Currently viewing the tag: "fear"

The structural engineers on the [World Trade Center] project also considered the possibility that an aircraft could crash into the building. In July 1945, a B-25 bomber that was lost in the fog had crashed into the 78th and 79th floors of the Empire State Building. A year later, another airplane crashed into the 40 Wall Street building, and there was another close call at the Empire State Building. In designing the World Trade Center, Leslie Robertson considered the scenario of the impact of a jet airliner, the Boeing 707, which might be lost in the fog, seeking to land at JFK or at Newark airports. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) found a three-page white paper that mentioned another aircraft impact analysis, involving impact of a jet at 600 mph (970 km/h), was indeed considered, but NIST could not locate the documentary evidence of the aircraft impact analysis. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of engineers who foresee a potential terrorist attack.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the feelings that you experience when you hear about a terrorist attack.

Art Prompt: Terror

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the building of the World Trade Center.

Photo Credit: Remains of WTC2 facade after 9-11 on Wikimedia

I can guarantee you one thing: I know for a fact that the black suits have spies inside every government agency out there.”
Helen raised an eyebrow. “The government is spying on itself?”
“Why wouldn’t it?” Chip asked, as if to say, “Silly question.” –Ernie Lindsey, Skynoise

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about agencies within the government spying on each other.

Journaling Prompt: What is your level of trust with the government of your country? 

Art Prompt: Spies

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the problem of secrecy within governments and the problems it causes.

Photo Credit: xxx on Flickr

Porphyria has been suggested as an explanation for the origin of vampire and werewolf legends, based upon certain perceived similarities between the condition and the folklore.

In January 1964, L. Illis’s 1963 paper, “On Porphyria and the Aetiology of Werwolves,” was published in Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine. Later, Nancy Garden argued for a connection between porphyria and the vampire belief in her 1973 book, Vampires. In 1985, biochemist David Dolphin’s paper for the American Association for the Advancement of Science, “Porphyria, Vampires, and Werewolves: The Aetiology of European Metamorphosis Legends,” gained widespread media coverage, popularizing the idea.

The theory has been rejected by a few folklorists and researchers as not accurately describing the characteristics of the original werewolf and vampire legends or the disease, and as potentially stigmatizing sufferers of porphyria.

A 1995 article from the Postgraduate Medical Journal (via NIH) explains:
As it was believed that the folkloric vampire could move about freely in daylight hours, as opposed to the 20th century variant, congenital erythropoietic porphyria cannot readily explain the folkloric vampire but may be an explanation of the vampire as we know it in the 20th century. In addition, the folkloric vampire, when unearthed, was always described as looking quite healthy (“as they were in life”), while due to disfiguring aspects of the disease, sufferers would not have passed the exhumation test. Individuals with congenital erythropoietic porphyria do not crave blood. The enzyme (hematin) necessary to alleviate symptoms is not absorbed intact on oral ingestion, and drinking blood would have no beneficial effect on the sufferer. Finally, and most important, the fact that vampire reports were literally rampant in the 18th century, and that congenital erythropoietic porphyria is an extremely rare manifestation of a rare disease, makes it an unlikely explanation of the folkloric vampire. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about someone with a medical condition who is shunned because the condition is misunderstood.

Journaling Prompt: What medical condition are you afraid of? How does that cause you to act around people with the condition?

Art Prompt: Vampires

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of medical investigation.

Photo Credit: Edvard Munch – Vampire (1895) on Wikimedia

daymare
a distressing experience, similar to a bad dream, occurring while one is awake.
an acute anxiety attack.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Do you take naps? If so, do you ever dream during your naps?

Art Prompt: Daymare

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Wolfie Rankin on Flickr

The Manhattan Project was a research and development undertaking during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons. It was led by the United States with the support of the United Kingdom and Canada. From 1942 to 1946, the project was under the direction of Major General Leslie Groves of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Nuclear physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer was the director of the Los Alamos Laboratory that designed the actual bombs. The Army component of the project was designated the Manhattan District; “Manhattan” gradually superseded the official codename, Development of Substitute Materials, for the entire project. Along the way, the project absorbed its earlier British counterpart, Tube Alloys. The Manhattan Project began modestly in 1939, but grew to employ more than 130,000 people and cost nearly US $2 billion (about $27 billion in 2016[1] dollars). Over 90% of the cost was for building factories and to produce fissile material, with less than 10% for development and production of the weapons. Research and production took place at more than 30 sites across the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or poem about the secret development of a new weapon.

