Currently viewing the tag: "conflict"

When the litters are overturned by the whirlwind
and faces are covered by cloaks,
the new republic will be troubled by its people.
At this time the reds and the whites will rule wrongly.
Nostradamus

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a revolution.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about protests?

Art Prompt: Protest

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of a protest that changed history.

Photo Credit: lio leiser on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

The Bone Wars, also known as the Great Dinosaur Rush, was a period of intense and ruthlessly competitive fossil hunting and discovery during the Gilded Age of American history, marked by a heated rivalry between Edward Drinker Cope (of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia) and Othniel Charles Marsh (of the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale). Each of the two paleontologists used underhanded methods to try to outdo the other in the field, resorting to bribery, theft, and destruction of bones. Each scientist also sought to ruin his rival’s reputation and cut off his funding using attacks in scientific publications. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which scientific rivalry drives the conflict.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about scientists feuding? Do you feel it advances science or holds it back?

Art Prompt: Bone wars

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of a famous scientific rivalry.

Photo Credit: Como Bluff expedition members on Wikimedia

In a survey of 1,308 U.S. adult Facebook users, University of British Columbia researchers found that 24 per cent — or more than one in five — had snooped on the Facebook accounts of their friends, romantic partners or family members, using the victims’ own computers or cellphones.

“It’s clearly a widespread practice. Facebook private messages, pictures or videos are easy targets when the account owner is already logged on and has left their computer or mobile open for viewing,” said Wali Ahmed Usmani, study author and computer science master’s student.

People admitted to spying on their friends, family, and romantic partners out of simple curiosity or fun — for example, setting a victim’s status or profile picture to something humorous. But other motives were darker, such as jealousy or animosity.

“Jealous snoops generally plan their action and focus on personal messages, accessing the account for 15 minutes or longer,” said computer science professor Ivan Beschastnikh, a senior author on the paper.

“And the consequences are significant: in many cases, snooping effectively ended the relationship.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where the conflict is driven by Facebook snooping.

Journaling Prompt: How would you feel if you found out someone you trusted was snooping through your private messages?

Art Prompt: Facebook snooping

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the phenomenon of Facebook snooping and give them the steps to prevent it from happening to them.

Photo Credit: York VISIOn on Flickr

The Sydney Riot of 1879 was a civil disorder that occurred at an early international cricket match. It took place in Sydney, Australia, at the Association Ground, Moore Park, now known as the Sydney Cricket Ground, during a match between a touring English team captained by Lord Harris and New South Wales, led by Dave Gregory, who was also the captain of Australia.

The riot was sparked by a controversial umpiring decision, when star Australian batsman Billy Murdoch was given out by George Coulthard, a Victorian employed by the Englishmen. The dismissal caused an uproar among the parochial spectators, many of whom surged onto the pitch and assaulted Coulthard and some English players. It was alleged that illegal gamblers in the New South Wales pavilion, who had bet heavily on the home side, encouraged the riot because the tourists were in a dominant position and looked set to win. Another theory given to explain the anger was that of intercolonial rivalry, that the New South Wales crowd objected to what they perceived to be a slight from a Victorian umpire. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a riot at a sporting event and the fallout from it.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react to bad calls in a close sports match?

Art Prompt: Cricket

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of riots at sporting events and talk about the psychology of this phenomenon.

Photo Credit: Association Ground Sydney on Wikimedia Commons

The Manhattan Project was a research and development undertaking during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons. It was led by the United States with the support of the United Kingdom and Canada. From 1942 to 1946, the project was under the direction of Major General Leslie Groves of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Nuclear physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer was the director of the Los Alamos Laboratory that designed the actual bombs. The Army component of the project was designated the Manhattan District; “Manhattan” gradually superseded the official codename, Development of Substitute Materials, for the entire project. Along the way, the project absorbed its earlier British counterpart, Tube Alloys. The Manhattan Project began modestly in 1939, but grew to employ more than 130,000 people and cost nearly US $2 billion (about $27 billion in 2016[1] dollars). Over 90% of the cost was for building factories and to produce fissile material, with less than 10% for development and production of the weapons. Research and production took place at more than 30 sites across the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or poem about the secret development of a new weapon.

