and, worn by another, dulls and goes to dust. Facts are no more solid, coherent, round, and real than pearls are. But both are sensitive. –The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula LeGuin

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or poem about a truth that is as much imagination as fact.

Journaling Prompt: What can you imagine to be true that doesn’t exist yet?

Art Prompt: Truth and imagination

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience how they create truth through exercise of their imagination and give them tools to be a more effective creator.

Photo Credit: foam on Flickr

512px-winterhalter_-_queen_victoria_1843

On 29 May 1842, Victoria was riding in a carriage along The Mall, London, when John Francis aimed a pistol at her but the gun did not fire; he escaped. The following day, Victoria drove the same route, though faster and with a greater escort, in a deliberate attempt to provoke Francis to take a second aim and catch him in the act. As expected, Francis shot at her, but he was seized by plain-clothes policemen, and convicted of high treason. On 3 July, two days after Francis’s death sentence was commuted to transportation for life, John William Bean also tried to fire a pistol at the Queen, but it was loaded only with paper and tobacco and had too little charge… In 1850, the Queen did sustain injury when she was assaulted by a possibly insane ex-army officer, Robert Pate. As Victoria was riding in a carriage, Pate struck her with his cane, crushing her bonnet and bruising her forehead. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a royal in peril.

Journaling Prompt: Would you enjoy being royalty? Why or why not?

Art Prompt: Queen Victoria

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about Queen Victoria’s reign.

Photo Credit: Queen Victoria 1843 on Wikimedia

palm

It was as though the lifeline on her palm had fallen between the cracks of the impossible and the arbitrary. –“In Search of a Metaphysical Rock Star” by Sheri-D Wilson

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story with a protagonist with an unstable life line.

Journaling Prompt: Without knowing anything about palmistry, how would you describe your life line?

Art Prompt: Life line

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about being stuck in a place between impossible and arbitrary.

Photo Credit: Mary Watkin on Flickr

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for October 23, 2016. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

The Creative Mindset

Jena presents Writing about Writer’s Block posted at The Artful Linguist.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

Mark Gardner presents Moonrise CH23 – Reunion in response to Prompt #1880 Thirty Dollars a Day.

arika2

leisa-adamantine

Sharing Our Work

Miriam McGuirk presents As an Author, Blogger and Storyteller posted at Shattered Dreams & Scorpions at Midnight.

Eula McLeod presents Safe! posted at View from the Winepress.

Creativity Quote of the Week

karenblixen

Writing Tips

Janice Hardy presents Form Fitting: Using Story Structure to Your Advantage posted at Fiction University.

KM Weiland presents 2 Ways to Tell You’re Beginning Your Story Too Soon posted at Word Play.

Mary Carroll Moore presents How Do You End Your Story? Where to End, How to Decide, What to Make Sure You Include posted at How to Plan, Write and Develop a Book.

Mark Nichol presents 5 Examples of Misplaced Modifiers posted at Daily Writing Tips.

Nicki Porter presents 13 rules to maximize writing productivity posted at The Writer.

Stephanie Morrill presents Mail Bag: Titles, Killing Characters, Story Beginnings, and Fan Fiction posted at Go Teen Writers.

Katie Rose Guest Pryal presents Why “Write Every Day” Isn’t Always the Best Advice posted at Writers in the Storm.

Kristen Lamb presents Are Flashbacks Fizzling Your Fiction? Time as a Literary Device posted at Warrior Writers.

Robin Gianna presents Create Characters Your Reader Will Care About posted at Romance University.

Blogging

Chris Nosal presents How To Emotionally Connect With Your Readers posted at Daily Blog Tips.

Zac Johnson presents 5 Examples of How Bloggers are Using Video to Increase Engagement posted at Blogging Tips.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Humor as a Sub-Genre.

This week’s podcast at Goins Writer is all about How to Overcome the Fear of Rejection with Jia Jiang.

This week’s podcast at Rocking Self-Publishing is all about Adam Croft on Developing a Hook for Your Book.

This week’s podcast at The Self-Publishing Broadcast is all about Nailing Your Story with Monica Leonelle.

This week’s podcast at The Sell More Books Show is all about Middlemen, BookBub Analysis, and Real Authors.

Visual Arts

Christopher Jobson presents The Deep End: A Jaw-Dropping Animation Drawn by Hand with Ink, White-out, and Coffee by Jake Fried posted at This is Colossal.

Journaling

Debra presents Imagining This Today…. Today’s Journal Writing Prompt posted at The Warm Milk Journal.

The Business of Creativity

Jody presents 5 Traits That Foster Publishing Success posted at Jody Hedlund.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!