Currently viewing the tag: "disappearances"

The first record that something was untoward on the Flannan Isles was on 15 December 1900 when the steamer Archtor, on a passage from Philadelphia to Leith, noted in its log that the light was not operational in poor weather conditions… The lighthouse was manned by three men: Thomas Marshall, James Ducat, and Donald MacArthur, with a rotating fourth man spending time on shore.

On arrival, the crew and relief keeper found that the flagstaff had no flag, none of the usual provision boxes had been left on the landing stage for re-stocking, and more ominously, none of the lighthouse keepers were there to welcome them ashore. Jim Harvie, captain of Hesperus, gave a strident blast on his whistle and set off a distress flare but no reply was forthcoming.

A boat was launched and Joseph Moore, the relief keeper, was put ashore alone. He found the entrance gate to the compound and main door both closed, the beds unmade, and the clock stopped. Returning to the landing stage with this grim news, he then went back up to the lighthouse with Hesperus’s second-mate and a seaman. A further search revealed that the lamps were cleaned and refilled. A set of oilskins was found, suggesting that one of the keepers had left the lighthouse without them, which was surprising considering the severity of the weather on the date of the last entry in the lighthouse log. The only sign of anything amiss in the lighthouse was an overturned chair by the kitchen table. There was no sign of any of the keepers, neither inside the lighthouse nor anywhere on the island.

Moore and three volunteer seamen were left to attend the light……the men scoured every corner of the island for clues as to the fate of the keepers. They found that everything was intact at the east landing but the west landing provided considerable evidence of damage caused by recent storms. A box at 33 metres (108 ft) above sea level had been broken and its contents strewn about; iron railings were bent over, the iron railway by the path was wrenched out of its concrete, and a rock weighing more than a ton had been displaced above that. On top of the cliff at more than 60 metres (200 ft) above sea level, turf had been ripped away as far as 10 metres (33 ft) from the cliff edge. The missing keepers had kept their log until 9 a.m. on 15 December. The entries made it clear that the damage had occurred before their disappearance –Wikipedia
Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about people who go missing and the search for what happened.

Journaling Prompt: What have you lost that you have never been able to find?

Art Prompt: Lost without a trace

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the Flannan Isle lighthouse keepers’ disappearance.

Photo Credit: The lighthouse on Eilean Mor on Wikimedia

Mary_Celeste_as_Amazon_in_1861

The Mary Celeste (or Marie Céleste as it is fictionally referred to by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and others after him) was a British-American merchant brigantine famous for having been discovered on 4 December 1872 in the Atlantic Ocean, unmanned and apparently abandoned (one lifeboat was missing, along with its 7 crew), although the weather was fine and her crew had been experienced and capable seamen. The Mary Celeste was in seaworthy condition and still under sail heading toward the Strait of Gibraltar. She had been at sea for a month and had over six months’ worth of food and water on board. Her cargo was virtually untouched and the personal belongings of passengers and crew were still in place, including valuables. The crew was never seen or heard from again. The Mary Celeste crew’s disappearance is often cited as the greatest maritime mystery of all time. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a mysterious disappearance.

Journaling Prompt: What is your favorite unsolved mystery and why?

Art Prompt: Mary Celeste

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about your favorite unsolved mystery and share your favorite hypothesis for what really happened.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

Menhirs de Colobrière

It wasn’t a very likely place for disappearances, at least at first glance. Diana Gabaldon, Outlander

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a disappearance.

Journaling Prompt: If you were going to disappear, where and when would you want to go?

Art Prompt: Disappearance

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about a famous disappearance.

Photo Credit: Tets07 on Flickr