Currently viewing the category: "Writing Prompt"

The Sunday Times Golden Globe Race was a non-stop, single-handed, round-the-world yacht race, held in 1968–1969, and was the first round-the-world yacht race. The race was controversial due to the failure of most competitors to finish the race and because of the suicide of one entrant; however, it ultimately led to the founding of the BOC Challenge and Vendée Globe round-the-world races, both of which continue to be successful and popular.

The race was sponsored by the British Sunday Times newspaper and was designed to capitalise on a number of individual round-the-world voyages which were already being planned by various sailors; for this reason, there were no qualification requirements, and competitors were offered the opportunity to join and permitted to start at any time between 1 June and 31 October 1968. The Golden Globe trophy was offered to the first person to complete an unassisted, non-stop single-handed circumnavigation of the world via the great capes, and a separate £5,000 prize was offered for the fastest single-handed circumnavigation.

Nine sailors started the race; four retired before leaving the Atlantic Ocean. Of the five remaining, Chay Blyth, who had set off with absolutely no sailing experience, sailed past the Cape of Good Hope before retiring; Nigel Tetley sank with 1,100 nautical miles (2,000 km) to go while leading; Donald Crowhurst, who, in desperation, attempted to fake a round-the-world voyage to avoid financial ruin, began to show signs of mental illness, and then committed suicide; and Bernard Moitessier, who rejected the philosophy behind a commercialised competition, abandoned the race while in a strong position to win and kept sailing non-stop until he reached Tahiti after circling the globe one and a half times. Robin Knox-Johnston was the only entrant to complete the race, becoming the first person to sail single-handed and non-stop around the world. He was awarded both prizes, and later donated the £5,000 to a fund supporting Crowhurst’s family. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a competition that must be completed singlehandedly and alone against great odds.

Journaling Prompt: What is the most challenging thing you’ve ever attempted alone? Write about the challenges you overcame.

Art Prompt: Yacht race

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about a person who overcame isolation and the elements and emerged triumphant.

Photo Credit: GoldenGlobeRaceRoute on Wikimedia

Some people forget, he thought. A bad thing happens to them and their mind sweeps in and buries the bad thing deep, and all that’s left is a stretch of white in their heads, like fresh snow. Looking at it—at them—you wouldn’t even know anything was trapped beneath.
Some people forget, but David remembered everything. –Warm Up by V.E. Schwab

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about someone who can’t forget anything.

Journaling Prompt: Write about something you wish you could forget.

Art Prompt: Try to Forget

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how they can cope with painful memories.

Photo Credit: Bart on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Reading Wendy on Big Happy Fun House

Welcome to the Carnival of Creativity for September 17, 2017. All links will open in a new tab or window, so feel free to click through and leave some love in the comments. Once you close that window, you’ll be right back here for more linky goodness.

The Creative Mindset

Paivi presents 4 Social Tips for Improving Your Art posted at Peony and Parakeet.

Response to Writing Reader Prompt

Kez Shepherd presents Flakes in response to Prompt #4009 Medical Explanations for Mythic Creatures.

 

 

Creativity Quote of the Week

Creativity Prompt

Nada Adel presents Takhayyal writing prompt 70: Midnight Magic posted at Nadaness in Motion.

Writing Tips

Priyanka Misra presents 10 Common Grammatical Errors and How to Avoid Them! posted at Digital Pubbing.

Ali Luke presents Choosing Viewpoint Characters: What’s Right for Your Story? posted at AliVentures.

CS Lakin presents A Look at 8 Key Male Archetypes for Your Novel posted at Live Write Thrive.

Jennifer Brown Banks presents How to Use Minimal Words for Maximum Impact: When Writing Short Blog Posts posted at Women on Writing.

Oren Ashkenazi presents Six Ways Flight Changes a Fantasy Setting posted at Mythcreants.

Jennifer Baruta presents How to Hook Readers with Nuanced Emotion posted at Mythic Scribes.

Jonathan Vars presents Six Important Elements of Dystopian Fiction posted at Novel Publicity.

Brooke Faulkner presents How To Combat Abrupt Writer’s Apathy posted at Paving My Author’s Road.

Bryan Hutchinson presents 3 Ways To Get Your Writing Back to: Awesome posted at Positive Writer.

Jodi presents CHARACTERS – THEN AND NOW posted at Pub Crawl.

Blogging

Neal Samudre presents How to Write Your First Viral Article in 30 Minutes or Less posted at Goins Writer.

Podcasts

This week’s podcast at Writing Excuses is all about Creating Great Outlines.

This week’s podcast at The Sell More Books Show is all about BookBub vs. Facebook, Pottermore, and Author Solutions.

This week’s podcast at The Self-Publishing Broadcast is all about Experimental Way to Deliver Books on the Indie Fiction Podcast.

The Business of Creativity

Katrina Archer presents Formatting Your Book With Scrivener posted at Fiction University.

Carol Tice presents 4 Easy Freelance Marketing Ideas for the Holidays posted at Make a Living Writing.

