Currently viewing the category: "Writing Prompt"

“Meet me tomorrow?” she said. –Under the Eaves by LAVIE TIDHAR

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a secret rendezvous you had as a young person.

Art Prompt: Rendezvous

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story of a young love.

Photo Credit: Suzette – www.suzette.nu on Flickr

pusillanimous

  • lacking courage or resolution; cowardly; faint-hearted; timid.
  • proceeding from or indicating a cowardly spirit.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: What do you wish you had the courage to do?

Art Prompt: Pusillanimous

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Insomnia Cured Here on Flickr

Fat shaming on social media has become prevalent and weight is the most common reason children are bullied in school with 85 percent of surveyed adolescents reportedly seeing overweight classmates teased in gym class, McHugh said.

Evidence confirms that fat shaming is not an effective approach to reducing obesity or improving health, McHugh said. “Rather, stigmatization of obese individuals poses serious risks to their psychological health,” she added. “Research demonstrates that weight stigma leads to psychological stress, which can lead to poor physical and psychological health outcomes for obese people.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which conflict is driven by shaming based on a physical characterist.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about fat people? What thoughts pop into your mind when you see someone who is fat?

Art Prompt: Fat Shamin

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about fat shaming on social media in today’s culture.

Photo Credit: Facebook Screen Capture

It’s impossible to give someone the world. You can show them glimpses of yours, hope they join you in it, but to give them the world means you have to be willing to give up your own. –Sejal Badani, Trail of Broken Wings

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about someone who wants the world, and isn’t worried about destroying the other person to get it.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the boundaries that you have that help you protect your world.

Art Prompt: If I gave you the world…

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how abusive spouses use power and control to demolish their victim’s world.

Photo Credit: Cindy Schultz on Flickr

The history of merit badges in the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) has been tracked by categorizing them into a series of merit badge types. In addition to the Boy Scouts of America, many other Scouting and Scouting-like organizations around the world, such as Pathfinders, Baden-Powell Scouts and Royal Rangers, issue merit badges or their equivalent; though they are sometimes called honors or proficiency badges. Other organizations, such as fire brigades, issue badges or awards that they refer to as merit badges, but that are in some respects different from the badges awarded by the BSA.

…In 1911, the BSA manufactured the first official 57 merit badges and began awarding them.The number of badges available has been as high as 127 in 1975 and again in 1987. As of March 2014, the number of badges available is 134. Merit badge types are identifiable by the cloth and manufacturing process used to make them. The classification of badges into types came about as a way for collectors to categorize and classify their collections. Merit badge collectors often collect other Scouting memorabilia as well. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which the pursuit of a merit badge (or some equivalent) drives the plot.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a merit badge or some other award you earned that meant a great deal to you.

Art Prompt: Merit badge

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of merit badges.

Photo Credit: dennis crowley on Flickr

The Plastic People of the Universe (PPU), started with no political agenda but is widely regarded as having spurred a revolution in Czechoslovakia. The band started in 1968, the same year that Prague was invaded by Soviet tanks to shut down the liberalization known as the Prague spring. The new communist government suppressed free speech, imprisoning many musicians,. The PPU were forbidden by the government on several occasions to play, not because of any inflammatory lyric content, but because of their long hair and emulation of capitalist bands like the Velvet Underground and Frank Zappa. (The band took their name from a Zappa song.) In 1970, the government revoked PPU’s musician licenses, which made it impossible for them to get equipment or gigs; they had to play underground concerts to avoid government detection and arrest. –The World in Six Songs by Daniel J. Levitin

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which music creates change.

Journaling Prompt: What song made you think about the world in a different way? Write about what you learned from the song.

Art Prompt: Protest Music

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of protest music in your country.

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Silence, solitude, and breathable air, that’s all I wanted, not exactly a miracle, but I guess this nightmare of a job is what I deserve. –Monster’s Chef by Jervey Tervalon

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your basic needs for a happy life.

Art Prompt: What I need to be happy

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how they can decrease stress and increase happiness in their lives.

Photo Credit: daliscar1 on Flickr

gourmand
  • One who eats to excess.
  • A lover of good food.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your relationship with food.

Art Prompt: Gourmand

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Peter Forret on Flickr

The Sydney Riot of 1879 was a civil disorder that occurred at an early international cricket match. It took place in Sydney, Australia, at the Association Ground, Moore Park, now known as the Sydney Cricket Ground, during a match between a touring English team captained by Lord Harris and New South Wales, led by Dave Gregory, who was also the captain of Australia.

The riot was sparked by a controversial umpiring decision, when star Australian batsman Billy Murdoch was given out by George Coulthard, a Victorian employed by the Englishmen. The dismissal caused an uproar among the parochial spectators, many of whom surged onto the pitch and assaulted Coulthard and some English players. It was alleged that illegal gamblers in the New South Wales pavilion, who had bet heavily on the home side, encouraged the riot because the tourists were in a dominant position and looked set to win. Another theory given to explain the anger was that of intercolonial rivalry, that the New South Wales crowd objected to what they perceived to be a slight from a Victorian umpire. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a riot at a sporting event and the fallout from it.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react to bad calls in a close sports match?

Art Prompt: Cricket

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of riots at sporting events and talk about the psychology of this phenomenon.

Photo Credit: Association Ground Sydney on Wikimedia Commons