Currently viewing the tag: "food"

Medieval cuisine includes foods, eating habits, and cooking methods of various European cultures during the Middle Ages, which lasted from the fifth to the fifteenth century. During this period, diets and cooking changed less than they did in early modern period that followed, when those changes helped lay the foundations for modern European cuisine. Cereals remained the most important staple during the early Middle Ages as rice was introduced late, and the potato was only introduced in 1536, with a much later date for widespread consumption. Barley, oat and rye were among the poor. Wheat was for the governing classes. Those were consumed as bread, porridge, gruel and pasta by all of society’s members. Fava beans and vegetables were important supplements to the cereal-based diet of the lower orders. (Phaseolus beans, today the “common bean”, were of New World origin and were introduced after the Columbian Exchange in the 16th century.)

Meat was more expensive and therefore more prestigious. Game, a form of meat acquired from hunting, was common only on the nobility’s tables. The most prevalent butcher’s meats were pork, chicken and other domestic fowl; beef, which required greater investment in land, was less common. Cod and herring were mainstays among the northern populations; dried, smoked or salted they made their way far inland, but a wide variety of other saltwater and freshwater fish was also eaten.

Slow transportation and food preservation techniques (based on drying, salting, smoking and pickling) made long-distance trade of many foods very expensive. Because of this, the nobility food was more prone to foreign influence than the cuisine of the poor; it was dependent on exotic spices and expensive imports. As each level of society imitated the one above it, innovations from international trade and foreign wars from the 12th century onwards gradually disseminated through the upper middle class of medieval cities. Aside from economic unavailability of luxuries such as spices, decrees outlawed consumption of certain foods among certain social classes and sumptuary laws limited conspicuous consumption among the nouveaux riches. Social norms also dictated that the food of the working class be less refined, since it was believed there was a natural resemblance between one’s labour and one’s food; manual labour required coarser, cheaper food. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write about the cuisine in your world and how it differs between different social and cultural groups. 

Journaling Prompt: Write about your family of origin’s cuisine.

Art Prompt: Medieval cuisine

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about medieval culture.

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Jeremy Brooks on Flickr

gourmand
  • One who eats to excess.
  • A lover of good food.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your relationship with food.

Art Prompt: Gourmand

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Peter Forret on Flickr

I made soup tonight
and all my ancestors danced
in the pot, with the barley
the beans, the knuckle and neck bones,
enriching this brew;
Here women joined
love and ancient wisdom, the knowledge
salt and pepper bring; Secrets
that are ritual and legacy.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story that involves food and magic.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about cooking? 

Art Prompt: Cooking magic

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the magic of cooking your own food.

Photo Credit: wuchale59 on Flickr

When I was twelve years old I accidentally substituted salt for sugar in a cake recipe. –Twelve Sharp by Janet Evanovich

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the craziest kitchen accident you’ve ever had.

Art Prompt: Kitchen mishap

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about a mistake in the kitchen.

Photo Credit: Dark Dwarf on Flickr

tiffin n
  • (Britain, India) A light midday meal or snack; luncheon.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: What is your favorite tiffin?

Art Prompt: Tiffin

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Bunches and Bits {Karina} on Flickr

Soldiers_from_the_78th_Division_enjoying_tea_and_cakes_served_by_a_Salvation_Army_van_in_the_forward_area,_Italy,_28_November_1943._NA9413

war cake noun
A kind of cake made from the limited ingredients available in wartime.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about how you feel when you have to give something up.

Art Prompt: War cakes

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Girls at clam bake presided over by Alfred Keith, Little Sandy Pond, Bryantville section of Pembroke

A clam-bake is a delight wherever and whenever partaken of, but when it is prepared in the piney woods of Cape Cod by the inimitable skippers of Buzzards Bay it is something that is not to be forgotten. It is a joy, from the gathering of the first stone to the swallowing of the last possible clam. –Suppers: Novel Suggestions for Social Occasions by Paul Pierce

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set at a clam bake.

Journaling Prompt: Reminisce about your favorite outdoor meal.

Art Prompt: Clam Bake

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience an amusing story about an outdoor meal you shared with family and/or friends.

Photo Credit: Boston Public Library on Flickr