Although they did not fix their schedules to the clock in the modern sense, ancient civilizations adjusted daily schedules to the sun more flexibly than DST does, often dividing daylight into twelve hours regardless of daytime, so that each daylight hour was longer during summer. For example, the Romans kept time with water clocks that had different scales for different months of the year: at Rome’s latitude the third hour from sunrise, hora tertia, started by modern standards at 09:02 solar time and lasted 44 minutes at the winter solstice, but at the summer solstice it started at 06:58 and lasted 75 minutes. After ancient times, equal-length civil hours eventually supplanted unequal, so civil time no longer varies by season. Unequal hours are still used in a few traditional settings, such as some monasteries of Mount Athos and all Jewish ceremonies. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set in a location where the time changes all the time and from one city to another.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about daylight savings time?

Art Prompt: Time

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of daylight savings time.

Photo Credit: Juan Llanos on Flickr

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