Currently viewing the tag: "death"

The death of a stranger on the mountain is like a motorway accident. You’re aware of it, but you drive on…. I don’t believe that any dead colleague would want the survivors robbed of their chances [at the summit]. –Savage Summit by Jennifer Jordan

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or scene where the protagonist makes a choice that seems cruel.

Journaling Prompt: What decision have you regretted and why did you make it?

Art Prompt: Death of a stranger

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about deaths in mountaineering and the “code of the mountain.”

Photo Credit: YouTube

The corpse hotel is called LastTel, which is short for Last Hotel. Cremation is 99 percent in Japan. But sometimes, in a huge city like Tokyo, there aren’t enough machines so it can sometimes take days or a week to have the cremation. In Japan, it’s important to sit, pray, and be with the body, so the Last Hotel is a place where there’s access day and night.

The piece de resistance is the condominium. It’s got futon mats to sleep on, a microwave and shower, the whole condo deal. They then slide your corpse into the room, and the family can be there and hang out with the dead body. –Burn, Mummify, Compost—Different Ways to Treat the Dead by Simon Worrall

Fiction Writing Prompt: Create a death ritual for the world of your story. How has/will this affect your protagonist?

Journaling Prompt: How do you want your body handled when you die? What kind of services do you want?

Art Prompt: Death

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about different cultural traditions surrounding death.

Photo Credit: Jerome Rothermund on Flickr

KNOWING THAT YOU’D GOTTEN your own self into a mess wasn’t all that much consolation when you were about to die. –Anna Elliott, The Witch Queen’s Secret

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of someone who is in a mess of their own making.

Journaling Prompt: What’s the worst mess you ever got into and how did you get out of it?

Art Prompt: About to die

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about getting yourself into and out of a mess.

Photo Credit: Delyth Angharad  on Flickr

From at least the 1100s to the early 1800s, men and women were judged in courts across Europe and colonial America based on a test called cruentation, or the ordeal of the bier, named for the type of wagon that carried a corpse or coffin.

In such testimony, oozing knife wounds and gushes of blood from the noses and eyes of the deceased were considered proof positive of guilt. –How ‘Talking’ Corpses Were Once Used to Solve Murders by Erika Engelhaupt

Fiction Writing Prompt: Create a superstition around dead bodies for the world of your story.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about dead bodies? Have you ever seen one?

Art Prompt: Talking corpses

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of fortune telling through the use of corpses.

Photo Credit: Surian Soosay on Flickr

The same year my father got sick I published a novel in which I killed him. –Father and Son: A Lifetime by Marcos Giralt Torrente

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What is the worst thing you ever wished for that came true, and how did you feel afterwards?

Art Prompt: Funeral

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic or humorous story about a wish come true.

Photo Credit: brownpau on Flickr

Most men in my family make widows of their wives and orphans of their children. –Enon by Paul Harding

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What is the riskiest behavior that your significant other has ever engaged in? How did it make you feel?

Art Prompt: Risky business

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story in which someone almost pays the ultimate price.

Photo Credit: Andreas Bjärlestam on Flickr

The gondola dipped to the high-town landing and I climbed out. I carried no baggage, sent ahead to the pension, except memory. Childhood, youth, young manhood. The little war, the famous siege that nearly killed me. I was lucky, they said, the doctors, when I woke in the field hospital of the international forces. Lucky. –Two Dead Men by ALEX JEFFERS

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a lucky man who arrives back to the scene of his near death experience.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the most interesting way you have ever travelled.

Art Prompt: Gondola ride

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about an escape from death.

Photo Credit: Kim Olson on Flickr

It had been 297 days since David died. And 297 since he’d come back, gasped and sat up in a base camp hospital tent covered in warming pads, the defibrillator still buzzing in the medic’s hands, his teeth chattering with cold. –Warm Up by V.E. Schwab

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where your protagonist has a near death experience.

Journaling Prompt: Write about what happened in your life 297 days ago.

Art Prompt: 297 days

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about a near death experience.

Photo Credit: plenty.r. on Flickr

It was a big hole, deep, long, narrow. –A FUNERAL IN WINTER BY CYNDETH K. ALLISON

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a funeral you attended recently.

Art Prompt: Open grave

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about your cultures practices for handling the body after death.

Photo Credit: Alex on Flickr

I am dust. Particles in a shiny urn. But I’m not alone in here. There are a few fragments left over from the previous inhabitants of the ferocious incinerator. I don’t mind; it’s nice having some company. –Disposition of Remains by Laura T Emery

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What do you believe happens after you die?

Art Prompt: Urn

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about different cultural practices about handling the body after death.

Photo Credit: David J on Flickr