Currently viewing the tag: "conflict"

There are long periods in the history of any society during which certain basic questions lead to deep and sharp conflict and it seems difficult if not impossible to find any reasoned common ground for political agreement. –Justice as Fairness: A Restatement by John Rawls

Fiction Writing Prompt: Set a story during a period of sharp conflict.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about the current level of conflict in the world?

Art Prompt: Sharp conflict

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about a conflict caused by disagreement on a basic question.

Photo Credit: Mark Theriot on Flickr

Fighting in ice hockey is an established tradition of the sport in North America, with a long history that involves many levels of amateur and professional play and includes some notable individual fights. Fighting is usually performed by enforcers, or “goons”—players whose role is to fight and intimidate—on a given team, and is governed by a complex system of unwritten rules that players, coaches, officials, and the media refer to as “the code”. Some fights are spontaneous, while others are premeditated by the participants. While officials tolerate fighting during hockey games, they impose a variety of penalties on players who engage in fights.

Unique among North American professional team sports, the National Hockey League (NHL) and most minor professional leagues in North America do not eject players outright for fighting (although they may do so for more flagrant violations as part of a fight) but major European and collegiate hockey leagues do, and multi-game suspensions may be added on top of the ejection. Therefore, the vast majority of fights occur in the NHL and other North American professional leagues. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about fights in professional sports?

Art Prompt: Hockey

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of fighting in hockey.

Photo Credit: slgckgc on Flickr

Arrived too late, the act has been done.
The wind was against them, letters intercepted on their way.
The conspirators were fourteen of a party. –Nostradumas

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a failed conspiracy.

Journaling Prompt: What’s your favorite conspiracy theory?

Art Prompt: Conspirators

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about a failed conspiracy.

Photo Credit: katie hargrave on Flickr

Small mushroom clouds were not a particularly uncommon sight around the increasingly smaller suburban village of Opahi, and special rules permitted the residents to always have one NanoNuke in their possession, for the sake of protection of course. With mutually assured destruction, having a personal atomic weapon kept things a little bit more peaceful somehow, and just a little bit calmer as well. Disputes actually resolved themselves very quickly. Of course, if they didn’t, one of the parties in the said dispute wasn’t exactly around anymore to continue it. –MAD Men by Corey Ethan Sutch

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set in a world where everyone has a button that can kill anyone they get angry with.

Journaling Prompt: Would you want to have the power to launch a nuclear weapon?

Art Prompt: NanoNukes

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the strategy of Mutually Assured Destruction and how it works.

berate
  • To scold severely or angrily.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about how you felt when being berated. How do you cope with angry people?

Art Prompt: Berate

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Neal on Flickr

When the litters are overturned by the whirlwind
and faces are covered by cloaks,
the new republic will be troubled by its people.
At this time the reds and the whites will rule wrongly.
Nostradamus

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a revolution.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about protests?

Art Prompt: Protest

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of a protest that changed history.

Photo Credit: lio leiser on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

The Bone Wars, also known as the Great Dinosaur Rush, was a period of intense and ruthlessly competitive fossil hunting and discovery during the Gilded Age of American history, marked by a heated rivalry between Edward Drinker Cope (of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia) and Othniel Charles Marsh (of the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale). Each of the two paleontologists used underhanded methods to try to outdo the other in the field, resorting to bribery, theft, and destruction of bones. Each scientist also sought to ruin his rival’s reputation and cut off his funding using attacks in scientific publications. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which scientific rivalry drives the conflict.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about scientists feuding? Do you feel it advances science or holds it back?

Art Prompt: Bone wars

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of a famous scientific rivalry.

Photo Credit: Como Bluff expedition members on Wikimedia

In a survey of 1,308 U.S. adult Facebook users, University of British Columbia researchers found that 24 per cent — or more than one in five — had snooped on the Facebook accounts of their friends, romantic partners or family members, using the victims’ own computers or cellphones.

“It’s clearly a widespread practice. Facebook private messages, pictures or videos are easy targets when the account owner is already logged on and has left their computer or mobile open for viewing,” said Wali Ahmed Usmani, study author and computer science master’s student.

People admitted to spying on their friends, family, and romantic partners out of simple curiosity or fun — for example, setting a victim’s status or profile picture to something humorous. But other motives were darker, such as jealousy or animosity.

“Jealous snoops generally plan their action and focus on personal messages, accessing the account for 15 minutes or longer,” said computer science professor Ivan Beschastnikh, a senior author on the paper.

“And the consequences are significant: in many cases, snooping effectively ended the relationship.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where the conflict is driven by Facebook snooping.

Journaling Prompt: How would you feel if you found out someone you trusted was snooping through your private messages?

Art Prompt: Facebook snooping

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the phenomenon of Facebook snooping and give them the steps to prevent it from happening to them.

Photo Credit: York VISIOn on Flickr

The Sydney Riot of 1879 was a civil disorder that occurred at an early international cricket match. It took place in Sydney, Australia, at the Association Ground, Moore Park, now known as the Sydney Cricket Ground, during a match between a touring English team captained by Lord Harris and New South Wales, led by Dave Gregory, who was also the captain of Australia.

The riot was sparked by a controversial umpiring decision, when star Australian batsman Billy Murdoch was given out by George Coulthard, a Victorian employed by the Englishmen. The dismissal caused an uproar among the parochial spectators, many of whom surged onto the pitch and assaulted Coulthard and some English players. It was alleged that illegal gamblers in the New South Wales pavilion, who had bet heavily on the home side, encouraged the riot because the tourists were in a dominant position and looked set to win. Another theory given to explain the anger was that of intercolonial rivalry, that the New South Wales crowd objected to what they perceived to be a slight from a Victorian umpire. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a riot at a sporting event and the fallout from it.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react to bad calls in a close sports match?

Art Prompt: Cricket

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of riots at sporting events and talk about the psychology of this phenomenon.

Photo Credit: Association Ground Sydney on Wikimedia Commons