From the monthly archives: December 2017

Backmasking is a recording technique in which a sound or message is recorded backward onto a track that is meant to be played forward. Backmasking is a deliberate process, whereas a message found through phonetic reversal may be unintentional.

Backmasking was popularised by The Beatles, who used backward instrumentation on their 1966 album Revolver. Artists have since used backmasking for artistic, comedic and satiric effect, on both analogue and digital recordings. The technique has also been used to censor words or phrases for “clean” releases of explicit songs.

Backmasking has been a controversial topic in the United States since the 1970s and popular during the 1980s and 1990s, when allegations from Christian groups of its use for Satanic purposes were made against prominent rock musicians, leading to record-burning protests and proposed anti-backmasking legislation by state and federal governments. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which an unorthodox form of communication is used to disguise the real message.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about hidden messages in music or film?

Art Prompt: Backmasking

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the Beatles scandal with backmasking.

Photo Credit: Scott Schiller on Flickr

He remembered a life that seemed simpler now because in those days he’d loved the answers more than the questions. –Lamentation (The Psalms of Isaak) by Ken Scholes

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about an old man whose way of thinking about life has taken a sudden flip.

Journaling Prompt: How have your opinions changed in the last year?

Art Prompt: Loving the questions

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how opinions and viewpoints change over time as people age.

Photo Credit: Xavi Talleda on Flickr

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for December 10, 2017. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

The Creative Mindset

Barry Davret presents How An “Experience” Journal Fuels My Daily Writing Habit posted at Medium.

Dan Lewis presents The Surprising Way to Get Rejected posted at Now I Know.

CS Lakin presents The Life of a Super-Productive Writer posted at Live Write Thrive.

Jules presents FIVE THINGS I’VE LEARNED ABOUT BEING A PRE-PUBLISHED DEBUT posted at PubCrawl.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

Writing Tips

Ashley Clark presents The Story Within Your Story posted at The Writer’s Alley.

Suzanne Brockmann presents Story Within the Story posted at Romance University.

KM Weiland presents Writing Voice: 6 Things You Need to Know to Improve It posted at Helping Writers Become Authors.

Ella Joy Olsen presents Your Dead Ancestors Can Help You Write That book posted at Writers in the Storm.

Jeff Elkins presents 3 Clever Ways to Write What You Know posted at The Write Practice.

Kristen presents Deep POV: Using Personal Vows To Increase Story Tension posted at Kristen Lamb.

Blogging

Ryan Biddulph presents 1 Surefire Way To Leave Blogging Trolls In The Dust posted at Blogging Tips.

Creativity Quote of the Week

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at The Self-Publishing Broadcast is all about Buying Ads and Building Mailing Lists with Jonny Andrews.

This week’s podcast at The Sell More Books Show is all about Long Days, High Prices, and Doing It All.

This week’s podcast at The Joined Up Podcast is all about Sarah Hilary – BritCrime Special.

This week’s podcast at Kunz On Publishing is all about 3 Steps To Creating A Winning Sell Sheet For Your Book.

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Short Fiction Markets, with Spencer Ellsworth and guest host Beth Meacham.

This week’s podcast at The Creative Penn is all about Real Artists Don’t Starve. Creativity And Money With Jeff Goins.

This week’s podcast at The Author Biz is all about Juggling Life, Family and Your Author Business, with Jim Heskett.

The Business of Creativity

Rachelle presents LESSONS FROM THE GYM posted at Rachelle Gardner.

John Soares presents LinkedIn Profinder for Freelance Writers: Pros and Cons posted at Productive Writers.

Clare Whitmell presents 7 Ways You Can Use Your Mailing List to Drive Sales posted at Publishing Spark.

Karen McCoy presents Why Getting to Know Your Library is Crucial for Book Promotion posted at The Write Life.

Molly Jo Realy presents PROOFREAD YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS posted at The Write Conversation.

Jo Linsdell presents Author School Visits posted at Writers and Authors.

Jane presents So You’re an Author Without a Social Media Presence: Now What? posted at Jane Friedman.

Ryan Holiday presents Note to All Creatives: Marketing is Your Job posted at Goins Writer.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Paul K on Flickr

“It’s safe to say you killed them . . . isn’t that right?” –Last Winter, We Parted by Fuminori Nakamura, translated from the Japanese by Allison Markin Powell

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about something you feel guilty about.

Art Prompt: Guilty conscience

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about your guilty conscience.

Photo Credit: Craig Sunter on Flickr

miscreant
  • Disbelieving; heretical.
  • Depraved; behaving badly.
  • A disbeliever; a heretic.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your favorite miscreant

Art Prompt: Miscreant

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Use the word of the week in your speech or article.

Photo Credit: Paul Townsend on Flickr

Fighting in ice hockey is an established tradition of the sport in North America, with a long history that involves many levels of amateur and professional play and includes some notable individual fights. Fighting is usually performed by enforcers, or “goons”—players whose role is to fight and intimidate—on a given team, and is governed by a complex system of unwritten rules that players, coaches, officials, and the media refer to as “the code”. Some fights are spontaneous, while others are premeditated by the participants. While officials tolerate fighting during hockey games, they impose a variety of penalties on players who engage in fights.

Unique among North American professional team sports, the National Hockey League (NHL) and most minor professional leagues in North America do not eject players outright for fighting (although they may do so for more flagrant violations as part of a fight) but major European and collegiate hockey leagues do, and multi-game suspensions may be added on top of the ejection. Therefore, the vast majority of fights occur in the NHL and other North American professional leagues. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about fights in professional sports?

Art Prompt: Hockey

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of fighting in hockey.

Photo Credit: slgckgc on Flickr

Zombies had a bad reputation before they even existed, and it took a while for people to come to grips with the difference between the myth and the reality. –Sweet Kiss Apocalypse by Jen Rewell

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Are you ready for the zombie apocalypse?

Art Prompt: Zombies

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about how you believe the zombie apocalypse will come about.

Photo Credit: David Simmonds on Flickr

Although they did not fix their schedules to the clock in the modern sense, ancient civilizations adjusted daily schedules to the sun more flexibly than DST does, often dividing daylight into twelve hours regardless of daytime, so that each daylight hour was longer during summer. For example, the Romans kept time with water clocks that had different scales for different months of the year: at Rome’s latitude the third hour from sunrise, hora tertia, started by modern standards at 09:02 solar time and lasted 44 minutes at the winter solstice, but at the summer solstice it started at 06:58 and lasted 75 minutes. After ancient times, equal-length civil hours eventually supplanted unequal, so civil time no longer varies by season. Unequal hours are still used in a few traditional settings, such as some monasteries of Mount Athos and all Jewish ceremonies. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set in a location where the time changes all the time and from one city to another.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about daylight savings time?

Art Prompt: Time

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of daylight savings time.

Photo Credit: Juan Llanos on Flickr

The mist had melted, revealing babies on graves. Old graves, fresh graves, graves of people he had known and people who had died before he came to this church. Graves people cared for, and graves of people no one remembered. Every grave in this small cemetery had a baby on it. -A Hundred Babies by Nina Kiriki Hoffman

Fiction Writing Prompt: Where did the babies comes from? Write the story that leads up to this scene.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your last visit to a cemetary.

Art Prompt: Cemetary

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story that happens in a cemetary.

Photo Credit: Denise O’Brien on Flickr