Currently viewing the tag: "prejudice"

Fat shaming on social media has become prevalent and weight is the most common reason children are bullied in school with 85 percent of surveyed adolescents reportedly seeing overweight classmates teased in gym class, McHugh said.

Evidence confirms that fat shaming is not an effective approach to reducing obesity or improving health, McHugh said. “Rather, stigmatization of obese individuals poses serious risks to their psychological health,” she added. “Research demonstrates that weight stigma leads to psychological stress, which can lead to poor physical and psychological health outcomes for obese people.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which conflict is driven by shaming based on a physical characterist.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about fat people? What thoughts pop into your mind when you see someone who is fat?

Art Prompt: Fat Shamin

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about fat shaming on social media in today’s culture.

Photo Credit: Facebook Screen Capture

Tuskeegee Airmen medallion

The strict racial segregation the U.S. Army required gave way in the face of the requirements for complex training in technical vocations. Typical of the process was the development of separate African-American flight surgeons to support the operations and training of the Tuskegee Airmen. Before the development of this unit, no U.S. Army flight surgeons had been black. Training of African-American men as aviation medical examiners was conducted through correspondence courses until 1943, when two black physicians were admitted to the U.S. Army School of Aviation Medicine at Randolph Field, Texas. This was one of the earliest racially integrated courses in the U.S. Army. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of someone who overcomes a prejudice or bias.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when you overcame someone’s bias against you.

Art Prompt: Overcome

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell the story of how our military forces overcame segregation.

Photo Credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture on Flickr

In five experiments, subjects were shown multiple images of people on a computer screen and determined whether the person was holding a gun or a neutral object such as a soda can or cell phone. Subjects did this while holding either a toy gun or a neutral object such as a foam ball.

The researchers varied the situation in each experiment — such as having the people in the images sometimes wear ski masks, changing the race of the person in the image or changing the reaction subjects were to have when they perceived the person in the image to hold a gun. Regardless of the situation the observers found themselves in, the study showed that responding with a gun biased observers to report “gun present” more than did responding with a ball. Thus, by virtue of affording the subject the opportunity to use a gun, he or she was more likely to classify objects in a scene as a gun and, as a result, to engage in threat-induced behavior, such as raising a firearm to shoot.

“Beliefs, expectations and emotions can all influence an observer’s ability to detect and to categorize objects as guns,” Brockmole says. “Now we know that a person’s ability to act in certain ways can bias their recognition of objects as well, and in dramatic ways. It seems that people have a hard time separating their thoughts about what they perceive and their thoughts about how they can or should act.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or poem about jumping to a dangerous conclusion.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when you have jumped to a wrong conclusion.

Art Prompt: Observer Bias

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about observer bias and how it affects our society.

Photo Credit: @LIQUIDBONEZ on Flickr

Carnival

“Prejudices are — especially because they are formed quickly and easily — often convenient in the everyday world but fail when the situation becomes more complicated,” Dirk Helbing concludes. In order to illustrate this, the researchers took interferences into consideration as they exist in the real world. What happens, for instance, if participants are wrongly assessed and certain traits do not necessarily have anything to with the behaviour? Then prejudiced players are unable to adjust their strategy. The longer they play, the more they come up short in comparison. Differentiated strategies fare better. And what happens if the participants simply behave randomly? In this instance, the result deteriorates for all strategies. However, the more players act randomly, the more dismally players with prejudices perform…”While it is efficient to react to a single trait in the beginning, you must not stop learning new things in a complex world; otherwise, you miss many good opportunities,” explains Helbing. However, developing a differentiated — and in the long run successful — judgement takes time. “The most successful strategy is to begin with simple rules of thumb and then keep refining them,” says Helbing. People who gain a wide range of experiences and are willing to adapt their behaviour accordingly perform the best. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a character who makes a snap judgement based on prejudice and that decision goes wrong.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a prejudice that you have that has caused you to make a bad decision.

Art Prompt: Snap Decision

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about prejudice and how it affects decisions in critical situations.

Photo Credit: m_dougherty on Flickr

Nice Hoodie

People who are prejudiced feel a much stronger need to make quick and firm judgments and decisions in order to reduce ambiguity. “Of course, everyone has to make decisions, but some people really hate uncertainty and therefore quickly rely on the most obvious information, often the first information they come across, to reduce it” Roets says. That’s also why they favor authorities and social norms which make it easier to make decisions. Then, once they’ve made up their mind, they stick to it. “If you provide information that contradicts their decision, they just ignore it.”

Roets argues that this way of thinking is linked to people’s need to categorize the world, often unconsciously. “When we meet someone, we immediately see that person as being male or female, young or old, black or white, without really being aware of this categorization,” he says. “Social categories are useful to reduce complexity, but the problem is that we also assign some properties to these categories. This can lead to prejudice and stereotyping.” –Science Daily

Writing Prompt: Write a character’s inner monologue as they meet someone who is different from them in some significant way.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a prejudice you have and where you think it comes from.

Art Prompt: Prejudice
Non-Fiction/Speechwriting Prompt: Write about the effect of prejudice on society.

Photo Credit: Rick Camacho on Flickr