Journaling Prompt: Write about how you feel that we have the ability to destroy ourselves and the planet.

Art Prompt: Manhattan Project

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the Manhattan Project.

Photo Credit: Trinity shot on Wikimedia

I’m not scared of the woods. I’m scared of being lost in the woods, unable to find my way back to the main road and the brush where I hid the bike. Mostly, I’m scared about what else might be in the woods hunting the deer hunters. –The Omega Project by Steve Alten

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a horror story about something that hunts the hunters in the woods.

Journaling Prompt: What scares you about being in a wilderness area.

Art Prompt: Hunted

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about common fears about going out into the wilderness and what they can do to stay safe.

Photo Credit: Nick Vidal-Hall on Flickr

Spring-heeled Jack is an entity in English folklore of the Victorian era. The first claimed sighting of Spring-heeled Jack was in 1837. Later sightings were reported all over Great Britain and were especially prevalent in suburban London, the Midlands and Scotland.

There are many theories about the nature and identity of Spring-heeled Jack. This urban legend was very popular in its time, due to the tales of his bizarre appearance and ability to make extraordinary leaps, to the point that he became the topic of several works of fiction.

Spring-heeled Jack was described by people who claimed to have seen him as having a terrifying and frightful appearance, with diabolical physiognomy, clawed hands, and eyes that “resembled red balls of fire”. One report claimed that, beneath a black cloak, he wore a helmet and a tight-fitting white garment like an oilskin. Many stories also mention a “Devil-like” aspect. Others said he was tall and thin, with the appearance of a gentleman. Several reports mention that he could breathe out blue and white flames and that he wore sharp metallic claws at his fingertips. At least two people claimed that he was able to speak comprehensible English. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Create a character that terrorizes a whole city.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a character from a folk tale that scared you as a kid.

Art Prompt: Spring Heeled Jack

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the legend of Spring Heeled Jack or another frightening character from a folk tale.

Stuttering, also known as stammering, is a speech disorder in which the flow of speech is disrupted by involuntary repetitions and prolongations of sounds, syllables, words or phrases as well as involuntary silent pauses or blocks in which the person who stutters is unable to produce sounds. The term stuttering is most commonly associated with involuntary sound repetition, but it also encompasses the abnormal hesitation or pausing before speech, referred to by people who stutter as blocks, and the prolongation of certain sounds, usually vowels or semivowels. According to Watkins et al., stuttering is a disorder of “selection, initiation, and execution of motor sequences necessary for fluent speech production.” For many people who stutter, repetition is the primary problem. The term “stuttering” covers a wide range of severity, encompassing barely perceptible impediments that are largely cosmetic to severe symptoms that effectively prevent oral communication. In the world, approximately four times as many men as women stutter, encompassing 70 million people worldwide, or about 1% of the world’s population.

The impact of stuttering on a person’s functioning and emotional state can be severe. This may include fears of having to enunciate specific vowels or consonants, fears of being caught stuttering in social situations, self-imposed isolation, anxiety, stress, shame, being a possible target of bullying (especially in children), having to use word substitution and rearrange words in a sentence to hide stuttering, or a feeling of “loss of control” during speech. Stuttering is sometimes popularly seen as a symptom of anxiety, but there is actually no direct correlation in that direction (though as mentioned the inverse can be true, as social anxiety may actually develop in individuals as a result of their stuttering) –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Give one of your characters a problem with speaking, even if it’s only temporary. Create conflict from this.

Journaling Prompt: Write about how you feel when you are trying to have a conversation with someone with a speech impediment. How do you handle it?

Art Prompt: Stutter

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the problems that someone who stutters face in work and relationships. Give tips for how to hold a conversation with someone who stutters.

Photo Credit: Evan on Flickr

vitriolic adj
  • (chemistry) Of or pertaining to vitriol; derived from or resembling vitriol; vitriolous.
  • (figuratively) Bitterly scathing, caustic.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about someone who is vitriolic and how they make you feel

Art Prompt: Vitriolic

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Steve Rhodes on Flickr

“Don’t panic.”
“I’m not panicking, I’m watching you panic. It’s more entertaining.”

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene where two people are trying not to panic.

Journaling Prompt: Write about what makes you panic and what you do when you’re panicked.

Art Prompt: Don’t panic!

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about a time that made you panic.

Photo Credit: Barry Mulling on Flickr