Currently viewing the tag: "communication"

Kurwa, she uttered to no one but the wind. It was the foulest word she could say in Polish, so foul she could only bear to say it to people who didn’t speak the language; it was just too vulgar. She used it like English speakers used “fuck,” but kurwa was a much better word. Depending on whom she was talking to and how pleased or pissed off she was at the time, it could mean “whore,” “your mother is a whore,” “bitch,” “bastard,” “cunt,” “prick,” “fuck you,” “fuck off,” “fucker,” or merely “fuck!” Sometimes she said it with a smile on her face to a flirtatious but arrogant climber who didn’t know if she was coming on to him or telling him to get stuffed. She liked that. Keep them wondering. But sometimes she said it in pure disgust to a particular jerk or bastard in her way, like now. –Savage Summit: The Life and Death of the First Women of K2 by Jennifer Jordan

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a female in a male world and the methods she uses to express her true feelings.

Journaling Prompt: What swear words to you enjoy saying? If you don’t swear, what do you say instead?

Art Prompt: Swear word

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of swearing.

Photo Credit: Masa Sakano on Flickr


Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What do you need to listen to?

Art Prompt: Listen

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the skill of listening and how it can help them in their personal life and their career.

Photo Credit: Celine Nadeau on Flickr

Backmasking is a recording technique in which a sound or message is recorded backward onto a track that is meant to be played forward. Backmasking is a deliberate process, whereas a message found through phonetic reversal may be unintentional.

Backmasking was popularised by The Beatles, who used backward instrumentation on their 1966 album Revolver. Artists have since used backmasking for artistic, comedic and satiric effect, on both analogue and digital recordings. The technique has also been used to censor words or phrases for “clean” releases of explicit songs.

Backmasking has been a controversial topic in the United States since the 1970s and popular during the 1980s and 1990s, when allegations from Christian groups of its use for Satanic purposes were made against prominent rock musicians, leading to record-burning protests and proposed anti-backmasking legislation by state and federal governments. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which an unorthodox form of communication is used to disguise the real message.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about hidden messages in music or film?

Art Prompt: Backmasking

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the Beatles scandal with backmasking.

Photo Credit: Scott Schiller on Flickr

IN 1983, THE USS CORAL Sea CV-43 Catapult One was cruising the Atlantic Ocean, and the engineering department discovered a small problem. The ship had an excess of small plastic bottles, meant to test oil. Someone in the department came up with a fun way to deal with the overstock: Let the crew use them to send out messages into the open ocean. –Found: The Owner of a Message-in-a-Bottle Sent in 1983

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a message in a bottle.

Journaling Prompt: If you were writing a message to put in a bottle to set adrift at sea, what would it say?

Art Prompt: Message in a bottle

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story about a message in a bottle.

Photo Credit: World Oregon on Flickr

blandishment
  • Speech or action that flatters and tends to coax, entice, or persuade; allurement — often used in the plural.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the most flattering thing anyone ever said to you.

Art Prompt: Blandishment

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Darren Puttock on Flickr

garrulous
  • Talking much, especially about commonplace or trivial things; talkative.
  • Wordy.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel when you are around a garrulous friend?

Art Prompt: Garrulous

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Béliza Mendes on Flickr

I was sitting in the canteen minding my own business. I had a coffee and a crossword. I swear I wasn’t earwigging, it was just that what she said was arresting. –EARWIGGING BY DEREK MCMILLAN

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What’s the strangest/most interesting thing you’ve overheard in a restaurant?

Art Prompt: Overheard

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about an overheard conversation.

Photo Credit: Frederico Pellachin on Flickr

vituperate
  • To find fault with; to scold; to overwhelm with wordy abuse; to censure severely or abusively; to rate.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about how you feel/have felt when being scolded.

Art Prompt: Vituperate

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: CircaSassy on Flickr

Stuttering, also known as stammering, is a speech disorder in which the flow of speech is disrupted by involuntary repetitions and prolongations of sounds, syllables, words or phrases as well as involuntary silent pauses or blocks in which the person who stutters is unable to produce sounds. The term stuttering is most commonly associated with involuntary sound repetition, but it also encompasses the abnormal hesitation or pausing before speech, referred to by people who stutter as blocks, and the prolongation of certain sounds, usually vowels or semivowels. According to Watkins et al., stuttering is a disorder of “selection, initiation, and execution of motor sequences necessary for fluent speech production.” For many people who stutter, repetition is the primary problem. The term “stuttering” covers a wide range of severity, encompassing barely perceptible impediments that are largely cosmetic to severe symptoms that effectively prevent oral communication. In the world, approximately four times as many men as women stutter, encompassing 70 million people worldwide, or about 1% of the world’s population.

The impact of stuttering on a person’s functioning and emotional state can be severe. This may include fears of having to enunciate specific vowels or consonants, fears of being caught stuttering in social situations, self-imposed isolation, anxiety, stress, shame, being a possible target of bullying (especially in children), having to use word substitution and rearrange words in a sentence to hide stuttering, or a feeling of “loss of control” during speech. Stuttering is sometimes popularly seen as a symptom of anxiety, but there is actually no direct correlation in that direction (though as mentioned the inverse can be true, as social anxiety may actually develop in individuals as a result of their stuttering) –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Give one of your characters a problem with speaking, even if it’s only temporary. Create conflict from this.

Journaling Prompt: Write about how you feel when you are trying to have a conversation with someone with a speech impediment. How do you handle it?

Art Prompt: Stutter

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the problems that someone who stutters face in work and relationships. Give tips for how to hold a conversation with someone who stutters.

Photo Credit: Evan on Flickr

When I was seventeen years old and still living in the seaside town where I spent my childhood, I would go for a few hours every Sunday morning to the home of a retired teacher of English literature to talk about books. –My Life in Middlemarch by Rebecca Mead

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Which of your old teachers would you like to meet to discuss books?

Art Prompt: Seaside Sundays

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about your favorite teacher.

Photo Credit: Paul Townsend on Flickr