Posts by: Liz

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for February 4, 2018. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

This Week on The Writing Reader

The Creative Mindset

Colleen M. Story presents How to Slow Time for More Relaxed, Creative Writing Sessions posted at Elizabeth Spann Craig.

Jody presents Should You Become a Writer? posted at Jody Hedlund.

Nicole Dieker presents #SquadGoals: Why Every Freelancer Needs a Writing Community posted at The Write Life.

Jeff Elkins presents 3 Essential Comments Every Writer Needs to Hear posted at The Write Practice.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

Mark Gardner presents Space Combat in response to Prompt #4059 Interstellar Embargo.

Creativity Quote of the Week

Writing Tips

Janice Hardy presents Why Characters Need Choices in Fiction posted at Writers Helping Writers.

KM Weiland presents 16 Ways to Make Your Setting a Character in Its Own Right posted at Helping Writers Become Authors.

Robert Wood presents How To Avoid Writing A Mary Sue Protagonist posted at Standout Books.

Jami presents Story Tropes: Lazy or Helpful? posted at Jami Gold.

Anne presents 10 Reasons to Start an Author Blog: And Why It’s Easier than You Think posted at Anne R. Allen’s Blog.

Blogging

Nina Amir presents Time Management Tips for Blogging Success posted at How to Blog a Book.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Raising the Stakes.

This week’s podcast at Mythcreants is all about Werewolves.

This week’s podcast at The Author Biz is all about Creating a Multi-Author Universe from Scratch with guest Martha Carr.

This week’s podcast at The Self-Publishing Broadcast is all about Using Cultural Shorthand and Established Patterns to Tell Better Stories.

This week’s podcast at The Sell More Books Show is all about More Scams, Book Titles, and the Kindle Oasis.

This week’s podcast at The Joined Up Podcast is all about Novelist Rob Palk – Getting an Agent.

Videos

Journaling

Andy Mort presents HOW TO ADOPT THE POSITIVE HABIT OF JOURNALING posted at Positive Writer.

The Business of Creativity

Ali Luke presents Why Novel Series Are So Popular With Indie Authors … and Readers posted at AliVentures.

Joel Friedlander presents Optimum Book Length: the Long and Short of Page Count posted at BookWorks.

Frances Caballo presents Hashtags Just for Writers posted at Social Media Just for Authors.

Rachelle presents SO MANY IDEAS, SO LITTLE TIME posted at Rachelle Gardner.

Erika Liodice presents Why Do Some Writers Choose to Go ‘Indie’? posted at Writer Unboxed.

Kevin McNamara presents How Book Reviews Influence Book Sales posted at Writers and Authors.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

Kathryn Merlangton stared at the vase cradling the dying roses. Two red blooms bowed over the white sympathy card like mourners looking down upon a casket. –Hope by Sam Rook

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about what dead roses make you think about.

Art Prompt: Dead roses

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story that contains dead roses.

Photo Credit: David Hepworth on Flickr

choler
  1. Irritation of the passions; anger; wrath.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: What irritates you and makes you angry?

Art Prompt: Choler

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Craig Sunter on Flickr

Real-life encounters and face-to-face contact with other people are on the decline in a world that is becoming increasingly computerized. Many routine tasks are delegated to virtual characters. People spend hours role-playing through virtual-reality video games by taking on the persona of a virtual character or avatar.

Such video games can even lead people to acquire and practice real-life skills and new viewpoints. Weger and his fellow researchers therefore explored how role-playing video gaming influences social behavior and decision-making. Participants in their study first played an immersive game for seven minutes as an avatar. Afterwards, they completed a job selection task in which they had the option of overriding incorrect choices made by a computer.

It was found that role-playing as the avatar in an immersive video game, compared to merely watching others play, makes people identify with a computer. They do so to such an extent that they actually start to conform to its decisions and follow its judgment — sometimes even if it is downright wrong. This shows that people conform, even when opinions are voiced by nonhuman agents. This is especially prevalent in ambiguous cases. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of someone who becomes his/her avatar.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about online gaming and interacting with people you only know through their avatars?

Art Prompt: Avatar

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about this study and what it means for them if they are gaming online.

Photo Credit: Ben Jeffreys on Flickr

Since the Invasion six ruinous embargoes for months apiece had strangled this city whose lifeline must pulse with interstellar commerce to survive. Sequestered, how could this city exist? Six times in twenty years he’d asked himself that. Answer? It couldn’t. –Babel-17 / Empire Star by Samuel R. Delany

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of an isolated city that is cut off from all trade and how it survives.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel when someone withdraws attention from you?

