Currently viewing the tag: "ocean"

The Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916 were a series of shark attacks along the coast of New Jersey, in the United States, between July 1 and July 12, 1916, in which four people were killed and one injured. Since 1916, scholars have debated which shark species was responsible and the number of animals involved, with the great white shark and the bull shark most frequently cited. The incidents occurred during a deadly summer heat wave and polio epidemic in the United States that drove thousands of people to the seaside resorts of the Jersey Shore. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a rash of attacks by a natural force.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about sharks?

Art Prompt: Sharks

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about sharks.

Photo Credit: Philadelphia Inquirer July 15, 1916 on Wikimedia
Tagged with:
 

IN 1983, THE USS CORAL Sea CV-43 Catapult One was cruising the Atlantic Ocean, and the engineering department discovered a small problem. The ship had an excess of small plastic bottles, meant to test oil. Someone in the department came up with a fun way to deal with the overstock: Let the crew use them to send out messages into the open ocean. –Found: The Owner of a Message-in-a-Bottle Sent in 1983

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a message in a bottle.

Journaling Prompt: If you were writing a message to put in a bottle to set adrift at sea, what would it say?

Art Prompt: Message in a bottle

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story about a message in a bottle.

Photo Credit: World Oregon on Flickr

The Sunday Times Golden Globe Race was a non-stop, single-handed, round-the-world yacht race, held in 1968–1969, and was the first round-the-world yacht race. The race was controversial due to the failure of most competitors to finish the race and because of the suicide of one entrant; however, it ultimately led to the founding of the BOC Challenge and Vendée Globe round-the-world races, both of which continue to be successful and popular.

The race was sponsored by the British Sunday Times newspaper and was designed to capitalise on a number of individual round-the-world voyages which were already being planned by various sailors; for this reason, there were no qualification requirements, and competitors were offered the opportunity to join and permitted to start at any time between 1 June and 31 October 1968. The Golden Globe trophy was offered to the first person to complete an unassisted, non-stop single-handed circumnavigation of the world via the great capes, and a separate £5,000 prize was offered for the fastest single-handed circumnavigation.

Nine sailors started the race; four retired before leaving the Atlantic Ocean. Of the five remaining, Chay Blyth, who had set off with absolutely no sailing experience, sailed past the Cape of Good Hope before retiring; Nigel Tetley sank with 1,100 nautical miles (2,000 km) to go while leading; Donald Crowhurst, who, in desperation, attempted to fake a round-the-world voyage to avoid financial ruin, began to show signs of mental illness, and then committed suicide; and Bernard Moitessier, who rejected the philosophy behind a commercialised competition, abandoned the race while in a strong position to win and kept sailing non-stop until he reached Tahiti after circling the globe one and a half times. Robin Knox-Johnston was the only entrant to complete the race, becoming the first person to sail single-handed and non-stop around the world. He was awarded both prizes, and later donated the £5,000 to a fund supporting Crowhurst’s family. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a competition that must be completed singlehandedly and alone against great odds.

Journaling Prompt: What is the most challenging thing you’ve ever attempted alone? Write about the challenges you overcame.

Art Prompt: Yacht race

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about a person who overcame isolation and the elements and emerged triumphant.

Photo Credit: GoldenGlobeRaceRoute on Wikimedia

Just before eight o’clock (then about sundown, in that latitude) the cry of “All hands ahoy!” was sounded down the fore scuttle and the after hatchway, and hurrying upon deck, we found a large black cloud rolling on toward us from the south-west, and blackening the whole heavens. “Here comes Cape Horn!” said the chief mate; and we had hardly time to haul down and clew up, before it was upon us. In a few moments, a heavier sea was raised than I had ever seen before, and as it was directly ahead, the little brig, which was no better than a bathing machine, plunged into it, and all the forward part of her was under water; the sea pouring in through the bow-ports and hawse-hole and over the knightheads, threatening to wash everything overboard. In the lee scuppers it was up to a man’s waist. We sprang aloft and double reefed the topsails, and furled all the other sails, and made all snug. But this would not do; the brig was laboring and straining against the head sea, and the gale was growing worse and worse. At the same time sleet and hail were driving with all fury against us. We clewed down, and hauled out the reef-tackles again, and close-reefed the fore-topsail, and furled the main, and hove her to on the starboard tack. Here was an end to our fine prospects. –Before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana Jr.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of involving a ship and a storm..