John Soares presents Secrets of Successful Meetings with Freelance Writing Clients posted at Productive Writer.

That’s all for this week. Be sure to submit your article for next week’s Carnival of Creativity by Friday at midnight!

 

Most men in my family make widows of their wives and orphans of their children. –Enon by Paul Harding

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What is the riskiest behavior that your significant other has ever engaged in? How did it make you feel?

Art Prompt: Risky business

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story in which someone almost pays the ultimate price.

Photo Credit: Andreas Bjärlestam on Flickr

garrulous
  • Talking much, especially about commonplace or trivial things; talkative.
  • Wordy.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel when you are around a garrulous friend?

Art Prompt: Garrulous

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Béliza Mendes on Flickr

When the litters are overturned by the whirlwind
and faces are covered by cloaks,
the new republic will be troubled by its people.
At this time the reds and the whites will rule wrongly.
Nostradamus

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a revolution.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about protests?

Art Prompt: Protest

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of a protest that changed history.

Photo Credit: lio leiser on Flickr

Just before eight o’clock (then about sundown, in that latitude) the cry of “All hands ahoy!” was sounded down the fore scuttle and the after hatchway, and hurrying upon deck, we found a large black cloud rolling on toward us from the south-west, and blackening the whole heavens. “Here comes Cape Horn!” said the chief mate; and we had hardly time to haul down and clew up, before it was upon us. In a few moments, a heavier sea was raised than I had ever seen before, and as it was directly ahead, the little brig, which was no better than a bathing machine, plunged into it, and all the forward part of her was under water; the sea pouring in through the bow-ports and hawse-hole and over the knightheads, threatening to wash everything overboard. In the lee scuppers it was up to a man’s waist. We sprang aloft and double reefed the topsails, and furled all the other sails, and made all snug. But this would not do; the brig was laboring and straining against the head sea, and the gale was growing worse and worse. At the same time sleet and hail were driving with all fury against us. We clewed down, and hauled out the reef-tackles again, and close-reefed the fore-topsail, and furled the main, and hove her to on the starboard tack. Here was an end to our fine prospects. –Before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana Jr.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of involving a ship and a storm..

Journaling Prompt: What is the most frightening weather disaster you’ve lived through.

Art Prompt: Storm at sea

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the true story of a dramatic shipwreck.

Porphyria has been suggested as an explanation for the origin of vampire and werewolf legends, based upon certain perceived similarities between the condition and the folklore.

In January 1964, L. Illis’s 1963 paper, “On Porphyria and the Aetiology of Werwolves,” was published in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine. Later, Nancy Garden argued for a connection between porphyria and the vampire belief in her 1973 book, Vampires. In 1985, biochemist David Dolphin’s paper for the American Association for the Advancement of Science, “Porphyria, Vampires, and Werewolves: The Aetiology of European Metamorphosis Legends,” gained widespread media coverage, popularizing the idea.

The theory has been rejected by a few folklorists and researchers as not accurately describing the characteristics of the original werewolf and vampire legends or the disease, and as potentially stigmatizing sufferers of porphyria.

A 1995 article from the Postgraduate Medical Journal (via NIH) explains:
As it was believed that the folkloric vampire could move about freely in daylight hours, as opposed to the 20th century variant, congenital erythropoietic porphyria cannot readily explain the folkloric vampire but may be an explanation of the vampire as we know it in the 20th century. In addition, the folkloric vampire, when unearthed, was always described as looking quite healthy (“as they were in life”), while due to disfiguring aspects of the disease, sufferers would not have passed the exhumation test. Individuals with congenital erythropoietic porphyria do not crave blood. The enzyme (hematin) necessary to alleviate symptoms is not absorbed intact on oral ingestion, and drinking blood would have no beneficial effect on the sufferer. Finally, and most important, the fact that vampire reports were literally rampant in the 18th century, and that congenital erythropoietic porphyria is an extremely rare manifestation of a rare disease, makes it an unlikely explanation of the folkloric vampire. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about someone with a medical condition who is shunned because the condition is misunderstood.

Journaling Prompt: What medical condition are you afraid of? How does that cause you to act around people with the condition?

Art Prompt: Vampires

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of medical investigation.

Photo Credit: Edvard Munch – Vampire (1895) on Wikimedia

Now the chi-lin, the Chinese unicorn, is not only an altogether different species from the white European variety or the menacing Persian karkadann; it is also a different matter in its essence from either one. Apart from its singular physical appearance—indeed, there are scholars who claim that the chi-lin is no unicorn at all, but some sort of mystical dragon-horse, given its multicolored coat and the curious configuration of its head and body—this marvelous being is considered one of the Four Superior Animals of Good Omen, the others being the phoenix, the turtle, and the dragon itself. –The Story of Kao Yu by Peter S. Beagle

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a mythical creature, like the chi-lin, that wanders into modern society.

Journaling Prompt: Would you like to meet a chi-lin, which is a creature that punishes falsehood? Why or why not?

Art Prompt: Chi-lin

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about a mythical creature that they may not have heard from and what we learn from it about the society that imagined it.