Currently viewing the tag: "emotions"

They say cancer runs in the family. In our family, it doesn’t run so much as chase. It caught my mom the year I turned thirty. I feel like I became her as I watched summer sweat drip from my own nose, her turn to shiver beneath a blanket, crooked ruts in the sand stretching behind us toward the boardwalk. –Hugh Howey, The Shell Collector

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story involving beach memories.

Journaling Prompt: What do you think about when you picture a beach?

Art Prompt: Beach

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how places become associated with pivotal times in our lives.

Photo Credit: Michael L. on Flickr

The captain remembered that even when he was a small boy — before he went to sea at age thirteen — he had carried his deep mood of melancholy within him like a cold secret. This melancholic nature had manifested itself in his pleasure at standing outside the village on a winter night watching the lamp lights fade, by finding small places in which to hide — claustrophobia had never been a problem for Francis Crozier — and by being so afraid of the dark, seeing it as the avatar of the death that had claimed his mother and grandmother in such a stealthy way, that he had perversely sought it out, hiding in the root cellar while other boys played in the sunlight. Crozier remembered that cellar — the grave chill of it, the smell of cold and mold, the darkness and inward-pressing which left one alone with dark thoughts. –The Terror by Dan Simmons

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story from the point of view of someone with melancholy.

Journaling Prompt: What is your general mood? Do you ever hide your true mood from people?

Art Prompt: Melancholy

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about mood disorders.

Photo Credit: Neil Moralee on Flickr

Stuttering, also known as stammering, is a speech disorder in which the flow of speech is disrupted by involuntary repetitions and prolongations of sounds, syllables, words or phrases as well as involuntary silent pauses or blocks in which the person who stutters is unable to produce sounds. The term stuttering is most commonly associated with involuntary sound repetition, but it also encompasses the abnormal hesitation or pausing before speech, referred to by people who stutter as blocks, and the prolongation of certain sounds, usually vowels or semivowels. According to Watkins et al., stuttering is a disorder of “selection, initiation, and execution of motor sequences necessary for fluent speech production.” For many people who stutter, repetition is the primary problem. The term “stuttering” covers a wide range of severity, encompassing barely perceptible impediments that are largely cosmetic to severe symptoms that effectively prevent oral communication. In the world, approximately four times as many men as women stutter, encompassing 70 million people worldwide, or about 1% of the world’s population.

The impact of stuttering on a person’s functioning and emotional state can be severe. This may include fears of having to enunciate specific vowels or consonants, fears of being caught stuttering in social situations, self-imposed isolation, anxiety, stress, shame, being a possible target of bullying (especially in children), having to use word substitution and rearrange words in a sentence to hide stuttering, or a feeling of “loss of control” during speech. Stuttering is sometimes popularly seen as a symptom of anxiety, but there is actually no direct correlation in that direction (though as mentioned the inverse can be true, as social anxiety may actually develop in individuals as a result of their stuttering) –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Give one of your characters a problem with speaking, even if it’s only temporary. Create conflict from this.

Journaling Prompt: Write about how you feel when you are trying to have a conversation with someone with a speech impediment. How do you handle it?

Art Prompt: Stutter

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the problems that someone who stutters face in work and relationships. Give tips for how to hold a conversation with someone who stutters.

Photo Credit: Evan on Flickr

…researchers assessed each individual’s homelessness, inpatient mental-health treatment, psychological symptoms of mental illness, substance use and as victims or perpetrators of violence. The researchers evaluated all of these items as both indicators and outcomes — i.e., as both causes and effects.

“We found that all of these indicators mattered, but often in different ways,” says Sarah Desmarais, an associate professor of psychology at NC State and co-author of the paper. “For example, drug use was a leading indicator of committing violence, while alcohol use was a leading indicator of being a victim of violence.”

However, the researchers also found that one particular category of psychological symptoms was also closely associated with violence: affective symptoms.

“By affect, we mean symptoms including anxiety, depressive symptoms and poor impulse control,” Desmarais says. “The more pronounced affective symptoms were, the more likely someone was to both commit violence and be a victim of violence…

…on average, the researchers found that one event in which a person was a victim of violence triggered seven other effects, such as psychological symptoms, homelessness and becoming perpetrators of violence. Those seven effects, on average, triggered an additional 39 additional effects.

“It’s a complex series of interactions that spirals over time, exacerbating substance use, mental-health problems and violent behavior,” Van Dorn says. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a protagonist with poor impulse control and high anxiety.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the state of your mental health and how it affects your behavior.

