Currently viewing the tag: "relationships"

“Meet me tomorrow?” she said. –Under the Eaves by LAVIE TIDHAR

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a secret rendezvous you had as a young person.

Art Prompt: Rendezvous

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story of a young love.

Photo Credit: Suzette – www.suzette.nu on Flickr

Fat shaming on social media has become prevalent and weight is the most common reason children are bullied in school with 85 percent of surveyed adolescents reportedly seeing overweight classmates teased in gym class, McHugh said.

Evidence confirms that fat shaming is not an effective approach to reducing obesity or improving health, McHugh said. “Rather, stigmatization of obese individuals poses serious risks to their psychological health,” she added. “Research demonstrates that weight stigma leads to psychological stress, which can lead to poor physical and psychological health outcomes for obese people.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which conflict is driven by shaming based on a physical characterist.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about fat people? What thoughts pop into your mind when you see someone who is fat?

Art Prompt: Fat Shamin

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about fat shaming on social media in today’s culture.

Photo Credit: Facebook Screen Capture

How do you keep going after the one person you always believed you were meant to be with forever gives their heart to someone else? –Redemption by LA Kuehlke

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a bad break up you went through and how you felt at that time.

Art Prompt: Lost love

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about lost love.

Photo Credit: Dennis Skley on Flickr



…research shows many people have homicidal thoughts or fantasies (as many as 79 percent of men and 66 percent of women in a 1993 survey of university students), DeLisi said. It becomes a problem when those thoughts progress to contemplating situations in which homicide is appropriate, forecasting consequences of murder or simulating the act of killing.

“For most people, the thoughts are short-lived and related to a dispute. They may think about killing someone instantaneously, but once they cool down they’re OK,” DeLisi said. “For correctional clients, it’s part of their emotional life. They have a lot of anger, hostility and psychopathology. They think people are out to get them and they’re very aggressive, so some of these severe offenders contemplate homicide.” –Science Daily

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of someone who escalates from contemplation to execution of a homicide and the aftermath.

Journaling Prompt: Have you ever fantasied about hurting someone? Write about that experience, however brief it may have been. What did you learn about yourself?

Art Prompt: Fantasies

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how dangerous fantasies can be and how to deal with them when they happen.

Photo Credit: Andy on Flickr

Mom and Dad are cheerful, almost giddy, because Granny’s having a good day: not throwing things, not screaming that she hates Dad, that she’d rather be dead. –Tomorrow Is Winter by Callie Snow

Fiction Writing Prompt: Tell the story of an elderly person who terrorizes his/her family.

Journaling Prompt: Describe your parents’ relationships with their parents. How does this affect you?

Art Prompt: Granny’s having a good day

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the issues with eldercare in our society.

Photo Credit: xxx on Flickr

If I am honest, we are strangers sitting together. Though we lived in the same house, survived similar ordeals, we have each grown to become our own women. With time we have learned to hold our secrets close rather than share. –Sejal Badani, Trail of Broken Wings

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of siblings who endured abuse and their relationship with each other.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your relationship with your sibling(s).

Art Prompt: Sisters

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about something you and one of your siblings went through together.

Photo Credit: Tom Brandt on Flickr

She went her unremembering way,
She went and left in me
The pang of all the partings gone,
And partings yet to be.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story, poem, or haiku about partings.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the loss of someone you loved.

Art Prompt: Partings

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story about a loss that changed your life.

Photo Credit: Thomas Hawk on Flickr

During his first marriage to Catherine of Aragon, Henry conducted an affair with Mary Boleyn, Catherine’s lady-in-waiting. There has been speculation that Mary’s two children, Henry and Catherine Carey, were fathered by Henry, but this has never been proved, and the King never acknowledged them as he did Henry FitzRoy.
In 1525, as Henry grew more impatient with Catherine’s inability to produce the male heir he desired, he became enamoured of Mary Boleyn’s sister, Anne, then a charismatic young woman of 25 in the Queen’s entourage. Anne, however, resisted his attempts to seduce her, and refused to become his mistress as her sister Mary Boleyn had. It was in this context that Henry considered his three options for finding a dynastic successor and hence resolving what came to be described at court as the King’s “great matter”. These options were legitimising Henry FitzRoy, which would take the intervention of the pope and would be open to challenge; marrying off Mary as soon as possible and hoping for a grandson to inherit directly, but Mary was considered unlikely to conceive before Henry’s death; or somehow rejecting Catherine and marrying someone else of child-bearing age. Probably seeing the possibility of marrying Anne, the third was ultimately the most attractive possibility to the 34-year-old Henry, and it soon became the King’s absorbing desire to annul his marriage to the now 40-year-old Catherine. It was a decision that would lead Henry to reject papal authority and initiate the English Reformation. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story based in a royal court full of intrigue.

Journaling Prompt: Do you believe that the church and the state should both be involved in marriage?

Art Prompt: Anne Boleyn

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of the King’s Great Matter and how it has affected the world to this day.

She was beautiful when she was angry, and she was more than beautiful today. –Celtic Skies by Delaney Rhodes

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about someone who is in love with an angry woman.

Journaling Prompt: How do you act when you get angry.

Art Prompt: My anger

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a story about a time when you got angry and what you learned from that experience.

Photo Credit: Matthew Kenwrick on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Wedding Bells on Last Door Down the Hall Blog