Currently viewing the tag: "relationships"

My husband used to start my car for me on cold mornings, would turn the heater on full blast as he brushed off the snow and ice. I guess we’re even now. I used to make lunches for him to take to work, but no more. I’d hand him the bulky paper bag with a kiss and a whisper about last night or tonight after the girls are in bed. I packed him heart-healthy meals, since his cholesterol was up: turkey sandwiches on whole wheat, oat bran muffins, baggies of grapes or sliced carrots. I quit doing it when I found the cache of uneaten lunches stuffed behind the seat of his truck, along with the crumpled McDonald’s bags and dented soda cups.

Loving gestures, long gone. –HARD FROST BY REGINA BUTTNER

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a dying love.

Journaling Prompt: What are some loving things you used to do for your spouse or partner that you don’t do anymore? Why?

Art Prompt: Loving gestures

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about some small things they can do to improve their relationship.

Photo Credit: Dennis S. Hurd on Flickr

“I’m so sorry.”

As the words slipped from Jane’s mouth, another blue Line of Apology on her arm disappeared in a searing–but brief–slice of pain. She only had ten Apology Lines left. Most people her age had blue streaks marking their arms all the way to shoulder. –Apology Accepted by Kathryn Felice Board

Fiction Writing Prompt: Create a world where empathy is a real, but limited power. How will your protagonist use it?

Journaling Prompt: Write about the best and worst apologies you’ve ever recieved.

Art Prompt: I’m so sorry

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience how to apologize properly.

Photo Credit: bronx. on Flickr

Negative attitudes about others are often formed at a young age, and they’re thought to remain relatively stable throughout adulthood. However, few studies have examined whether implicit social biases can change. In recent years, however, Professor Manos Tsakiris of the Royal Holloway University of London and Professor Mel Slater of University College London and the University of Barcelona have developed ways to expose participants to bodily illusions that induce ownership over a body different from their own with respect to race, age, or gender. For white people who were made to feel that they had black bodies, their unconscious biases against black people diminished. And adults who felt as if they had children’s bodies processed perceptual information and aspects of themselves as being more childlike. –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where an actual body swap occurs.

Journaling Prompt: What type of person do you have negative thoughts about? How could you begin to see things through their eyes?

Art Prompt: Body swap

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about this research and how implementing it might change the direction of our world.

Photo Credit: Mr. Bob on Flickr

My parents knew I was a witch before I was born. –The Key to St. Medusa’s by KAT HOWARD

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What did your parents believe about you before you were born?

Art Prompt: Witch

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of how your parents expectations for you shaped your development.

Photo Credit: Ши3андра Пожар on Flickr

There are those who suggests that a child is a tabula rasa when born, a blank page, which remains to be filled out by life experience. That is not true. Children are born with encoded nature of their genetic being, and they are born with a history of their culture and their family infused into their very conception, and as the context into which they are received. This becomes what is innate and in each of us yearns to be heard and recognized, to be named and known in relationship to others-to exist. –In the Moment: Celebrating the Everyday by Harvey L Rich, M.D.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the background of your protagonist, considering genetics, culture, and family history. 

Journaling Prompt: What part of your personality do you believe you were born with and what came through life experiences?

Art Prompt: My personality

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the interplay between innate personality and life experiences in shaping a personality.

Photo Credit: Jlhopgood on Flickr

In a survey of 1,308 U.S. adult Facebook users, University of British Columbia researchers found that 24 per cent — or more than one in five — had snooped on the Facebook accounts of their friends, romantic partners or family members, using the victims’ own computers or cellphones.

“It’s clearly a widespread practice. Facebook private messages, pictures or videos are easy targets when the account owner is already logged on and has left their computer or mobile open for viewing,” said Wali Ahmed Usmani, study author and computer science master’s student.

People admitted to spying on their friends, family, and romantic partners out of simple curiosity or fun — for example, setting a victim’s status or profile picture to something humorous. But other motives were darker, such as jealousy or animosity.

“Jealous snoops generally plan their action and focus on personal messages, accessing the account for 15 minutes or longer,” said computer science professor Ivan Beschastnikh, a senior author on the paper.

“And the consequences are significant: in many cases, snooping effectively ended the relationship.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where the conflict is driven by Facebook snooping.

Journaling Prompt: How would you feel if you found out someone you trusted was snooping through your private messages?

Art Prompt: Facebook snooping

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the phenomenon of Facebook snooping and give them the steps to prevent it from happening to them.

Photo Credit: York VISIOn on Flickr

“Meet me tomorrow?” she said. –Under the Eaves by LAVIE TIDHAR

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a secret rendezvous you had as a young person.

Art Prompt: Rendezvous

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story of a young love.

Photo Credit: Suzette – www.suzette.nu on Flickr

Fat shaming on social media has become prevalent and weight is the most common reason children are bullied in school with 85 percent of surveyed adolescents reportedly seeing overweight classmates teased in gym class, McHugh said.

Evidence confirms that fat shaming is not an effective approach to reducing obesity or improving health, McHugh said. “Rather, stigmatization of obese individuals poses serious risks to their psychological health,” she added. “Research demonstrates that weight stigma leads to psychological stress, which can lead to poor physical and psychological health outcomes for obese people.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which conflict is driven by shaming based on a physical characterist.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about fat people? What thoughts pop into your mind when you see someone who is fat?

Art Prompt: Fat Shamin

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about fat shaming on social media in today’s culture.

Photo Credit: Facebook Screen Capture

How do you keep going after the one person you always believed you were meant to be with forever gives their heart to someone else? –Redemption by LA Kuehlke

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a bad break up you went through and how you felt at that time.

Art Prompt: Lost love

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about lost love.

Photo Credit: Dennis Skley on Flickr



…research shows many people have homicidal thoughts or fantasies (as many as 79 percent of men and 66 percent of women in a 1993 survey of university students), DeLisi said. It becomes a problem when those thoughts progress to contemplating situations in which homicide is appropriate, forecasting consequences of murder or simulating the act of killing.

“For most people, the thoughts are short-lived and related to a dispute. They may think about killing someone instantaneously, but once they cool down they’re OK,” DeLisi said. “For correctional clients, it’s part of their emotional life. They have a lot of anger, hostility and psychopathology. They think people are out to get them and they’re very aggressive, so some of these severe offenders contemplate homicide.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of someone who escalates from contemplation to execution of a homicide and the aftermath.

Journaling Prompt: Have you ever fantasied about hurting someone? Write about that experience, however brief it may have been. What did you learn about yourself?

Art Prompt: Fantasies

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how dangerous fantasies can be and how to deal with them when they happen.

Photo Credit: Andy on Flickr