Currently viewing the tag: "gambling"


Babette’s or Babette’s Supper Club was a supper club and bar at 2211 Pacific Avenue on the Boardwalk of Atlantic City, New Jersey. It operated from the early 1920s onwards and was sold in 1950. The bar was designed like a ship’s bow. In the backroom was a gambling den, which was investigated by the federal authorities and raided in 1943…

Though considered one of the city’s most upmarket clubs, Babette’s gained a reputation for hosting illegal gambling, prompting a federal investigation in the 1930s. There was a backroom at Babette’s containing card tables and horse-race betting, which was illegal at the time. The gambling den attracted the high rollers of the period; Astors, Vanderbilts and others from New York’s social register could be found in the rooms at Babette’s. Stebbins was able to protect his casino business by his connections with politicians and those in the legal profession. His niece Gloria Vallee recalled in 1980 that the venue was continually being raided by police, but they would tip her uncle off that there would be a raid, so he could protect his clients. The mode of escaping the police was to exit through a trap door in the horse betting room. This led to a staircase to the roof. The gamblers crossed the roof and came down another flight of stairs on the side of the building which led into the Stebbins’ home. In 1943, Babette’s was raided by the authorities and booking equipment was confiscated. Stebbins was fined several thousand dollars for facilitating illegal gambling. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set in a back room gambling parlor.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about gambling for money?

Art Prompt: Gambling

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of Babette’s Supper Club.

Photo Credit: Viri G on Flickr

Roulette wheel

The Gambler’s Fallacy is the idea that past behavior influences future behavior. In everyday life, it’s a good strategy — there are all kinds of ways that events in the past affect events in the future. When gamblers take that idea into a casino, things get very bad, very quickly. At least, things get bad for the people; the casino can wring some profit out of that cognitive bias, and it did at the Monte Carlo Casino on August 18th, 1913. It was an ordinary night, until someone noticed that the roulette ball had fallen on black for quite some time. When it just kept falling, people got interested. Then they started pushing money onto the table. The thought process was that the ball had fallen on black so many times that it had to fall on red sometime soon. –Esther Inglis-Arkel

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which the gambler’s fallacy complicates your protagonist’s life.

Journaling Prompt: What is the biggest gamble you’ve ever taken?

Art Prompt: The Gambler’s Fallacy

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Inform your audience about the gambler’s fallacy and how they can avoid it when taking a risk of any kind.

Photo Credit: Håkan Dahlström on Flickr

Bored at work

Although boredom is often seen as a trivial and temporary discomfort that can be alleviated by a simple change in circumstances, it can also be a chronic and pervasive stressor that can have significant consequences for health and well-being.
Boredom at work may cause serious accidents when safety depends on continuous vigilance, as in medical monitoring or long-haul truck driving. On a behavioral level, boredom has been linked with problems with impulse control, leading to overeating and binge eating, drug and alcohol abuse, and problem gambling. Boredom has even been associated with mortality, lending grim weight to the popular phrase “bored to death.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Create character for your story who is bored. What are the consequences of that boredom?

Journaling Prompt: When do you get bored and how do you cope with it?

Art Prompt: Boredom at work

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Inform your audience about the problems of boredom and provide tips for dealing with it.

Photo Credit: hawk684 on Flickr


It is intuitive that most people would be less likely to take risks after an unexpected loss. What happens after a surprising win?

It turns out that the very same trend applies, according to Case Western Reserve University psychologist Heath Demaree. In other words, it’s not whether you win or lose, but whether the outcome is expected. People appear to decrease their risk-taking levels after experiencing any surprising outcome – even positive ones. –Case Western Reserve University press release

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about someone who wins and then becomes afraid to take any more risks.

Journaling Prompt: Does winning make you more or less cautious?

Art Prompt: Surprise Victory

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about the relationship of risk to success. Convince your audience that they need to continue taking risks even after experiencing success.

Photo Credit: Daadi on Flickr


“For a long time we’ve asked ourselves, ‘How come smart, rational people carry out short-term schemes that in the long-term undoubtedly are going to sink them?'” says author Ramy Elitzur, who holds the Edward J. Kernaghan Professorship in Financial Analysis and is an associate professor of accounting.

“The answer is — we’re not rational. We’re rational only in a limited sense.”

The study bases its findings on a model of the manager-owner relationship over time. The model is also noteworthy for combining principles of game theory — used to predict strategic behaviour — with the idea of bounded rationality — that our decisions are always made within the limits of available time, information, and the human capacity to analyze it. –Science Daily

Writing Prompt: Write a story or scene about someone who carries out a scheme doomed to fail.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when you misjudged a situation.

Art Prompt: Scheming

Nonfiction / Speech Writing Prompt: Write about a scheme that suckered in a lot of people and what we can learn by studying it.

Photo Credit: Big C Harvey on Flickr


“Go big or go home.” “No risk, no gain.” Google quotations about the benefits of taking risks and you’ll find a boatload. But what’s the downside?

…overconfidence frequently brings rewards, as long as spoils of conflict are sufficiently large compared with the costs of competing for them. In contrast, people with unbiased, accurate perceptions usually fare worse.

The implications are that, over a long period of time the evolutionary principal of natural selection is likely to have favored a bias towards overconfidence. Therefore people with the mentality of someone like boxer Mohammad Ali would have left more descendents than those with the mindset of film maker Woody Allen.
The evolutionary model also showed that overconfidence becomes greatest in the face of high levels of uncertainty and risk. When we face unfamiliar enemies or new technologies, overconfidence becomes an even better strategy.

