Currently viewing the tag: "journaling prompt"

Backmasking is a recording technique in which a sound or message is recorded backward onto a track that is meant to be played forward. Backmasking is a deliberate process, whereas a message found through phonetic reversal may be unintentional.

Backmasking was popularised by The Beatles, who used backward instrumentation on their 1966 album Revolver. Artists have since used backmasking for artistic, comedic and satiric effect, on both analogue and digital recordings. The technique has also been used to censor words or phrases for “clean” releases of explicit songs.

Backmasking has been a controversial topic in the United States since the 1970s and popular during the 1980s and 1990s, when allegations from Christian groups of its use for Satanic purposes were made against prominent rock musicians, leading to record-burning protests and proposed anti-backmasking legislation by state and federal governments. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which an unorthodox form of communication is used to disguise the real message.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about hidden messages in music or film?

Art Prompt: Backmasking

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the Beatles scandal with backmasking.

Photo Credit: Scott Schiller on Flickr

He remembered a life that seemed simpler now because in those days he’d loved the answers more than the questions. –Lamentation (The Psalms of Isaak) by Ken Scholes

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about an old man whose way of thinking about life has taken a sudden flip.

Journaling Prompt: How have your opinions changed in the last year?

Art Prompt: Loving the questions

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how opinions and viewpoints change over time as people age.

Photo Credit: Xavi Talleda on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Paul K on Flickr

“It’s safe to say you killed them . . . isn’t that right?” –Last Winter, We Parted by Fuminori Nakamura, translated from the Japanese by Allison Markin Powell

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about something you feel guilty about.

Art Prompt: Guilty conscience

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about your guilty conscience.

Photo Credit: Craig Sunter on Flickr

Fighting in ice hockey is an established tradition of the sport in North America, with a long history that involves many levels of amateur and professional play and includes some notable individual fights. Fighting is usually performed by enforcers, or “goons”—players whose role is to fight and intimidate—on a given team, and is governed by a complex system of unwritten rules that players, coaches, officials, and the media refer to as “the code”. Some fights are spontaneous, while others are premeditated by the participants. While officials tolerate fighting during hockey games, they impose a variety of penalties on players who engage in fights.

Unique among North American professional team sports, the National Hockey League (NHL) and most minor professional leagues in North America do not eject players outright for fighting (although they may do so for more flagrant violations as part of a fight) but major European and collegiate hockey leagues do, and multi-game suspensions may be added on top of the ejection. Therefore, the vast majority of fights occur in the NHL and other North American professional leagues. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about fights in professional sports?

Art Prompt: Hockey

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of fighting in hockey.

Photo Credit: slgckgc on Flickr

Zombies had a bad reputation before they even existed, and it took a while for people to come to grips with the difference between the myth and the reality. –Sweet Kiss Apocalypse by Jen Rewell

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Are you ready for the zombie apocalypse?

Art Prompt: Zombies

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about how you believe the zombie apocalypse will come about.

Photo Credit: David Simmonds on Flickr

Although they did not fix their schedules to the clock in the modern sense, ancient civilizations adjusted daily schedules to the sun more flexibly than DST does, often dividing daylight into twelve hours regardless of daytime, so that each daylight hour was longer during summer. For example, the Romans kept time with water clocks that had different scales for different months of the year: at Rome’s latitude the third hour from sunrise, hora tertia, started by modern standards at 09:02 solar time and lasted 44 minutes at the winter solstice, but at the summer solstice it started at 06:58 and lasted 75 minutes. After ancient times, equal-length civil hours eventually supplanted unequal, so civil time no longer varies by season. Unequal hours are still used in a few traditional settings, such as some monasteries of Mount Athos and all Jewish ceremonies. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set in a location where the time changes all the time and from one city to another.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about daylight savings time?

Art Prompt: Time

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of daylight savings time.

Photo Credit: Juan Llanos on Flickr

The mist had melted, revealing babies on graves. Old graves, fresh graves, graves of people he had known and people who had died before he came to this church. Graves people cared for, and graves of people no one remembered. Every grave in this small cemetery had a baby on it. -A Hundred Babies by Nina Kiriki Hoffman

Fiction Writing Prompt: Where did the babies comes from? Write the story that leads up to this scene.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your last visit to a cemetary.

Art Prompt: Cemetary

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story that happens in a cemetary.

Photo Credit: Denise O’Brien on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Artistry on Big Happy Fun House

From two thousand feet, where Claudette Sanders was taking a flying lesson, the town of Chester’s Mill gleamed in the morning light like something freshly made and just set down. –Under the Dome by Stephen King

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the first time you ever flew in a plane.

Art Prompt: Aerial view

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how your home town has changed as shown by aerial view photos.

Photo Credit: srv007 on Flickr