Currently viewing the tag: "character sketch"

crazy-chef

…anyone who willingly turns their life upside down by becoming a cook is totally insane to begin with. So many chefs that I have met are dyslexic and totally not school people or intellectuals. That could be symbolic of the kind of lifestyle that they choose to live. They all drink a lot, do a lot of drugs, drink a shitload of coffee and espresso. They don’t sleep much, and obviously don’t have much of a life outside the kitchen. A cook’s friend is a cook, there isn’t much time for a non-cook friend or girlfriend. And time really isn’t the issue so much as it’s a lifestyle and a culture that is very hard to understand or identify with unless you are on the inside. Cooks hang out with cooks because there is nobody else awake, hungry and totally wired at 2 am on a Tuesday. –Jennifer Topper, 29 Jobs and a Million Lies

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story with a chef as a protagonist.

Journaling Prompt: What personality traits do you have that make you perfect for your job?

Art Prompt: Crazy Chef

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how different personalities are attracted to different careers. Give them resources to find their perfect career. 

Photo Credit: Joe Benjamin on Flickr

bear

Be scared. You can’t help that. But don’t be afraid. Ain’t nothing in the woods going to hurt you unless you corner it, or it smells that you are afraid. A bear or a deer, too, has got to be scared of a coward the same as a brave man has got to be. –The Bear by William Faulkner

Fiction Writing Prompt: How does your protagonist react when he or she is afraid? Add to your character sketch.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react when you are scared?

Art Prompt: Don’t be afraid

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous or dramatic story about a scary incident in your life.

Photo Credit: Harald Deischinger on Flickr

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Drunkenness wa not condemned in the ancient world. It makes men feel like gods, and the Greeks, Romans, Celts, Germanic, Slav and Scandinavian peoples not only felt (like the Amerindians) that they were part of a group of friends and allies in that state, but also that mead was the drink of immortality. No god in any of their pantheons denied himself that liquor. In final homage to the fallen kings whom the Irish sent to their fathers, they were drowned in a vat of mead and their palaces set alight. (If the Celtic mead-maker, particularly in Wales, was not really a seer and healer, he was credited with those powers. Healing, like fermentation, was a magical operation, both of them graciously granted by the gods to the specialists who mediated between them and mankind.) –A History of Food by Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat

Fiction Writing Prompt: How does your character view drunkenness? Add to your character sketch.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about public drunkenness? Private drunkenness?

Art Prompt: Drunkenness

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about differing cultural views on drunkenness.

Photo Credit: Fyodor Petrovich Tolstoy on Wikimedia

Monday confidence

Washington State University researcher Joyce Ehrlinger has found that a person’s tendency to be overconfident increases if he or she thinks intelligence is fixed and unchangeable.

Such people tend to maintain their overconfidence by concentrating on the easy parts of tasks while spending as little time as possible on the hard parts of tasks, said Ehrlinger, a WSU assistant professor of psychology. But people who hold a growth mindset–meaning they think intelligence is a changeable quality–spend more time on the challenging parts of tasks, she said. Consequently, their levels of confidence are more in line with their abilities.

Ehrlinger’s research, conducted with Ainsley Mitchum of Florida State University and Carol Dweck of Stanford University, appears in the March edition of the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

“A little bit of overconfidence can be helpful,” said Ehrlinger, “but larger amounts of overconfidence can lead people to make bad decisions and to miss out on opportunities to learn.” The researchers note that overconfidence is a documented problem for drivers, motorcyclists, bungee jumpers, doctors and lawyers. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Add to your character sketch. Does your character have a growth or fixed mindselt? What areas is he/she overconfident in?

Journaling Prompt: When are you overconfident?
Art Prompt: Overconfident

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about growth vs. fixed mindset and how that affect their confidence.

Photo Credit: Chris & Karen Highland on Flickr

laughter

He was born with a gift of laughter and a sense that the world was mad. –Scaramouche, Raphael Sabatini

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about someone you know who has the gift of laughter.

Art Prompt: Laughter

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the health benefits of laughter.

Photo Credit: Photography by Servando Miramontes on Flickr
Personality

personality building, tower cranes constructing 3d word

Psychologists have boxed our behaviours off into the Big Five personality traits. These describe how we perceive the world internally and how we interact with others…

1) Conscientiousness This relates to your work ethic and organisational skills. Those with this trait plan ahead and aim high. They may also take a great interest in one topic, rather than a passing interest in many.

2) Agreeableness Friendliness and compassion are among the characteristics of an agreeable person. They are also more trustworthy. Agreeableness is also used a measure of how even-tempered a person is.

3) Extraversion Those who score highly for this trait thrive interracting with others. They are extremely talkative, energetic, assertive, and are not fazed by being the centre of attention.

4) Neuroticism A person who scores highly in this area is likely to react negatively to a situation or potential scenario, and will feel more anxious, angry or vulnerable than others.

5) Openness to experience If you fall into this category you have a voracious appetitive for learning about new things, are intellectually curious, highly creative and imaginative. Those who are “open to experience” thrive on spontaneous lifestyles over rigid routines and seek out intense moments. –There are five personality types – which one are you? by Kashmira Gander

Fiction Writing Prompt: Add to your character sketch for your protagonist. Which personality type is he/she? What traits / actions show this trait?

Journaling Prompt: What personality type are you? How do you feel about your type? If you could choose a type, which one would you choose?

Art Prompt: My personality type

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the 5 personality types OR tell your audience a humorous story about yourself based on your personality type.

Photo Credit: Vic on Flickr

Dalai Lama Choose to be optimistic, it feels better

Don’t be stuck thinking that there’s only one solution to your problem. –Communion of Dreams by James Downey

Fiction Writing Prompt: What options does your character have to solve his/her problem? What options is he/she not aware of? How could he/she become aware of them?

Journaling Prompt: What problems are you struggling with? What options do you have that might not seem possible. 

Art Prompt: Options

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell  your audience about the idea that there are always more options available than are readily apparent. Give them ideas for brainstorming more options.

Photo Credit: BK on Flickr

Board meeting 2

My way of learning is to heave a wild and unpredictable monkey-wrench into the machinery. –The Maltese Falcon by Dashell Hammett

Fiction Writing Prompt: Add to your character sketch: what is your protagonist’s learning style? How does he or she feel about chaos as a way of getting information?

Journaling Prompt: Describe your favored learning style.

Art Prompt: How I Learn Best

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the basic learning styles and give them at least one way they can use this information to improve their lives.

Photo Credit: Larry Wentzel on Flickr

books

Reading is a habit of mine, not a hobby but a habit. It seems I just can’t get enough. I will read anything. –Color Me Grey by J.C. Phelps

Fiction Writing Prompt: Add to your character sketch: what’s on your protagonist’s reading list?

Journaling Prompt: Write about the last book you read and what you learned from it.

Art Prompt: Reading

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience why leaders are readers.

Photo Credit: Paul on Free Digital Photos

2007-0001-0016

His letters, though suffering like those of some other distinguished authors from being translated, are full of touches of fiery eloquence, mixed with bombast and the wildest and most monstrously inflated self-pretension. His habits certainly were not commendable. He habitually drank, and it is also said ate a great deal more than was good for him. He ill-used his unlucky prisoners. He divorced one wife to marry another, and was eager to have a third in the lifetime of the second, –The Story of Ireland by Emily Lawless

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story using the character sketch above to inspire one of the characters.

Journaling Prompt: What is your routine when you do your journaling? Do you snack? Drink? Doodle? Play music?

Art Prompt: A man of letters and drink

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about the most flamboyant character you’ve ever known.

Photo Credit: john gale on Flickr