Currently viewing the tag: "parents"

helicopter parent

“When parents become intrusive in their children’s lives, it may signal to the children that what they do is never good enough. As a result, the child may become afraid of making the slightest mistake and will blame himself or herself for not being ‘perfect’. Over time, such behaviour, known as maladaptive perfectionism, may be detrimental to the child’s well-being as it increases the risk of the child developing symptoms of depression, anxiety and even suicide in very serious cases,” said Assistant Professor Ryan Hong, who led the study which was conducted by a team of researchers from the Department of Psychology at the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where the conflict stems from a helicopter parent.

Journaling Prompt: How did your parents handle your upbringing? Did they pay enough attention? Too little? Too much? How did this affect you?

Art Prompt: Helicopter parent

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the dangers of helicopter parenting.

Photo Credit: Greg Williams on Flickr

toddler tantrum

In their second and third years of life, then, boys decisively will turn away from their mother. They de-identify with what she is. But their pulling away, their protective shield, may involve a number of anti-female defenses. And so it may be that the price males pay for de-identification is a disdain, a contempt, sometimes even a hatred for women, a disowning of the “feminine” parts of themselves and an enduring fear of intimacy because it undermines the separation upon which their male identity has been founded.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a man whose protective shield blocks him from having any meaningful relationships.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a man you know who can’t identify with the feminine aspects of his being. How does that affect his relationships?

Art Prompt: De-Identification with Mom

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience why de-identification with your parents is important and give them strategies for making sure that they have a healthy relationship with all aspects of themselves.

Photo Credit: Jessica Lucia on Flickr

Emma

Alice was always the favorite child, the perfect kid in the family. She was only a year older but she had everything I could ever wish for. From the perfect boyfriend to high school fame, the beautiful Alice Miller had it all. My parents adored her, treated her as if she was some sort of trophy child, and now that she had just started college, they gave her more attention than usual. –Cursed By Desire by Maryam Malik

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a favorite child from the point of view of a sibling.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your siblings.

Art Prompt: Favorite child

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the challenges of parenting, including the problem of favoring one child over another.

Photo Credit: Dan Foy on Flickr

Mother o' Mine  .. Happy Mothers Day

It doesn’t seem to matter what kind of mother a child has lost, or how perilous it may be to dwell in her presence. It doesn’t matter whether she hurts or hugs. Separation from mother is worse than being in her arms while bombs are exploding. Separation from mother is sometimes worse than being with her when she is the bomb.
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For the presence of mother – our mother – stands for safety. Fear of her loss is the earliest terror we know. –Necessary Losses by Judith Viorst

Fiction Writing Prompt: Work on your character sketch, then write a story about your protagonist’s relationship with his or her mother at different ages.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your feelings for your mother and how they change over time.

Art Prompt: Separation from mother

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching or humorous story about your relationship with your mother.

Photo Credit: Nick Kenrick on Flickr

Mother & Daughter

Madonna Kolbenschlag notes, “We come into the world as mirror images of our mother – destined to be not only her reflector, but also her silent inquisitor. The relationship between mother and daughter is the most intimate, most intense, most symbiotic and symmetrical bond known to humans.” Mother and daughter start off as a single united set of desires, one that can be challenging for the daughter to reject without rejecting the mother’s love, while the mother has an equally hard time accepting the daughter as a distinct individual motivated by her own desires. –From Girl to Goddess: The Heroine’s Journey through Myth and Legend by Valerie Estelle Frankel

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or scene that illustrates the complicated relationship between a mother and daughter.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your relationship with your mother.

Art Prompt: Mother and Daughter

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about your relationship with your mother.

Photo Credit: David J Laporte on Flickr

Mom

“You have to stop and get milk first. We’re out of milk.” He raised an eyebrow at me. Both of mine shot up in response. He tried to stare me down. Either he didn’t know me as well as I’d thought, or he was ignoring an integral facet of my nature. I am the Queen of Stare Downs. Twelve years as a mother hardens you and gives you superpowers of Guilt and Shame. -Nicole Hamlett, Rifts

Fiction Writing Prompt: Include the power of a mom’s stare in your story or scene.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a special look your mom used on you.

Art Prompt: A mom’s stare

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about your mom’s stare.

Photo Credit: Neil Coleman on Flickr

Baby Shower Cupcakes

Communication researchers who interviewed childless individuals for a study recently published online in the National Communication Association’sJournal of Applied Communication Research found that expanding definitions of family often don’t embrace people without children. These individuals felt that work and family discussions isolated or belittled them, and that sometimes they were expected to fill in for absent workers because of more liberal attitudes toward parents. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or a scene from the point of view of someone who doesn’t have children.

Journaling Prompt: Whether you have children or not, how do the results of this study make you feel? Write about you see yourself in society based on your status as a parent or a childless person.

Art Prompt: Without children

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Inform your audience about this study and make some suggestions about how parents can be more understanding about the feelings of those without children.

Photo Credit: clevercupcakes on Flickr

Scream

“We send children mixed signals by telling them that monsters aren’t real while we tell them stories about the tooth fairy,” he explains. Simply telling a child that their fear isn’t realistic doesn’t solve the problem, he says. Prof. Sadeh recommends using the child’s strong imagination as a treatment. For instance, parents might help their children view an imaginary monster as a non-threatening entity, perhaps by writing it a letter to extend an offer of friendship or reading the child a book in which a threatening figure turns out to be friendly. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or poem about the monsters under the bed.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your childhood fears and how your parents helped you deal with them.

Art Prompt: Monsters under the Bed

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about helping children get past their night time fears.

Photo Credit: 19melissa68 on Flickr

Tanning on Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, 1958

I am fifty-four years old, the age my mother was when she died. – Terry Tempest Williams, When Women Were Birds: Fifty-four Variations on Voice

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your relationship with your mother. Do you ever think about what she was doing when she was your age? 

Art Prompt: My mother’s age

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about your mother.

Photo Credit: ChrisWarren1956 on Flickr

20080831 - hanging out - 166-6671 - Eve, Tabbitha - hiding her laughing

“Mama always hid her mouth when she laughed.” – Tupelo Hassman, Girlchild

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your mother and her mannerisms.

Art Prompt: Mom laughs

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Use the first line of the week as an inspiration for your speech or article this week.