Currently viewing the tag: "ghosts"


Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: If you’ve had an experience with a haunting, write about it. If not, do you believe houses can be haunted? Why or why not?

Art Prompt: Of course the house is haunted.

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic or humorous story about a haunted house.

Photo Credit: ihave3kids on Flickr

henry_triggs_coffin

Trigg was a prosperous grocer with a twin-gabled shop in Middle Row, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, as well as a number of other properties. He was a church warden, an overseer of the parish, and an important man locally. It is said that one night, he and two friends witnessed grave robbers at a local graveyard, and they vowed to make sure that this would not happen to them. Trigg stated in his will that his body should be committed for a minimum of 30 years to “the West end of my Hovel to be decently laid there upon a floor erected by my Executor, upon the purlin for the same purpose, nothing doubting but that at the general Resurrection, I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God.” According to Gentleman’s Magazine of 5 Feb 1751, Trigg’s will stated that he supposed that he would return to life after 30 years and then his estate would revert to him, and that he ordered that the barn be locked with the key inside his coffin so that he could let himself out. Shortly before he died, Trigg had negotiated with the parish authorities to rent his barn as the town’s workhouse…

Trigg died in Letchworth, Hertfordshire on 6 October 1724 before renovations could be carried out on his barn… Therefore, his remains were placed in a lead-lined coffin of oak and pine and hoisted into the rafters of the barn behind the shop, about 10 feet (3.0 m) above the ground.
Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of an unusual will provision.

Journaling Prompt: What do you want done with your body after you die?

Art Prompt: Grave robbers

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the strange story of Henry Trigg’s coffin.

Photo Credit: Henry Trigg’s coffin on Wikimedia

thursday regrets

There are no ghosts. There is no such thing, little Poppy. No ghosts — only our regrets. –Water Ghosts by Shawna Yang Ryan

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story, poem, or haiku about the regrets that haunt your protagonist.

Journaling Prompt: What do you regret right now? How are you handling it?

Art Prompt: The ghosts of regrets

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story about something you regretted and use the story to teach them how to handle regrets in a healthy way.

Photo Credit: Neil Moralee on Flickr

Thursday Poltergeist

Poltergeist is the term assigned to those apparently meaningless noises and movements of objects of which we from time to time hear accounts. The word is, of course, German, and may be translated “boisterous ghost.” …

Professor Barrett, in the paper to which we have already referred, draws certain conclusions from his study of this subject; one of the chief of these is that “the widespread belief in fairies, pixies, gnomes, brownies, etc., probably rests on the varied manifestations of poltergeists.” –St. John D. (St. John Drelincourt) Seymour, True Irish Ghost Stories

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story involving a poltergeist.
Journaling Prompt: Do you believe in poltergeist or other supernatural events?

Art Prompt: Poltergeist

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a dramatic story about a poltergeist.

sat ghosts

Behind every man now alive stand thirty ghosts, for that is the ratio by which the dead outnumber the living. –2001 – A Space Odyssey, Arthur C. Clarke

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Do you believe in ghosts? Have you had any experiences with them?

Art Prompt: Ghosts

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about an experience you had that cannot be explained logically.

Photo Credit: M. Accarino on Flickr

Amityville Horror

…the Amityville murder house is probably one of the most famous houses in America. The story about what happened there, as told in the horror book and movie, is a hoax. It’s not true. But there was a mass murder there that took place in the house prior to that. I think what inspired the Lutz family to write their book was that they got freaked out while living there, and they had to have an excuse as to why they skedaddled in the middle of the night. I think a lot of people have that internal debate: “Could I live there? Would it freak me out? What if I lived next door?” –Cheryl Eddy

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a family that moves into a house where a terrible murder has taken place. 

Journaling Prompt: How would you feel if you found out you were living in a place where something awful happened? How would you deal with it?

Art Prompt: Haunted house

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a scary story about a haunted house.

Photo Credit: Edward Simpson on Flickr

ancestralspirit

Ancestral spirits, it seems, were once believed to be immanent in the fire that burned on the hearth, and had to be propitiated with libations, while elsewhere the souls of the dead were thought to return to their old homes at the New Year, and meat and drink had to be set out for them. The Church’s establishment of All Souls’ Day did much to keep practices of tendance of the departed to early November, but sometimes these have wandered to later dates and especially to Christmas. In folk-practices directed towards the dead two tendencies are to be found: on the one hand affection or at all events consideration for the departed persists, and efforts are made to make them comfortable; on the other, they are regarded with dread, and the sight of them is avoided by the living. –Christmas in Ritual and Tradition, Christian and Pagan by Clement A. Miles

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where the conflict is created by an ancestral spirit.

Journaling Prompt: What do you believe about what happens after we die?

Art Prompt: Ancestral spirits

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about various cultural beliefs about ancestral spirits and how these beliefs shape the culture.

 

In 1873, a man was convicted of murdering his wife based on the testimony of a ghost. Erasmus Shue, a West Virginian blacksmith, claimed to have discovered his wife dead at the foot of their staircase. By the time authorities arrived, he had dressed the corpse in a high-necked dress. He then cradled her head so tightly the coroner could only examine the limbs. After the funeral, during which Shue acted erratically and insisted on wrapping a scarf around the corpse’s neck, Shue’s mother-in-law claimed she was visited by the ghost of her daughter. The ghost said Shue had beaten her regularly and strangled her in a fit of rage over not making meat for dinner. The mother-in-law badgered the authorities until they agreed to exhume the body. Sure enough, there were thumb bruises and a broken neck hidden by the scarf and high-collared dress. Shue was tried for murder, and the key testimony was the mother-in-law recounting the visit from the ghost and the eerily accurate information it provided. The jury needed only an hour to find Shue guilty of murder. –Justin Kitch, Curious.com

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a murder trial that hinges on the testimony of a ghost.

Journaling Prompt: What is the strangest story you’ve ever heard about a ghost?

Art Prompt: Testimony of the ghost

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience an interesting story about unusual testimony in a court trial.

Photo Credit: Mer on Flickr

Elijah is a lost soul. He’s neither an angel nor a ghost, but a wandering spirit; a presence he can’t describe, although he has no desire to. Why describe something that those around you need no explanation for?
Elijah is only one of many souls that inhabit this place in between. It’s a dwelling of unexplained restlessness where one is trapped behind a glass wall, so to speak, unable to penetrate to the other side, unless they choose to do so. Elijah has nothing to search for, no memories exist for him. So he can’t ascertain why he’s unwilling to shake hands with fate and move on. –The Sharing Moon by Christy Campbell

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a lost soul like Elijah.

Journaling Prompt: What do you believe happens to the soul after death?

Art Prompt: Lost soul

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about a lost soul and include a moral.

Photo Credit: Christian Doelz on Flickr

Banshee

The Banshee never manifests itself to the person whose death it is prognosticating. Other people may see or hear it, but the fated one never, so that when everyone present is aware of it but one, the fate of that one may be regarded as pretty well certain. St. John Drelincourt, True Irish Ghost Stories

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a banshee in the modern world.

Journaling Prompt: What’s your favorite ghost story? What makes it scary to you?

Art Prompt: Banshee

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Create and share a ghost story.