Currently viewing the tag: "death"

From at least the 1100s to the early 1800s, men and women were judged in courts across Europe and colonial America based on a test called cruentation, or the ordeal of the bier, named for the type of wagon that carried a corpse or coffin.

In such testimony, oozing knife wounds and gushes of blood from the noses and eyes of the deceased were considered proof positive of guilt. –How ‘Talking’ Corpses Were Once Used to Solve Murders by Erika Engelhaupt

Fiction Writing Prompt: Create a superstition around dead bodies for the world of your story.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about dead bodies? Have you ever seen one?

Art Prompt: Talking corpses

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of fortune telling through the use of corpses.

Photo Credit: Surian Soosay on Flickr

The same year my father got sick I published a novel in which I killed him. –Father and Son: A Lifetime by Marcos Giralt Torrente

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What is the worst thing you ever wished for that came true, and how did you feel afterwards?

Art Prompt: Funeral

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic or humorous story about a wish come true.

Photo Credit: brownpau on Flickr

Most men in my family make widows of their wives and orphans of their children. –Enon by Paul Harding

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What is the riskiest behavior that your significant other has ever engaged in? How did it make you feel?

Art Prompt: Risky business

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story in which someone almost pays the ultimate price.

Photo Credit: Andreas Bjärlestam on Flickr

The gondola dipped to the high-town landing and I climbed out. I carried no baggage, sent ahead to the pension, except memory. Childhood, youth, young manhood. The little war, the famous siege that nearly killed me. I was lucky, they said, the doctors, when I woke in the field hospital of the international forces. Lucky. –Two Dead Men by ALEX JEFFERS

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a lucky man who arrives back to the scene of his near death experience.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the most interesting way you have ever travelled.

Art Prompt: Gondola ride

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about an escape from death.

Photo Credit: Kim Olson on Flickr

It had been 297 days since David died. And 297 since he’d come back, gasped and sat up in a base camp hospital tent covered in warming pads, the defibrillator still buzzing in the medic’s hands, his teeth chattering with cold. –Warm Up by V.E. Schwab

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where your protagonist has a near death experience.

Journaling Prompt: Write about what happened in your life 297 days ago.

Art Prompt: 297 days

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about a near death experience.

Photo Credit: plenty.r. on Flickr

It was a big hole, deep, long, narrow. –A FUNERAL IN WINTER BY CYNDETH K. ALLISON

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a funeral you attended recently.

Art Prompt: Open grave

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about your cultures practices for handling the body after death.

Photo Credit: Alex on Flickr

I am dust. Particles in a shiny urn. But I’m not alone in here. There are a few fragments left over from the previous inhabitants of the ferocious incinerator. I don’t mind; it’s nice having some company. –Disposition of Remains by Laura T Emery

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What do you believe happens after you die?

Art Prompt: Urn

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about different cultural practices about handling the body after death.

Photo Credit: David J on Flickr

[Johnny] Cash was very close to his older brother, Jack. In May 1944, Jack was pulled into a whirling head saw in the mill where he worked and was almost cut in two. He suffered for over a week before he died on May 20, 1944, at age 15. Cash often spoke of the horrible guilt he felt over this incident. According to Cash: The Autobiography, his father was away that morning, but he and his mother, and Jack himself, all had premonitions or a sense of foreboding about that day, causing his mother to urge Jack to skip work and go fishing with his brother. Jack insisted on working, as the family needed the money. On his deathbed, Jack said he had visions of Heaven and angels. Decades later, Cash spoke of looking forward to meeting his brother in Heaven. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of brothers who are separated by tragedy.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your relationship with a sibling.

Art Prompt: Brotherly love

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about Johnny Cash’s tragic history.

Photo Credit: Jack Cash’s Gravestone on Wikimedia

Jesse Woodson James (September 5, 1847 – April 3, 1882) was an American outlaw, guerrilla, gang leader, bank robber, train robber, and murderer from the state of Missouri and the most famous member of the James-Younger Gang. Jesse and his brother Frank James were Confederate guerrillas or bushwhackers during the Civil War. They were accused of participating in atrocities committed against Union soldiers, including the Centralia Massacre. After the war, as members of various gangs of outlaws, they robbed banks, stagecoaches, and trains.

The James brothers were most active as members of their own gang from about 1866 until 1876, when as a result of their attempted robbery of a bank in Northfield, Minnesota, several members of the gang were captured or killed. They continued in crime for several years, recruiting new members, but were under increasing pressure from law enforcement. On April 3, 1882, Jesse James was killed by Robert Ford, a member of his own gang who hoped to collect a reward on James’ head. Already a celebrity when he was alive, James became a legendary figure of the Wild West after his death. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about an infamous gang of thieves.

Journaling Prompt: If you could go back in time to meet any famous criminal, who would you want to meet?

Art Prompt: Jesse James

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the life of Jesse James.

Photo Credit: Jesse and Frank James on Wikimedia

henry_triggs_coffin

Trigg was a prosperous grocer with a twin-gabled shop in Middle Row, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, as well as a number of other properties. He was a church warden, an overseer of the parish, and an important man locally. It is said that one night, he and two friends witnessed grave robbers at a local graveyard, and they vowed to make sure that this would not happen to them. Trigg stated in his will that his body should be committed for a minimum of 30 years to “the West end of my Hovel to be decently laid there upon a floor erected by my Executor, upon the purlin for the same purpose, nothing doubting but that at the general Resurrection, I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God.” According to Gentleman’s Magazine of 5 Feb 1751, Trigg’s will stated that he supposed that he would return to life after 30 years and then his estate would revert to him, and that he ordered that the barn be locked with the key inside his coffin so that he could let himself out. Shortly before he died, Trigg had negotiated with the parish authorities to rent his barn as the town’s workhouse…

Trigg died in Letchworth, Hertfordshire on 6 October 1724 before renovations could be carried out on his barn… Therefore, his remains were placed in a lead-lined coffin of oak and pine and hoisted into the rafters of the barn behind the shop, about 10 feet (3.0 m) above the ground.
Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of an unusual will provision.

Journaling Prompt: What do you want done with your body after you die?

Art Prompt: Grave robbers

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the strange story of Henry Trigg’s coffin.

Photo Credit: Henry Trigg’s coffin on Wikimedia