Currently viewing the tag: "behavior"

berate
  • To scold severely or angrily.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about how you felt when being berated. How do you cope with angry people?

Art Prompt: Berate

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Neal on Flickr

bombast
  • Pompous or pretentious speech or writing.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about someone you think is bombastic and how you feel about what they say.

Art Prompt: Bombast

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

My husband used to start my car for me on cold mornings, would turn the heater on full blast as he brushed off the snow and ice. I guess we’re even now. I used to make lunches for him to take to work, but no more. I’d hand him the bulky paper bag with a kiss and a whisper about last night or tonight after the girls are in bed. I packed him heart-healthy meals, since his cholesterol was up: turkey sandwiches on whole wheat, oat bran muffins, baggies of grapes or sliced carrots. I quit doing it when I found the cache of uneaten lunches stuffed behind the seat of his truck, along with the crumpled McDonald’s bags and dented soda cups.

Loving gestures, long gone. –HARD FROST BY REGINA BUTTNER

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a dying love.

Journaling Prompt: What are some loving things you used to do for your spouse or partner that you don’t do anymore? Why?

Art Prompt: Loving gestures

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about some small things they can do to improve their relationship.

Photo Credit: Dennis S. Hurd on Flickr

Dogmatic individuals hold confidently to their beliefs, even when experts disagree and evidence contradicts them. New research from Case Western Reserve University may help explain the extreme perspectives, on religion, politics and more, that seem increasingly prevalent in society…

“…religious individuals may cling to certain beliefs, especially those which seem at odds with analytic reasoning, because those beliefs resonate with their moral sentiments,” said Jared Friedman, a PhD student in organizational behavior and co-author of the studies.

“Emotional resonance helps religious people to feel more certain — the more moral correctness they see in something, the more it affirms their thinking,” said Anthony Jack, associate professor of philosophy and co-author of the research. “In contrast, moral concerns make nonreligious people feel less certain.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where the conflict is driven by a dogmatic individual who will not listen to another point of view.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a person you know who is driven by dogma and how it affects you.

Art Prompt: Dogmatic person

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the pros and cons of dogma.

Photo Credit: Jake Guild on Flickr

I wanted to be good. I truly did.
Until the day I didn’t. –The Key to St. Medusa’s by Kat Howard

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the prompt as the starting point for a story or a scene.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when you decided to stop following the rules. Do you regret it? What happened?

Art Prompt: I wanted to be good…

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about a time when you decided to break the rules.

Photo Credit: Donnie Nunley on Flickr

“As an emotion, disgust is designed as a protection,” said Vikas Mittal, the J. Hugh Liedtke Professor of Marketing at Rice’s Jones Graduate School of Business. “When people feel disgusted, they tend to remove themselves from a situation. The instinct is to protect oneself. People become focused on ‘self’ and they’re less likely to think about other people. Small cheating starts to occur: If I’m disgusted and more focused on myself and I need to lie a little bit to gain a small advantage, I’ll do that. That’s the underlying mechanism.”

In turn, the researchers found that cleansing behaviors actually mitigate the self-serving effects of disgust. “If you can create conditions where people’s disgust is mitigated, you should not see this (unethical) effect,” Mittal said. “One way to mitigate disgust is to make people think about something clean. If you can make people think of cleaning products — for example, Kleenex or Windex — the emotion of disgust is mitigated, so the likelihood of cheating also goes away. People don’t know it, but these small emotions are constantly affecting them.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene where your protagonist is so disgusted that he or she feels entitled to cheat.

Journaling Prompt: Does the way you feel affect  your integrity? Write about several examples.

Art Prompt: Disgust

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the phenomenon of cheating and what allows people to feel entitled to do it.

Photo Credit: Geoffrey Meyer-van Voorthuijsen on Flickr

Players who received the highest number of penalties — those in the top 10 percent of penalties — had an average of 1.5 arrests per player, including violent and nonviolent arrests. Each player with one arrest averaged 11 penalties and 95 penalty yards. The numbers were higher for those with two or more arrests: Those players averaged 16 penalties and 133 penalty yards each.

“Since our findings revealed a link between workplace behavior and off-duty behavior, it is important for organizations, especially those with a high profile like the NFL, to take seriously their personal conduct policies and to properly screen those they hire for employment, as the actions of any one individual has consequences, both negative and positive, not only for the individual involved but also to the image of the organization,” Nicole Piquero said.

The study found no link between penalties and violent arrests, which, contrary to popular belief, represent a small number of overall arrests among NFL players. In addition, researchers found that players had very few penalties during postseason games, which they believe could be due to the high stakes involved in those games or the fact that referees tend to call fewer penalties during that time. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a pro athlete whose behavior on and off the field is questionable.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about professional athletes who are violent off the field?

Art Prompt: NFL

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the correlation between on and off the field behavior in pro football players.

Photo Credit: Lee Winder on Flickr

Ostracize transitive verb
  • To banish or expel from a community or group;to cast out from social, political, or private favor.
  • [Greek Antiquity] To exile by ostracism; tobanish by a popular vote, as at Athens.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Have you ever felt ostracized or have you ever been part of ostracizing someone else? Write about the experience.

Art Prompt: Ostracize

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Excommunicated Spinoza on Wikimedia

A man can go along obeying all the rules and then it don’t matter a damn anymore. –What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver

Fiction Writing Prompt: Put your protagonist into a situation where the rules don’t apply anymore.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel when the rules are suddenly changed?

Art Prompt: The rules

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about a time that you broke a rule.

Photo Credit: Dr. Zhivago on Flickr

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Drunkenness wa not condemned in the ancient world. It makes men feel like gods, and the Greeks, Romans, Celts, Germanic, Slav and Scandinavian peoples not only felt (like the Amerindians) that they were part of a group of friends and allies in that state, but also that mead was the drink of immortality. No god in any of their pantheons denied himself that liquor. In final homage to the fallen kings whom the Irish sent to their fathers, they were drowned in a vat of mead and their palaces set alight. (If the Celtic mead-maker, particularly in Wales, was not really a seer and healer, he was credited with those powers. Healing, like fermentation, was a magical operation, both of them graciously granted by the gods to the specialists who mediated between them and mankind.) –A History of Food by Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat

Fiction Writing Prompt: How does your character view drunkenness? Add to your character sketch.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about public drunkenness? Private drunkenness?

Art Prompt: Drunkenness

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about differing cultural views on drunkenness.

Photo Credit: Fyodor Petrovich Tolstoy on Wikimedia