Art Prompt: Embargo

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how embargoes are used for political purposes.

Photo Credit: GôDiNô on Flickr

Evidence from some wrongful-conviction cases suggests that suspects can be questioned in ways that lead them to falsely believe in and confess to committing crimes they didn’t actually commit. New research provides lab-based evidence for this phenomenon, showing that innocent adult participants can be convinced, over the course of a few hours, that they had perpetrated crimes as serious as assault with a weapon in their teenage years…

“All participants need to generate a richly detailed false memory is 3 hours in a friendly interview environment, where the interviewer introduces a few wrong details and uses poor memory-retrieval techniques.”

Importantly, the false event stories included some true details about that time in the student’s life, taken from the caregiver questionnaire.
Participants were asked to explain what happened in each of the two events. When they had difficulty explaining the false event, the interviewer encouraged them to try anyway, explaining that if they used specific memory strategies they might be able to recall more details.

In the second and third interviews, the researchers again asked the students to recall as much as they could about both the true and false event. The students also described certain features of each memory, such as how vivid it was and how confident they were about it.
Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story about someone who is led to believe that he/she did something terrible.

Journaling Prompt: What is the worst thing you remember ever doing?

Art Prompt: Coersion

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience how easily people can be convinced that they committed a crime.

Photo Credit: Chris Tse on Flickr

The lesser gods, the Titans and their Olympian children, had turned their full thought on the destruction of God and his heavenly home. I was among them, a foolish child hoping to please her parents, not realizing the weight her actions carried. –Pilgrimage of Angels by Raymond Sardella and J. D. Rice

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story from the point of view of a lesser God caught up in a rebellion.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about the old gods of myth? What have you learned from those stories?

Art Prompt: Rebellion in the heavens

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the role of mythology in the development of civilzation.

Photo Credit: Gigants on Wikimedia

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for January 28, 2018. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

Coming Up This Week on The Writing Reading

The Creative Mindset

Jennifer Louden presents 6 Ways to Increase Productivity as a Writer Without Burning Out posted at Writers in the Storm.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

Diane Howard responded in the comments to Prompt #4091 A Hundred Dead Babies.

Mark Gardner presents Goodbye Razor’s Reef in response to Prompt #4054 Word of the Week – Detritus.

Creativity Quote of the Week

Writing Tips

KM Weiland presents A New Way to Think About Scene Structure posted at Helping Writers Become Authors.

Jennifer Slattery presents Strong Openings to Overcome Reader Impatience posted at Novel Rocket.

Jennifer Brown Banks presents Friction With Your Fiction? 5 Ways to Fix it! posted at Pen & Prosper.

Pepper Basham presents Character Arc – Part 1 – The Basics posted at The Writers Alley.

EM Thomas presents Advice for New and Aspiring Writers posted at Writers and Authors.

Blogging

Ali Luke presents How to Create a Free Blog or Website: A Step-by-Step Guide for Writers posted at AliVentures.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at The Joined Up Podcast is all about Thriller Writer MW Leeming Interview.

This week’s podcast at The Creative Penn is all about Stop Worrying, Start Writing. How to Overcome Fear and Self-Doubt with Sarah Painter.

This week’s podcast at Rocking Self-Publishing is all about The Power of Persistence with Gary Jonas.

This week’s podcast at The Self-Publishing Broadcast is all about Algorithms, Gamification, and Facebook Live.

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Structuring a Novel.

The Business of Creativity

Penny Sansevieri presents Amazon Keywords Can Make or Break Your Book Sales posted at Book Works.

Sukhi Jutla presents How to Write a Book Description that Sells Books posted at Author Entrepreneurs.

Rachelle presents HOW TO GET PUBLISHED posted at Rachelle Gardner.

Linda Broday presents How I Became a Published Author posted at Romance University.

Frances Caballo presents Have You Seen These Social Media Changes? Part II posted at Social Media Just for Writers.

Edie Melson presents WHAT IS AMAZON MARKETING SERVICES, AND SHOULD I BE USING IT? (PART 1) posted at The Write Life.

Editor presents How To Submit To Independent And University Publishers posted at Writer’s Relief.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: hoher on Flickr

At the beginning of my vacation I woke up and realized I’d be spending it alone. –Ben Barka Lane by Mahmoud Saeed

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about something you had to do alone that you had wanted to share with someone.

Art Prompt: All alone

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about solo vacationing.

Photo Credit: Ronald van Holst on Flickr