Currently viewing the tag: "emotions"

…researchers assessed each individual’s homelessness, inpatient mental-health treatment, psychological symptoms of mental illness, substance use and as victims or perpetrators of violence. The researchers evaluated all of these items as both indicators and outcomes — i.e., as both causes and effects.

“We found that all of these indicators mattered, but often in different ways,” says Sarah Desmarais, an associate professor of psychology at NC State and co-author of the paper. “For example, drug use was a leading indicator of committing violence, while alcohol use was a leading indicator of being a victim of violence.”

However, the researchers also found that one particular category of psychological symptoms was also closely associated with violence: affective symptoms.

“By affect, we mean symptoms including anxiety, depressive symptoms and poor impulse control,” Desmarais says. “The more pronounced affective symptoms were, the more likely someone was to both commit violence and be a victim of violence…

…on average, the researchers found that one event in which a person was a victim of violence triggered seven other effects, such as psychological symptoms, homelessness and becoming perpetrators of violence. Those seven effects, on average, triggered an additional 39 additional effects.

“It’s a complex series of interactions that spirals over time, exacerbating substance use, mental-health problems and violent behavior,” Van Dorn says. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a protagonist with poor impulse control and high anxiety.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the state of your mental health and how it affects your behavior.

Art Prompt: Mental Illness and Violence

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell  your audience about the complicated relationship between mental illness and violence.

Photo Credit: Alvaro Tapia on Flickr

She was beautiful when she was angry, and she was more than beautiful today. –Celtic Skies by Delaney Rhodes

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about someone who is in love with an angry woman.

Journaling Prompt: How do you act when you get angry.

Art Prompt: My anger

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a story about a time when you got angry and what you learned from that experience.

Photo Credit: Matthew Kenwrick on Flickr

He gathered her unbound hair and started working through it with the comb from the top of her head down to its ends, which brushed the floor. It was impossible to concentrate on anything except the warmth of his breath on her neck, the way his fingers brushed against her back, or her arms, or the lobe of her ear. This state of suspension, him brushing and her sitting so still lest she utter his name or throw herself into his arms, was almost painful, and yet she dared not move for fear of breaking the connection. Anji was a patient man, very disciplined, and she began to wonder if he meant to comb her hair all night just to see who would break first. And because she was so very tired, and wrung tight, and aching with misery and hope, she began to laugh, a little hysterically perhaps, but laughter all the same even if there were sobs caught in it. He set the comb on the tray. “Enough, Mai,” he said, his voice husky with desire, perhaps with satisfaction, perhaps with anger still simmering. He embraced her, pulling her close. “Enough.” –Kate Elliott, Traitors’ Gate

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene or poem about a couple who has had a fight and how they make up.

Journaling Prompt: How do you make a conciliatory gesture after a fight?

Art Prompt: Making up

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about a fight you had with someone important to you.

Photo Credit: Pray for Peaceful Dream on Flickr

An old therapeutic axiom in Gestalt psychology, which also lies at the very heart of shamanism and contemplative mysticism worldwide, suggests that the healing of a wound must come from the blood of the wound itself. In other words, the healing of an emotional or psychospiritual wound is brought about precisely by entering into its terrain, not by avoiding it. –The Mist-Filled Path: Celtic Wisdom for Exiles, Wanderers, and Seekers by Frank MacEowen

Fiction Writing Prompt: What is your protagonist’s wound, and what will he or she have to do to enter it and heal it?

Journaling Prompt: Write about an emotional wound that you need to heal. What will you have to do to get the courage to enter into that healing?

Art Prompt: Entering the wound

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about shamanism or comtemplative mysticism and give them one thing that they can learn from those traditions.

Photo Credit: Janice L. on Flickr

fragileheart

…destiny permits no one to continue in blissful happiness. Fate could not tolerate it. Something trivial, a glance, a word, a touch, could shatter a friendship. A love deemed deep and lasting was so fragile it could disappear like straw in the wind. –The Contessa’s Vendetta: A Novel of Betrayal and Revenge by Mirella Sichirollo Patzer

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or poem inspired by a twist of fate.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when your happiness was shattered suddenly.

