Currently viewing the tag: "religion"

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The Shroud of Turin or Turin Shroud (Italian: Sindone di Torino, Sacra Sindone [‘sa?kra ‘sindone] or Santa Sindone), a length of linen cloth bearing the image of a man, is believed by some Christians to be the burial shroud of Jesus of Nazareth, although three radiocarbon dating tests in 1988 dated a sample of the cloth to the Middle Ages. The shroud is kept in the royal chapel of the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Turin, northern Italy. The Catholic Church has neither formally endorsed nor rejected the shroud, but in 1958 Pope Pius XII approved of the image in association with the devotion to the Holy Face of Jesus…

…The image on the shroud is much clearer in black-and-white negative than in its natural sepia color, and this negative image was first observed in 1898 on the reverse photographic plate of amateur photographer Secondo Pia, who was allowed to photograph it while it was being exhibited. A variety of methods have been proposed for the formation of the image, but the actual method used has not yet been conclusively identified. Despite numerous investigations and tests, the status of the Shroud of Turin remains murky, and the nature of the image and how it was fixed on the cloth remain puzzling. The shroud continues to be both intensely studied and controversial. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story involving a mystery around a religious relic.

Journaling Prompt: Are mysteries surround religious relics important to your faith or not? Why?

Art Prompt: Shroud of Turin

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the history of the Shroud of Turin.

Photo Credit: Shroud of Turin on Wikimedia

tuesday virgin

Wolves populated Nero’s court, Flavia had learned. At first, they’d seemed friendly—concerned for the poor virgin held hostage in the palace. But swiftly Rome’s aristocracy had turned, circling her with hungry eyes, hearts pounding with envy, drooling for her devastation. –Suzanne Tyrpak, Vestal Virgin: Romantic suspense in ancient Rome

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a vestal virgin in Nero’s Rome.

Journaling Prompt: Have you ever felt like you were being held hostage? How did you feel about the situation? 

Art Prompt: Held hostage

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about vestal virgins in ancient Rome.

Photo Credit: Michael Day on Flickr

wed The_Ducking-Stool_from_Curious_Punishments_of_Bygone_Days_(1896)

In the common law of crime in England and Wales, a common scold was a species of public nuisance—a troublesome and angry woman who broke the public peace by habitually arguing and quarrelling with her neighbours. The Latin name for the offender, communis rixatrix, appears in the feminine gender and makes it clear that only women could commit this crime.

The offence, which was exported to North America with the colonists, was punishable by ducking: being placed in a chair and submerged in a river or pond. Although rarely prosecuted it remained on the statute books in England and Wales until 1967. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Create an offense for your story that is gender-specific. Include a punishment that is specific to this offense.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about punishments, whether legal or cultural, that are specifically anti-woman?

Art Prompt: Public nuisance

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of patriarchy and choose one example to illustrate your feelings about it.

wed papal conclave

A papal conclave is a meeting of the College of Cardinals convened to elect a new Bishop of Rome, also known as the Pope. The pope is considered by Roman Catholics to be the apostolic successor of Saint Peter and earthly head of the Roman Catholic Church. The conclave has been the procedure for choosing the pope for almost a thousand years, and is the oldest ongoing method for choosing the leader of an institution.

A history of political interference in papal selection and consequently long vacancies between popes, culminating in the interregnum of 1268–1271, prompted Pope Gregory X to decree during the Second Council of Lyons in 1274 that the cardinal electors should be locked in seclusion cum clave (Latin for “with a key”) and not permitted to leave until a new Bishop of Rome had been elected. Conclaves are now held in the Sistine Chapel of the Apostolic Palace. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set during a papal conclave.

Journaling Prompt: How do you believe spiritual leaders should be selected or determined? How is that done in your spiritual practice?

Art Prompt: Papal conclave

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the intrigues surrounding one of the papal conclaves.

Photo Credit: Bendicion pio X.JPG on Wikimedia

tuesday ritual

Native societies did not think of themselves as being in the world as occupants but considered that their rituals created the world and keep it operational. -Marshall McLuhan, College and University Journal, Volumes 6-7, American College Public Relations Association, 1967, p. 3

Fiction Writing Prompt: Create a ritual for your story’s culture or a personal ritual for one of your characters.

Journaling Prompt: What is your most important ritual?

Art Prompt: Ritual

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about one of your rituals.

Photo Credit: danielle tineke on Flickr

tuesday st triduana

St. Triduana devoted herself to God in a solitary life at Rescobie in Angus (now Forfarshire). While dwelling there, a prince of the country having conceived an unlawful passion for her is said to have pursued her with his unwelcome attentions. To rid herself of his importunities, as a legend relates, Triduana bravely plucked out her beautiful eyes, her chief attraction, and sent them to her admirer. Her heroism, it is said, procured for her the power of curing diseases of the eyes. –A Calendar of Scottish Saints by Michael Barrett

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a woman who tries everything to get rid of a stalker.

Journaling Prompt: What is the most extreme thing you’ve ever done to try to achieve a goal?

Art Prompt: St. Triduana

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about St. Triduana.

Photo Credit: Richard Milnes on Flickr

prophet friday

presage v
  • (transitive) To predict or foretell something.
  • (intransitive) To make a prediction.
  • (transitive) To have a presentiment of; to feel beforehand; to foreknow.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: What do you believe about predicting the future?

Art Prompt: Make a prediction

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: stainedglassartist on Flickr

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In the Ancient Near East along the Tigris–Euphrates river system there were many shrines and temples or “houses of heaven” dedicated to various deities documented by the Ancient Greek historian Herodotus in The Histories where sacred prostitution was a common practice. It came to an end when the emperor Constantine in the fourth century AD destroyed the goddess temples and replaced them with Christianity. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a sacred prostitute.

Journaling Prompt: Write about your feelings about sex as a sacred act.

Art Prompt: Sacred prostitute

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the history of the houses of heaven and the women who worked in them.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

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Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Dan Gregory on Wikimedia

The Holy Pool of St. Fillan

At Strathfillan, there is a deep pool, called the Holy Pool, where, in olden times, they were wont to dip insane people. The ceremony was performed after sunset on the first day of the quarter, O. S.,* and before sunrise next morning. The dipped persons were instructed to take three stones from the bottom of the pool, and, walking three times round each of three cairns on the bank, throw a stone into each. They were next conveyed to the ruins of St Fillan’s chapel; and in a corner called St Fillan’s bed, they were laid on their back, and left tied all night. If next morning they were found loose, the cure was deemed perfect, and thanks returned to the saint. The pool is still (1843) visited, not by parishioners, for they have no faith in its virtue, but by people from other and distant places. –The Book of Days: A miscellany of popular antiquities in connection with the calendar, etc , W & R Chambers

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a miraculous healing at a holy pool.

Journaling Prompt: Do you believe in miracles?

Art Prompt: Miracle

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of a pilgrimage to a holy place.

Photo Credit: Willie Angus on Flickr