From the monthly archives: April 2017

Wishing to create an alien creature that did not look like a “man in a suit”, Terry Nation stated in his script for the first Dalek serial that they should have no legs. He was also inspired by a performance by the Georgian National Ballet, in which dancers in long skirts appeared to glide across the stage. For many of the shows, the Daleks were operated by retired ballet dancers wearing black socks while sitting inside the Dalek. Raymond Cusick (who died on 21 February 2013) was given the task of designing the Daleks when Ridley Scott, then a designer for the BBC, proved unavailable after having been initially assigned to their debut serial. An account in Jeremy Bentham’s Doctor Who—The Early Years (1986) says that after Nation wrote the script, Cusick was given only an hour to come up with the design for the Daleks, and was inspired in his initial sketches by a pepper shaker on a table. Cusick himself, however, states that he based it on a man seated in a chair, and only used the pepper shaker to demonstrate how it might move –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Create an alien creature for your screenplay. Don’t have a screenplay? Pretend you do! This is a creative kickstart.

Journaling Prompt: What do you believe that aliens look like?

Art Prompt: Daleks

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about your favorite fictional alien.

Photo Credit: pshab on Flickr

The woman was seated in a lofty chair of bright blue silk embroidered with dragons in a darker blue thread; these intense colors set off her gold headdress and the gown with its draperies that flowed around her. –Kate Elliott, Traitors’ Gate

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of someone who comes before this woman for judgement.

Journaling Prompt: Who was the most fearsome person who ever judged you?

Art Prompt: She who must be obeyed

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the challenge of judgement. 

Photo Credit: Tom Simpson on Flickr

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for April 23, 2017. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

The Creative Mindset

Elizabeth presents Creative Challenges for Better Productivity posted at Elizabeth Spann Craig.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

Stephanie Harvie presents Guardian Angels in response to Prompt #149 Guardian Angels.

Sharing Our Work

Patricia Beal presents My Trip to the Moon and Other Forgotten Miracles posted at ACFW.

Creativity Quote of the Week

Writing Tips

Janice Hardy presents The Single Biggest Mistake Self-Published Authors Make posted at Fiction University.

Oren Ashkenazi presents How to Craft a Character-Driven Story posted at Mythcreants.

Jo Robertson presents Revision with Diction and Syntax posted at Romance University.

KM Weiland presents Top 10 Ways to Rivet Readers with Plot Reveals posted at Word Play.

Shawn Coyne presents Love Story Cheat Sheet /Controlling Idea (Theme) posted at Steven Pressfield Online.

CS Lakin presents 3 Steps to Successfully Outlining Your Novel posted at Live, Write, Thrive.

The Magic Violinist presents 4 Strategies to Make it Through the Dreaded Middle of Your Story posted at The Write Practice.

Blogging

Elvis Michael presents How to Get Over Your Guest Blogging Fears posted at Blogging Pro.

Ryan Biddulph presents 1 Fundamental of Successful Blogging: Know Why and Make it Freeing posted at Blogging Tips.

Glenn Leibowitz presents This is What LinkedIn’s Editors Really Want posted at Write with Impact.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Goins Writer is all about How to Navigate the Intersection of Art and Entrepreneurship: Interview with Steph Halligan.

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Project in Depth, “Risk Assessment,” by Sandra Tayler.

This week’s podcast at The Self-Publishing Broadcast is all about Working With Editors with Jason Whited.

This week’s podcast at The Sell More Books Show is all about KU Numbers, Stigmas, and Contract Cop-outs.

This week’s podcast at PubCrawl is all about PUBLISHING 101 REDUX – QUERYING & REPRESENTATION.

The Business of Creativity

Page Barnes presents A Newbie’s Guide to Writing for the Huffington Post posted at Beyond Your Blog.

Eva Lesko Natiello presents The Pro Bono Marketing Staff Every Self-Published Author Has at Their Fingertips posted at The Book Designer.

Robert Kingett presents Use Magazine Vendor Websites to Find New Paying Markets posted at Funds for Writers.

Sophie Masson presents The Perfect Back Cover Blurb posted at Writer Unboxed.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Aloysius Hudon Beaulieu created marvelous blue ravens that stormy summer. –Blue Ravens by Gerald Vizenor

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: If you could create anything, what would you create?

Art Prompt: Ravens

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell  your audience about the most magical creation you’ve ever heard of.

Photo Credit: The Orion on Flickr

vitriolic adj
  • (chemistry) Of or pertaining to vitriol; derived from or resembling vitriol; vitriolous.
  • (figuratively) Bitterly scathing, caustic.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about someone who is vitriolic and how they make you feel

Art Prompt: Vitriolic

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Steve Rhodes on Flickr

A kibbutz (Hebrew: קִבּוּץ‎ / קיבוץ‎, lit. “gathering, clustering”; plural kibbutzim קִבּוּצִים‎ / קיבוצים‎) is a collective community in Israel that was traditionally based on agriculture. The first kibbutz, established in 1909, was Degania. Today, farming has been partly supplanted by other economic branches, including industrial plants and high-tech enterprises. Kibbutzim began as utopian communities, a combination of socialism and Zionism. In recent decades, some kibbutzim have been privatized and changes have been made in the communal lifestyle. A member of a kibbutz is called a kibbutznik (Hebrew: קִבּוּצְנִיק‎ / קיבוצניק‎).-Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set on a kibbutz or another type of collective community.

Journaling Prompt: How do you get along with the people you live with? What do you struggle with and wish could change? What is the best part about it?

Art Prompt: Kibbutz

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of collective living.

She went her unremembering way,
She went and left in me
The pang of all the partings gone,
And partings yet to be.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story, poem, or haiku about partings.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the loss of someone you loved.

Art Prompt: Partings

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story about a loss that changed your life.

Photo Credit: Thomas Hawk on Flickr

Samantha Reed Smith (June 29, 1972 – August 25, 1985) was an American schoolgirl, peace activist and child actress from Manchester, Maine, who became famous in the Cold War era United States and Soviet Union. In 1982, Smith wrote a letter to the newly appointed CPSU General Secretary Yuri Andropov and received a personal reply with a personal invitation to visit the Soviet Union, which she accepted.

Smith attracted extensive media attention in both countries as a “Goodwill Ambassador” and became known as “America’s Youngest Ambassador” participating in peacemaking activities in Japan.[1] She wrote a book about her visit to the Soviet Union and co-starred in the television series Lime Street, before her death at the age of 13 in the Bar Harbor Airlines Flight 1808 plane crash. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Tell the story of a remarkable child.

Journaling Prompt: What did you do as a kid that you are still proud of?

Art Prompt: Peace

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about Samantha Smith and draw some lessons that we can learn from her.

Photo Credit: U.S. girl Samantha Smith in Artek on Wikimedia

Having climbed the ranks in her finance company to CFO quickly and efficiently, Marin understands there were those who viewed her with contempt. Names whispered behind her back as she chaired meetings and led the company through mergers and acquisitions, one success following another. She worked hard for her place in the world. Others’ jealousies or opinions are not her problem, and she will not allow them to constrain her. She knows plenty of women whose self-esteem is based on the estimations of others. They choose the clothes that are in fashion, even if they don’t suit their taste. They let their colleagues define the boundaries of their careers. Live their lives according to strangers’ rules. Marin congratulates herself for being above the rest. For standing in a place of her own making, for earning her success and creating her perfect life. –Sejal Badani, Trail of Broken Wings

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a powerful, self-made woman.

Journaling Prompt: How do you measure success?

Art Prompt: Powerful woman

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about a powerful woman and how she gained her power.

Photo Credit: Sam Churchill on Flickr