Art Prompt: Fragile fate

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story about a twist of fate.

Photo Credit: masaru minoya on Flickr

bear

Be scared. You can’t help that. But don’t be afraid. Ain’t nothing in the woods going to hurt you unless you corner it, or it smells that you are afraid. A bear or a deer, too, has got to be scared of a coward the same as a brave man has got to be. –The Bear by William Faulkner

Fiction Writing Prompt: How does your protagonist react when he or she is afraid? Add to your character sketch.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react when you are scared?

Art Prompt: Don’t be afraid

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous or dramatic story about a scary incident in your life.

Photo Credit: Harald Deischinger on Flickr

mon-infidelity

Infidelity can lead to relationship dissatisfaction and breakdown, though in some cases the problems may be caused by the different ways in which individuals define infidelity. The authors, based in the USA, sought to better understand potential perceptions of infidelity. They found that “women were more likely than men to identify both sexual-based and emotion-based acts as constituting infidelity.”…

The authors suggest that their finding that women were more likely to identify certain acts as infidelity is unsurprising given that the women scored higher than the men on measures of ‘communion’ — “the extent to which a person wants to form and maintain positive interpersonal bonds.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where the conflict derives from a difference in opinion on what constitutes infidelity.

Journaling Prompt: How do you define infidelity? What are your expectations for your partner’s behavior?

Art Prompt: Infidelity

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the difference between how men and women perceive infidelity.

Photo Credit: cometstarmoon on Flickr

mon self harm

Many people who cut or otherwise injure themselves report that they do so because it provides a sense of relief. Others say they use cutting or other forms of self-injury as a coping mechanism when dealing with a problem or stressful situation. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, people who have a difficult time expressing their feelings may demonstrate their emotional tension, psychical discomfort, pain or low-esteem by engaging in self-injurious behaviors.

While people who engage in NSSI often report feeling a sense of relief upon injuring themselves, many also report that these feelings are quickly replaced by shame or guilt once the relief passes. It is not uncommon for those who engage in self-injurious behaviors to hide their behavior from their peers, parents or teachers or to feel embarrassed or ashamed of the injuries they have inflicted upon themselves. –Live Science

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or scene involving self-harm and include the internal monologue of the character who does it.

Journaling Prompt: How do you take care of yourself when your feelings are overwhelming?

Art Prompt: Self-harm

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the dangers of self-harm and give them tips for talking to someone they love who is trapped in this behavior.

Photo Credit: R N on Flickr

tues secret

All secrets are deep. All secrets become dark. That’s in the nature of secrets. –Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town by Cory Doctorow

Fiction Writing Prompt: Add to your character sketch. What is your protagonist’s dark secret? How does it drive his/her actions? How does it color how he/she sees the world?

Journaling Prompt: Write about a secret you haven’t told anyone. What do you believe would happen if someone else knew?

Art Prompt: Dark Secret

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the power of secrets to stunt your life and give them tips for letting go of them.

Photo Credit: Araí Moleri Riva-Zucchelli on Flickr

Samuel_F_B_Morse_gravure

In February 1825, [Samuel] Morse was in Washington, D.C. He was an itinerant painter, a good one, but he wasn’t making a solid living with his art. At age 34, he was older than his heroes had been when they created their masterpieces. Morse had traveled to Washington to pursue what could’ve been his big break: The city of New York promised him a $1,000 commission to paint Marquis de Lafayette, who was returning as a hero to the country he helped make free.

“We must begin to feel proud of your acquaintance,” Morse’s wife, Lucretia, wrote to him from their home in New Haven, Connecticut, a four-day trip away. She was expecting their third child. “I think now that we can indulge a rational hope that the time is not very far distant when you can be happy in the bosom of your much loved family,” she wrote.

And Morse indulged that hope. As he worked in Washington, he wrote to Lucretia, “I long to hear from you.”
But he wouldn’t hear from her. Lucretia, at the time Morse wrote to her, was dead. –The Heartbreak That May Have Inspired the Telegraph by Gabe Bullard

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about an invention inspired by a strong emotion.

Journaling Prompt: What would you invent in order to feel closer to someone you love?

Art Prompt: Telegraph

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about Samuel Morse.