Journaling Prompt: Write about how you feel that we have the ability to destroy ourselves and the planet.

Art Prompt: Manhattan Project

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the Manhattan Project.

Photo Credit: Trinity shot on Wikimedia

…research shows many people have homicidal thoughts or fantasies (as many as 79 percent of men and 66 percent of women in a 1993 survey of university students), DeLisi said. It becomes a problem when those thoughts progress to contemplating situations in which homicide is appropriate, forecasting consequences of murder or simulating the act of killing.

“For most people, the thoughts are short-lived and related to a dispute. They may think about killing someone instantaneously, but once they cool down they’re OK,” DeLisi said. “For correctional clients, it’s part of their emotional life. They have a lot of anger, hostility and psychopathology. They think people are out to get them and they’re very aggressive, so some of these severe offenders contemplate homicide.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of someone who escalates from contemplation to execution of a homicide and the aftermath.

Journaling Prompt: Have you ever fantasied about hurting someone? Write about that experience, however brief it may have been. What did you learn about yourself?

Art Prompt: Fantasies

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how dangerous fantasies can be and how to deal with them when they happen.

Photo Credit: Andy on Flickr

Mom and Dad are cheerful, almost giddy, because Granny’s having a good day: not throwing things, not screaming that she hates Dad, that she’d rather be dead. –Tomorrow Is Winter by Callie Snow

Fiction Writing Prompt: Tell the story of an elderly person who terrorizes his/her family.

Journaling Prompt: Describe your parents’ relationships with their parents. How does this affect you?

Art Prompt: Granny’s having a good day

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the issues with eldercare in our society.

Photo Credit: xxx on Flickr

foment 

  • To nurse to life or activity; to incite; to abet; to instigate; — often in a bad sense.
  • Fomentation; the act of fomenting.
  • State of excitation.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react when someone is trying to stir the pot?

Art Prompt: Foment

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: OperationPaperStorm on Flickr

On March 3, 1993, Saint Joseph Academy high school senior Joey Fischer was shot dead outside his home in Rancho Viejo, an upscale community north of Brownsville, Texas. Dora Cisneros, the mother of his ex-girlfriend, was convicted of orchestrating Fischer’s murder after he broke up with her daughter Cristina. Fischer and Cristina had broken up the previous summer, but Cisneros became obsessed with their relationship and insisted Fischer return to her. After Fischer refused a US$500 offer from Cisneros, she consulted María Mercedes Martínez, a fortuneteller, to cast a spell on him.

The fortuneteller said she was not able to do that, but Cisneros insisted that she would pay to have someone beat him up. Cisneros later decided to have Fischer murdered instead and told Martínez she was willing to pay US$3,000 to anyone who would kill him. Martínez offered to help and Cisneros gave her the money and a photograph of Fischer, who passed it on to one of Martínez’s clients, Daniel Orlando Garza. He then contacted two Mexican hitmen from Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Israel Olivarez Cepeda and Heriberto Puentes Pizaña, who shot Fischer and then escaped to Mexico. The killing drew national attention because of the unusual circumstances of the crime.

Garza, troubled by what he had done, confessed to the police that he had acted as a middleman in Fischer’s murder. He cooperated with the police to incriminate Martínez, who then aided in Cisneros’ arrest. Cisneros and Garza were eventually sentenced to life in prison by a state court in 1994, but Cisneros’ sentence was overturned due to a legal technicality. She was convicted again in 1998 by a federal court and sentenced to life in prison. Martínez was given a 20-year sentence after pleading guilty and testifying against the two in court. Though U.S. officials tried to have the two assassins extradited, the hitmen never faced trial in Texas. They were prosecuted in Mexico and handed a 15-year sentence. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story from the POV of a middleman in a murder plot

Journaling Prompt: If you could kill someone and get away with it, would you? 

Art Prompt: Murder!

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of a murder in your town.

Photo Credit: Henry Marion on Flickr