Journaling Prompt: What is the most frightening weather disaster you’ve lived through.

Art Prompt: Storm at sea

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the true story of a dramatic shipwreck.

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Tromsø 2013 06 05 2380 on Wikimedia

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: High Tide on Last Door Down the Hall Blog

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

On November 20, the crew sighted a huge male sperm whale leading a pod. Three small whaling boats were launched under the command of the captain and the ship’s two mates. They had soon managed to corral several of the whales when a calf smashed into Chase’s boat forcing him to return to the main ship. It was then that the young cabin boy Nickerson spotted a looming shape underneath the bow of the Essex. It was a mighty sperm whale some 85 feet long, weighing as much as 80 tons.

First mate Owen Chase wrote later how he saw the whale “appear with ten-fold fury and vengeance in his aspect. The surf flew in all directions about him with the continual violent thrashing of his tail. His head about half out of the water, and in that way he came upon us, and again struck the ship … I could distinctly see him smite his jaws together as if distracted with rage and fury.”

The huge creature smashed into the Essex repeatedly, on each occasion causing it to list even more. The men just had time to save some of the provisions and regroup in three small whaling boats before their ship succumbed to the waves. “My God, Mr. Chase, what is the matter?” Captain Pollard asked in utter shock. “We have been stove by a whale,” came the bitter reply. –This Real-Life Whaling Disaster Inspired ‘Moby-Dick’ By Xabier Armenda´riz

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a huge disaster that is inspired by a true story.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the biggest disaster in your life and what you learned from surviving it.

Art Prompt: Whales

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about using real-life events to inspire creativity.

Photo Credit: Walfang zwischen 1856 und 1907 on Wikimedia

Mutiny_on_the_Bounty mondy

The mutiny on the Royal Navy vessel HMS Bounty occurred in the south Pacific on 28 April 1789. Disaffected crewmen, led by Acting Lieutenant Fletcher Christian, seized control of the ship from their captain, Lieutenant William Bligh, and set him and 18 loyalists adrift in the ship’s open launch. The mutineers variously settled on Tahiti or on Pitcairn Island. Bligh meanwhile completed a voyage of more than 3,500 nautical miles (6,500 km; 4,000 mi) in the launch to reach safety, and began the process of bringing the mutineers to justice.

Bounty had left England in 1787 on a mission to collect and transport breadfruit plants from Tahiti to the West Indies. A five-month layover in Tahiti, during which many of the men lived ashore and formed relationships with native Polynesians, proved harmful to discipline. Relations between Bligh and his crew deteriorated after he began handing out increasingly harsh punishments, criticism and abuse, Christian being a particular target. After three weeks back at sea, Christian and others forced Bligh from the ship. Twenty-five men remained on board afterwards, including loyalists held against their will and others for whom there was no room in the launch.

After Bligh reached England in April 1790, the Admiralty despatched HMS Pandora to apprehend the mutineers. Fourteen were captured in Tahiti and imprisoned on board Pandora, which then searched without success for Christian’s party that had hidden on Pitcairn Island. After turning back toward England Pandora ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef, with the loss of 31 crew and 4 prisoners from Bounty. The 10 surviving detainees reached England in June 1792 and were court martialled; 4 were acquitted, 3 were pardoned, and 3 were hanged. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set during any part of the story of the Bounty or create a mutiny in your own story.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when you felt like mutinying.

Art Prompt: Mutiny!

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of a famous mutiny.