Currently viewing the tag: "escape"

After the outbreak of World War II, the castle was converted into a high security prisoner-of-war camp for officers who had become security or escape risks or who were regarded as particularly dangerous. Since the castle is situated on a rocky outcrop above the River Mulde, the Germans believed it to be an ideal site for a high security prison.

The larger outer court, known as the Kommandantur, had only two exits and housed a large German garrison. The prisoners lived in an adjacent courtyard in a 90 ft (27 m) tall building. Outside, the flat terraces which surrounded the prisoners’ accommodation were constantly watched by armed sentries and surrounded by barbed wire. Although known as Colditz Castle to the locals, its official German designation was Oflag IV-C and it was under Wehrmacht control.

Although it was considered a high security prison, it had one of the highest records of successful escape attempts. This could be owing to the general nature of the prisoners that were sent there; most of them had attempted escape previously from other prisons and were transferred to Colditz, because the Germans had thought the castle escape-proof.

One lavish scheme even included a glider, the “Colditz Cock”, that was kept in a remote portion of the castle’s attic, completed in the winter of 1944–45, but following the Great Escape, in which 50 escapees were executed, all further escape attempts were officially discouraged and the glider was never used. When the camp was liberated by the Americans in late April, 1945 the glider was brought down from the hidden workshop to the attic below and assembled for the prisoners to see. It was at this time that the only known photograph of the glider was taken. For some time after the war the glider was regarded as either a myth or tall story, as there was no solid proof that the glider had existed and Colditz was then in the Soviet Occupation Zone. Bill Goldfinch, however, took home the drawings he had made when designing the glider and, when the single photograph finally surfaced, the story was taken seriously. –Colditz Castle on Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write an escape story set in a POW camp in a castle.

Journaling Prompt: What historic place from WWII would you like to visit and why?

Art Prompt: Escape

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about Colditz Castle.

Photo Credit: Colditz on Wikimedia

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The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses used by 19th-century enslaved people of African descent in the United States in efforts to escape to free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause. The term is also applied to the abolitionists, both black and white, free and enslaved, who aided the fugitives. Various other routes led to Mexico or overseas. An earlier escape route running south toward Florida, then a Spanish possession, existed from the late 17th century until shortly after the American Revolution. However, the network now generally known as the Underground Railroad was formed in the early 19th century, and reached its height between 1850 and 1860. One estimate suggests that by 1850, 100,000 slaves had escaped via the “Railroad”. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of someone using a secret escape route and the perils he or she encounters.

Journaling Prompt: If you were living in the time of the Underground Railroad, would you help the fleeing slaves? Why or why not?

Art Prompt: Underground Railroad

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the Underground Railroad.

Photo Credit: Kyle J. Schultz on Flickr

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Come, faeries, take me out of this dull house!
Let me have all the freedom I have lost;
Work when I will and idle when I will!
Faeries, come take me out of this dull world,
For I would ride with you upon the wind,
Run on the top of the dishevelled tide,
And dance upon the mountains like a flame.
-William Butler Yeats, The Land of Heart’s Desire

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write about a character who wants to leave their humdrum life to dance with the faeries.

Journaling Prompt: Have you ever wished that you could run away from it all. Write a fantasy about doing that.

Art Prompt: Faerie Dance

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about ways people can escape from their everyday life in just a few minutes a day.

Photo Credit: The artist (formerly) known as Gene on Flickr