Art Prompt: Mental Illness and Violence

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell  your audience about the complicated relationship between mental illness and violence.

Photo Credit: Alvaro Tapia on Flickr

She was beautiful when she was angry, and she was more than beautiful today. –Celtic Skies by Delaney Rhodes

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about someone who is in love with an angry woman.

Journaling Prompt: How do you act when you get angry.

Art Prompt: My anger

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a story about a time when you got angry and what you learned from that experience.

Photo Credit: Matthew Kenwrick on Flickr

He gathered her unbound hair and started working through it with the comb from the top of her head down to its ends, which brushed the floor. It was impossible to concentrate on anything except the warmth of his breath on her neck, the way his fingers brushed against her back, or her arms, or the lobe of her ear. This state of suspension, him brushing and her sitting so still lest she utter his name or throw herself into his arms, was almost painful, and yet she dared not move for fear of breaking the connection. Anji was a patient man, very disciplined, and she began to wonder if he meant to comb her hair all night just to see who would break first. And because she was so very tired, and wrung tight, and aching with misery and hope, she began to laugh, a little hysterically perhaps, but laughter all the same even if there were sobs caught in it. He set the comb on the tray. “Enough, Mai,” he said, his voice husky with desire, perhaps with satisfaction, perhaps with anger still simmering. He embraced her, pulling her close. “Enough.” –Kate Elliott, Traitors’ Gate

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene or poem about a couple who has had a fight and how they make up.

Journaling Prompt: How do you make a conciliatory gesture after a fight?

Art Prompt: Making up

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about a fight you had with someone important to you.

Photo Credit: Pray for Peaceful Dream on Flickr

An old therapeutic axiom in Gestalt psychology, which also lies at the very heart of shamanism and contemplative mysticism worldwide, suggests that the healing of a wound must come from the blood of the wound itself. In other words, the healing of an emotional or psychospiritual wound is brought about precisely by entering into its terrain, not by avoiding it. –The Mist-Filled Path: Celtic Wisdom for Exiles, Wanderers, and Seekers by Frank MacEowen

Fiction Writing Prompt: What is your protagonist’s wound, and what will he or she have to do to enter it and heal it?

Journaling Prompt: Write about an emotional wound that you need to heal. What will you have to do to get the courage to enter into that healing?

Art Prompt: Entering the wound

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about shamanism or comtemplative mysticism and give them one thing that they can learn from those traditions.

Photo Credit: Janice L. on Flickr

fragileheart

…destiny permits no one to continue in blissful happiness. Fate could not tolerate it. Something trivial, a glance, a word, a touch, could shatter a friendship. A love deemed deep and lasting was so fragile it could disappear like straw in the wind. –The Contessa’s Vendetta: A Novel of Betrayal and Revenge by Mirella Sichirollo Patzer

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or poem inspired by a twist of fate.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when your happiness was shattered suddenly.

Art Prompt: Fragile fate

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story about a twist of fate.

Photo Credit: masaru minoya on Flickr

bear

Be scared. You can’t help that. But don’t be afraid. Ain’t nothing in the woods going to hurt you unless you corner it, or it smells that you are afraid. A bear or a deer, too, has got to be scared of a coward the same as a brave man has got to be. –The Bear by William Faulkner

Fiction Writing Prompt: How does your protagonist react when he or she is afraid? Add to your character sketch.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react when you are scared?

Art Prompt: Don’t be afraid

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous or dramatic story about a scary incident in your life.

Photo Credit: Harald Deischinger on Flickr

mon-infidelity

Infidelity can lead to relationship dissatisfaction and breakdown, though in some cases the problems may be caused by the different ways in which individuals define infidelity. The authors, based in the USA, sought to better understand potential perceptions of infidelity. They found that “women were more likely than men to identify both sexual-based and emotion-based acts as constituting infidelity.”…

The authors suggest that their finding that women were more likely to identify certain acts as infidelity is unsurprising given that the women scored higher than the men on measures of ‘communion’ — “the extent to which a person wants to form and maintain positive interpersonal bonds.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where the conflict derives from a difference in opinion on what constitutes infidelity.

Journaling Prompt: How do you define infidelity? What are your expectations for your partner’s behavior?

Art Prompt: Infidelity

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the difference between how men and women perceive infidelity.

Photo Credit: cometstarmoon on Flickr