Currently viewing the tag: "behavior"

Players who received the highest number of penalties — those in the top 10 percent of penalties — had an average of 1.5 arrests per player, including violent and nonviolent arrests. Each player with one arrest averaged 11 penalties and 95 penalty yards. The numbers were higher for those with two or more arrests: Those players averaged 16 penalties and 133 penalty yards each.

“Since our findings revealed a link between workplace behavior and off-duty behavior, it is important for organizations, especially those with a high profile like the NFL, to take seriously their personal conduct policies and to properly screen those they hire for employment, as the actions of any one individual has consequences, both negative and positive, not only for the individual involved but also to the image of the organization,” Nicole Piquero said.

The study found no link between penalties and violent arrests, which, contrary to popular belief, represent a small number of overall arrests among NFL players. In addition, researchers found that players had very few penalties during postseason games, which they believe could be due to the high stakes involved in those games or the fact that referees tend to call fewer penalties during that time. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a pro athlete whose behavior on and off the field is questionable.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about professional athletes who are violent off the field?

Art Prompt: NFL

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the correlation between on and off the field behavior in pro football players.

Photo Credit: Lee Winder on Flickr

Ostracize transitive verb
  • To banish or expel from a community or group;to cast out from social, political, or private favor.
  • [Greek Antiquity] To exile by ostracism; tobanish by a popular vote, as at Athens.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Have you ever felt ostracized or have you ever been part of ostracizing someone else? Write about the experience.

Art Prompt: Ostracize

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Excommunicated Spinoza on Wikimedia

A man can go along obeying all the rules and then it don’t matter a damn anymore. –What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver

Fiction Writing Prompt: Put your protagonist into a situation where the rules don’t apply anymore.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel when the rules are suddenly changed?

Art Prompt: The rules

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about a time that you broke a rule.

Photo Credit: Dr. Zhivago on Flickr

%d0%b2%d0%b0%d0%ba%d1%85%d0%b8%d1%87%d0%b5%d1%81%d0%ba%d0%b8%d0%b9_%d0%bf%d0%be%d0%b5%d0%b7%d0%b4

Drunkenness wa not condemned in the ancient world. It makes men feel like gods, and the Greeks, Romans, Celts, Germanic, Slav and Scandinavian peoples not only felt (like the Amerindians) that they were part of a group of friends and allies in that state, but also that mead was the drink of immortality. No god in any of their pantheons denied himself that liquor. In final homage to the fallen kings whom the Irish sent to their fathers, they were drowned in a vat of mead and their palaces set alight. (If the Celtic mead-maker, particularly in Wales, was not really a seer and healer, he was credited with those powers. Healing, like fermentation, was a magical operation, both of them graciously granted by the gods to the specialists who mediated between them and mankind.) –A History of Food by Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat

Fiction Writing Prompt: How does your character view drunkenness? Add to your character sketch.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about public drunkenness? Private drunkenness?

Art Prompt: Drunkenness

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about differing cultural views on drunkenness.

Photo Credit: Fyodor Petrovich Tolstoy on Wikimedia

mon self harm

Many people who cut or otherwise injure themselves report that they do so because it provides a sense of relief. Others say they use cutting or other forms of self-injury as a coping mechanism when dealing with a problem or stressful situation. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, people who have a difficult time expressing their feelings may demonstrate their emotional tension, psychical discomfort, pain or low-esteem by engaging in self-injurious behaviors.

While people who engage in NSSI often report feeling a sense of relief upon injuring themselves, many also report that these feelings are quickly replaced by shame or guilt once the relief passes. It is not uncommon for those who engage in self-injurious behaviors to hide their behavior from their peers, parents or teachers or to feel embarrassed or ashamed of the injuries they have inflicted upon themselves. –Live Science

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or scene involving self-harm and include the internal monologue of the character who does it.

Journaling Prompt: How do you take care of yourself when your feelings are overwhelming?

Art Prompt: Self-harm

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the dangers of self-harm and give them tips for talking to someone they love who is trapped in this behavior.

Photo Credit: R N on Flickr

thurs woman

He remembered her voice being magical, the way she carried herself mesmerizing, and her arrival into his boring routine had been as unexpected as the parting of clouds. –Hugh Howey, Wool

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of the woman described in the passage – use prose, poetry, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the first impression you had of someone you now love.

Art Prompt: I remember you…

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story about meeting someone important to you.

Photo Credit: James Rivera on Flickr

sat stop

If I had thought of, if I’d felt any reason at all to stop, I would have. You know I would have stopped. –BREATHLESS • BY GLENN MORI

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when you should have stopped but didn’t.

Art Prompt: Stop!

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about your failure to stop doing something until it was too late.

Photo Credit: faungg’s photos on Flickr

coffee mustache thursday

As he drank, little brown drops of coffee clung to his mustache like dew. Men will live like billy goats if they are let alone. –Charles Portis, True Grit

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write about a man’s habits from the point of view of a woman.

Journaling Prompt: What habit do you judge in your spouse, parent, or friend?

Art Prompt: Men and Billy Goats

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about a bad habit you have.

Photo Credit: Neil Moralee on Flickr

Painters in Winter in Russia

Our drive to create art is so powerful that we find ways to do it under the greatest hardships. In the concentration camps of Germany during World War II, many prisoners spontaneously wrote poetry, composed songs, and painted–activities that, according to Viktor Frankl–gave meaning to the lives of those miserably interred there. Frankl and others have noted that such creativity under exceptional circumstances is not typically the result of a conscious decision on the part of a person to improve his outlook or his life through art. To the contrary, it presents itself as an almost biological need, as essential a drive as that for eating and sleeping–indeed many artists, absorbed in their work temporarily forget all about eating and sleeping. –The World in Six Songs: How the Musical Brain Created Human Nature by Daniel J. Levitin

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of someone who finds healing through art despite their circumstances.

Journaling Prompt: How does creating art of any kind help you in your everyday life?

Art Prompt: Art is Healing

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the creative drive and how they can use it to improve their lives.

Photo Credit: sovraskin on Flickr
Personality

personality building, tower cranes constructing 3d word

Psychologists have boxed our behaviours off into the Big Five personality traits. These describe how we perceive the world internally and how we interact with others…

1) Conscientiousness This relates to your work ethic and organisational skills. Those with this trait plan ahead and aim high. They may also take a great interest in one topic, rather than a passing interest in many.

2) Agreeableness Friendliness and compassion are among the characteristics of an agreeable person. They are also more trustworthy. Agreeableness is also used a measure of how even-tempered a person is.

3) Extraversion Those who score highly for this trait thrive interracting with others. They are extremely talkative, energetic, assertive, and are not fazed by being the centre of attention.

4) Neuroticism A person who scores highly in this area is likely to react negatively to a situation or potential scenario, and will feel more anxious, angry or vulnerable than others.

5) Openness to experience If you fall into this category you have a voracious appetitive for learning about new things, are intellectually curious, highly creative and imaginative. Those who are “open to experience” thrive on spontaneous lifestyles over rigid routines and seek out intense moments. –There are five personality types – which one are you? by Kashmira Gander

Fiction Writing Prompt: Add to your character sketch for your protagonist. Which personality type is he/she? What traits / actions show this trait?

Journaling Prompt: What personality type are you? How do you feel about your type? If you could choose a type, which one would you choose?

Art Prompt: My personality type

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the 5 personality types OR tell your audience a humorous story about yourself based on your personality type.

Photo Credit: Vic on Flickr