Currently viewing the tag: "reading"

It was Saturday, 9:17 am; Joanna sighed, “Finally this week is over!” With the newspaper spread out before her, this would be a day of luxury, doing nothing, even if it were for only a few hours. –Serpentine Enigma by Charles Domina

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write about what happens next to interrupt her plans.

Journaling Prompt: What do you enjoy doing on Saturday mornings?

Art Prompt: Saturday morning

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about your weekend routine.

Photo Credit: nvainio on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Reading Wendy on Big Happy Fun House

booklegging n
  • The illicit publication and distribution of banned books.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: What’s your favorite banned book?

Art Prompt: Booklegging

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: The COM Library on Flickr

Reading outside

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: José Ferraz de Almeida Júnior on Wikimedia

woman offers book

This is my favorite book in all the world, though I have never read it. –The Princess Bride by William Goldman

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What book tempts you even though you’ve never read it?

Art Prompt: Favorite book

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about your favorite book.

Photo Credit: Rayani on Flickr

Reading is a habit of mine, not a hobby but a habit. It seems I just can’t get enough. I will read anything. –Color Me Grey by J.C. Phelps

Fiction Writing Prompt: Add to your character sketch: what’s on your protagonist’s reading list?

Journaling Prompt: Write about the last book you read and what you learned from it.

Art Prompt: Reading

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience why leaders are readers.

Photo Credit: Paul on Free Digital Photos

Pictureadingre

Perhaps there is some secret sort of homing instinct in books that brings them to their perfect readers. How delightful if that were true. -Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a book that engages in a quest to find the perfect reader.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a book that changed your life.

Art Prompt: Reading

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about a book that changed your life.

Photo Credit: murphyeppoon on Flickr

Embraced by Words

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo by Robbert van der Steeg on Flickr.

 

Seeing the books, Diana felt a flash of recognition. From these volumes, she had gained her love of reading, her fascination with the written word. She pulled out each book individually, thumbing through the pages, glancing at the familiar illustrations, remembering her favorite stories, wishing Davy knew them the way she did. -J.A. Jance, Hour of the Hunter

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write about a character who shares his or her love of reading with another person.

Journaling Prompt: What are your favorite books and why?

Art Prompt: Books

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Persuade your audience of the importance of being life-long learners.

Photo Credit: Stewart Butterfield on Flickr

VOTE

In the voting study, 82 undergraduates who were registered and eligible to vote were assigned to read one of four versions of a short story about a student enduring several obstacles on the morning of Election Day (such as car problems, rain, long lines) before ultimately entering the booth to cast a vote. This experiment took place several days before the 2008 November presidential election.

Some versions were written in first person (“I entered the voting booth) while some were written in third person (“Paul entered the voting booth”). In addition, some versions featured a student who attended the same university as the participants, while in other versions, the protagonist in the story attended a different university.

After reading the story, the participants completed a questionnaire that measured their level of experience-taking — how much they adopted the perspective of the character in the story. For example, they were asked to rate how much they agreed with statements like “I found myself feeling what the character in the story was feeling” and “I felt I could get inside the character’s head.”

The results showed that participants who read a story told in first-person, about a student at their own university, had the highest level of experience-taking. And a full 65 percent of these participants reported they voted on Election Day, when they were asked later.

In comparison, only 29 percent of the participants voted if they read the first-person story about a student from a different university. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a reader who becomes entranced with a character in a story.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a character that you identified with.

Art Prompt: Reading

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Write about how the books we read affect our lives.

Photo Credit: Theresa Thompson on Flickr