Currently viewing the tag: "journaling prompt"

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Men on Last Door Down the Hall Blog

The stranger stared at Dora’s package. –Key To Lawrence by Linda Cargill

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel when a stranger stares at you? What do you do about it?

Art Prompt: Mystery package

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about a strange package.

booklegging n
  • The illicit publication and distribution of banned books.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: What’s your favorite banned book?

Art Prompt: Booklegging

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: The COM Library on Flickr

When Columbus first arrived in the New World, he described the indigenous people as friendly and causing no problems. He had been told by Queen Isabella to treat these people with respect and kindness, except if it became clear they are cannibals, in which case, all bets were off. Initially, the Spanish were looking for gold and, when they didn’t find it, they figured that the next best thing was slaves.

Lo and behold, when Columbus came back, the indigenous people who had previously been classified as friendly were suddenly described as cannibals, so you could do anything to them. You could enslave them, take their land, murder them, and treat them like pestilence. And that’s exactly what happened, with the result that a lot of the islands were de-populated. The idea of cannibalism as a taboo was used to de-humanize the people encountered on these conquests. –Cannibalism—the Ultimate Taboo—Is Surprisingly Common by Simon Worrall

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story involving cannibalism.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about the way that Columbus and other explorers dealt with natives in the new world?

Art Prompt: Cannibalism

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about cannibalism in the natural world.

Photo Credit: A Cannibal Feast in Fiji, 1869 on Wikimedia

On the 20th of March in 2019, Life Pharmaceuticals finally received Food and Drug Administration approval to market their new product LifereNew. This revolutionary product used micro-machines called nanites to repair cells. The nanites were so small, they could actually repair DNA, reverse the aging process, repair body damage and maintain the body. The promise was that after taking the product, you would lead a long life in a fit, young body. Most of humanity had dreamed of such a product. Needless to say, when LifereNew was approved, there was a rush on the market. People lined up to pay the $1,500,000 for the treatment, which potentially would extend their life hundreds and maybe thousands of years, while looking and feeling young and fit. New ReLife loans were set up so anyone could afford treatment, even though some folks would be paying back the loans for decades to come. Within six months, more than four million Americans experienced this life-changing procedure, the majority of those being rich retirees desperate to fend off death and start life anew. Not having to wait for a loan, they were the first to receive treatment. They became known as the New Lifers. –ZomoSapienS by David Moon

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set in a society where some people can afford to live as a young person forever but most people can’t.

Journaling Prompt: If you could afford this kind of treatment, would you have it? Why or why not?

Art Prompt: Fountain of Youth

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the current research in nanotechnology.

Photo Credit: Aida diLeto Lundquist on Flickr

…researchers assessed each individual’s homelessness, inpatient mental-health treatment, psychological symptoms of mental illness, substance use and as victims or perpetrators of violence. The researchers evaluated all of these items as both indicators and outcomes — i.e., as both causes and effects.

“We found that all of these indicators mattered, but often in different ways,” says Sarah Desmarais, an associate professor of psychology at NC State and co-author of the paper. “For example, drug use was a leading indicator of committing violence, while alcohol use was a leading indicator of being a victim of violence.”

However, the researchers also found that one particular category of psychological symptoms was also closely associated with violence: affective symptoms.

“By affect, we mean symptoms including anxiety, depressive symptoms and poor impulse control,” Desmarais says. “The more pronounced affective symptoms were, the more likely someone was to both commit violence and be a victim of violence…

…on average, the researchers found that one event in which a person was a victim of violence triggered seven other effects, such as psychological symptoms, homelessness and becoming perpetrators of violence. Those seven effects, on average, triggered an additional 39 additional effects.

“It’s a complex series of interactions that spirals over time, exacerbating substance use, mental-health problems and violent behavior,” Van Dorn says. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a protagonist with poor impulse control and high anxiety.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the state of your mental health and how it affects your behavior.

Art Prompt: Mental Illness and Violence

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell  your audience about the complicated relationship between mental illness and violence.

Photo Credit: Alvaro Tapia on Flickr

“Don’t panic.”
“I’m not panicking, I’m watching you panic. It’s more entertaining.”

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene where two people are trying not to panic.

Journaling Prompt: Write about what makes you panic and what you do when you’re panicked.

Art Prompt: Don’t panic!

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about a time that made you panic.

Photo Credit: Barry Mulling on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Rob DeGraff on Flickr

After one hundred and eighty-four days, the Sesquipedalian reached the end of the world. –Nova Verba, Mundus Novus by Ken Liu

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What do you imagine the end of the world will be like?

Art Prompt: The end of the world.

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about a long journey with an unexpected end.

Photo Credit: June Yarham on Flickr

scuffle v
  • (intransitive) To fight or struggle confusedly at close quarters.
  • (intransitive) To walk with a shuffling gait.
  • (slang) To make a living with difficulty, getting by on a low income, to struggle financially.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a fight that you had or watched when you were a kid. How do you feel about fighters?

Art Prompt: Scuffle

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Mark Mauno on Flickr