Currently viewing the tag: "sleep"

daymare
a distressing experience, similar to a bad dream, occurring while one is awake.
an acute anxiety attack.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: Do you take naps? If so, do you ever dream during your naps?

Art Prompt: Daymare

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Wolfie Rankin on Flickr

Three weeks into the school year the dreams began. She walked on soft grass under a dark purple sky, and the grass and trees around her shimmered and quivered with light. It was no place she had ever been, no place that could be in the world she knew, but she was calm there, and content. And one night a young man joined her, dressed in bright clothes and laughing gaily–and for the first time in ages she did not feel alone. –In Dreams by Jeremy Erman

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where a dream becomes more real than reality.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the most vivid dream you’ve ever had.

Art Prompt: In Dreams

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a humorous story about how a dream affected your reality.

Photo Credit: edward musiak on Flickr

napping

Because some hours might pass before food or questions again, I have taken to napping in the afternoon, while studying the brilliant white shaft of light that pours through the narrow recess overhead. Of clockwork regularity, it is a beautiful, deathless thing – the sort of incandescence one sees in very old books, generally for the edification of miracles, astonished masses and bleeding saints. Midday is its zenith, when its glorious blaze pierces my dim cell. –The People’s Hare by Michael Minnis

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a prisoner.

Journaling Prompt: What are your favorite things to do when you are bored?

Art Prompt: Afternoon nap

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about napping.

Photo Credit: dprotz on Flickr

warm milk

 

Maybe warm milk will make her sleepy. She turns on the kitchen light. The pots clang and echo. There is nothing more lonely than an empty, lit kitchen at two in the morning. She heats the milk, stirring slowly, feeling the spoon catch on the scalded bits at the bottom of the pan. She turns at the sound of a moth beating against the kitchen light. When the gas sputters off, and she stands next to the stove drinking her milk, there is no sound at all, except for the light scuffing she makes in her robe. The wallpaper she hung around the kitchen border last week isn’t exactly straight. Geese led with a blue ribbon by a girl, around and around the room. She’d balanced for hours on a kitchen chair, arms in the air, glue dripping off the brush.

She wipes the milk from her lips, and puts the pan in the sink. The curtains flutter. Maybe a walk will tire her out. –Water Ghosts by Shawna Yang Ryan


Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a woman awake and alone in the middle of the night. 

Journaling Prompt: What do you do when you can’t sleep?

Art Prompt: Insomnia

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about insomnia and give them some ideas to deal with it.

Photo Credit: yarko3 on Flickr

 

slugabed: one who stays in bed until a late hour.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: When do you choose to be a slugabed? What triggers that decision?

Art Prompt: Slugabed

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Smallest Forest on Flickr

Untitled

Jack Hawthorn had begun to dread sleep. He dreamed now, and most of those dreams were nightmares. He wasn’t used to fear: the drumming of his heart, the quickening of breath, the blood coursing through him. –Briar Queen: A Night and Nothing Novel by Katherine Harbour

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about sleep?

Art Prompt: Dreading sleep

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a story about a dream you had.

Photo Credit: starlights_ on Flickr
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A Creepy Shadow

Moonlight filled our bedroom with windblown tree shadows and uncertain light that gathered in pools on the carpet. Gabe still slept peacefully next to me, one hand splayed on his chest and unaware anything was amiss. –A Barricade in Hell by Jaime Lee Moyer

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the experience of being awake at night next to your sleeping partner or child.

Art Prompt: Moonlight and shadows

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell the story about  a night when you had insomnia and how you spent it.

Photo Credit: Alan Levine on Flickr

Nightmare

“It was just a dream,” she told him, stroking his shoulders as he shuddered. “Nothing but a dream.” –The Godless by Ben Peek

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or scene that begins with the line above.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a scary dream you’ve had.

Art Prompt: It was just a dream…

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a funny or scary story about dreams you’ve had.

Photo Credit: Chia-Hsin Ho on Flickr

soporific

soporific  
adjective

  1. causing or tending to cause sleep.
  2. pertaining to or characterized by sleep or sleepiness; sleepy; drowsy.

noun

  1. something that causes sleep, as a medicine or drug.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: What do you do when you are having trouble getting to sleep?

Art Prompt: Soporific

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: Darron Birgenheier on Flickr

dj_andi_baader_20032008

Peter Tripp, a radio DJ, decided to stay awake for 200 hours, broadcasting his regular show at its regular time, as a publicity stunt. Officially, it was a charity drive for the March Of Dimes; Tripp would sit out in a booth in Times Square, and people could pledge money to the cause. It was also a valuable scientific opportunity — knowing that the stunt would take stimulants to stay awake, and knowing that it could be dangerous, the station contacted sleep researchers to monitor Tripp and keep him awake. Researchers took shifts, sitting with Tripp both to make sure he wasn’t in physical danger and to keep him from sleeping.
Amazingly, most of the way through the ordeal, Tripp was able to do his show fairly well. He pulled himself together to keep the DJ patter going. Outside of the show, he deteriorated. After about a hundred hours of wakefulness, Tripp was no longer able to get through simple math problems or recite the alphabet. After 120 hours, he began having hallucinations. He walked into a nearby hotel room to shower and change, and, when he opened a chest of drawers for his clothes, saw flames shooting out of the open drawer. At first he thought that the scientists had set the fire, trying to prank him or make him drop out of the contest. Then he began believing the scientists were in a conspiracy against him, and wanted to frame him for a crime. When one scientist, a stuffy dresser, came up to him, Tripp believed that the man was an undertaker come to bury him, and ran away into the street. –Esther Ingliss-Arkell

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story where sleep deprivation drives the plot.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react when you don’t get enough sleep?

Art Prompt: Sleep deprivation

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the importance of sleep and the health effects of chronic sleep deprivation.

Photo Credit: Mahmut on Flickr