Dr Dominic Johnson, reader in Politics and International Relations at the University: ‘The model shows that overconfidence can plausibly evolve in wide range of environments, as well as the situations in which it will fail. The question now is how to channel human overconfidence so we can exploit its benefits while avoiding occasional disasters.’ –Science Daily

Writing Prompt: Write a scene where the character takes a big risk with two different outcomes – one where the risk pays off and one where the risk leads to massive failure.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when you took a big risk.

Art Prompt: Overconfidence

Nonfiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story of how overconfidence got you into trouble.

Photo Credit: John C Bullas BSc MSc PhD MCIHT MIAT on Flickr

cliff diving

Are your friends a bad influence on you? 

The rewards outweigh the risks — when you’re in a group, anyway. A new USC study explains why people take stupid chances when all of their friends are watching that they would never take by themselves. According to the study, the human brain places more value on winning in a social setting than it does on winning when you’re alone.

“These findings suggest that the brain is equipped with the ability to detect and encode social signals, make social signals salient, and then, use these signals to optimize future behavior,” Coricelli said.
As Coricelli explained, in private environments, losing can more easily be life-threatening. With no social support network in place, a bad gamble can spell doom.

In group environments, on the other hand, rewards tend to be winner-takes-all. Nowhere is this more clear than in sexual competition, where — to borrow a phrase from racing legend Dale Earnhardt, Sr. — second place is just first loser.

“Among animals, there are strong incentives for wanting to be at the top of the social ranking,” Coricelli said. “Animals in the dominant position use their status to secure privileged access to resources, such as food and mates.” –Science Daily

Writing Prompt: Write a scene that demonstrates the subtle peer pressure of making decisions in a group.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time that you made a risky decision that was influenced by the presence of a group of friends.

Art Prompt: Risky decisions

Nonfiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a story about a time when you made a risky decision.

Photo Credit: Dana on Flickr

woman looks at sky

The pros and cons of narcissism is fascinating as we watch our culture gets more and more narcissistic. I’ve included just a snippet of the information. If you are writing characters, you’ll want to read the entire article and follow the links in it for more information.

For years, psychologists have observed that people routinely overestimate their abilities, said study leader Dominic Johnson, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Some experts have suggested that overconfidence can be a good thing, perhaps by boosting ambition, resolve, and other traits, creating self-fulfilling prophecies.

But positive self-delusion can also lead to faulty assessments, unrealistic expectations, and hazardous decisions, according to the study—making it a mystery why overconfidence remains a key human trait despite thousands of years of natural selection, which typically weeds out harmful traits over generations.

Now, new computer simulations show that a false sense of optimism, whether when deciding to go to war or investing in a new stock, can often improve your chances of winning. -Christine Dell’Amore, National Geographic News

Writing Prompt: What is your character overconfident about? How does that benefit her? How does that cause her to make risky decisions?

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when you were overconfident and how that affected your decision-making.

Art Prompt: Overconfidence

Nonfiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the benefits of overconfidence

Photo Credit: Mustafa Khayat on Flickr


Magical thinking is something we associate with children, but adults engage in a lot of magical thinking as well. The difference is that they aren’t aware of it and if asked, will generally deny it.

The experimental findings, in the paper “Washing Away Your (Good or Bad) Luck: Physical Cleansing Affects Risk-Taking Behavior,” converge with anecdotal reports of superstitious practices, such as an athlete wearing the same unwashed shirt during a winning streak, and show that magical beliefs about luck have behavioral consequences.

Magical beliefs are exhibited, for example, by having confidence in one’s ability to predict the outcome of a random event beyond the known probabilities if one can exert irrelevant control on the situation. For example, research has shown people are more confident they will have a winning scratch-off lottery ticket if they pick the ticket instead of being given one by a clerk.

Debriefing conversations with participants suggest that people remain unaware of these influences, as has also been observed in other studies. Although participants are familiar with the underlying metaphors and related superstitious practices, they do not realize that this knowledge is applicable to the experiment and, needless to say, insist that they would never be influenced by such a thing. –Science Daily

Writing Prompt: Write a scene in which your character engages in some unconscious superstitious behavior.

Journaling Prompt: Do you use any superstitious rituals to create a feeling of control in your life?

Art Prompt: Lucky rituals
Nonfiction / SpeechwritingPrompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about a ritual you have used in the past.

Photo Credit: dollen on Flickr

fingers crossed

I’ve never had a lucky charm, but one of my friends in grade school had a hot pink rabbit’s foot. I thought it was gross, but she believed it brought her luck. I wonder whether she gambles and if so, is she still carrying that horrible thing.

Studying compulsive gamblers who were seeking treatment at the National Problem Gambling Clinic, the researchers found that those gamblers with higher levels of impulsivity were much more susceptible to errors in reasoning associated with gambling, such as superstitious rituals (e.g. carrying a lucky charm) and explaining away recent losses (e.g. on bad luck or ‘cold’ machines). –Science Daily

Writing Prompt: Create a superstition for one of your characters that affects how he or she acts in certain specific situations.

Journaling Prompt: Have you ever had a lucky charm or ritual?

Art Prompt: Lucky Charm

Nonfiction / Speech Writing Prompt: Write a story about your lucky charm.

Photo Credit: Artotem on Flickr