Currently viewing the tag: "storm"

Just before eight o’clock (then about sundown, in that latitude) the cry of “All hands ahoy!” was sounded down the fore scuttle and the after hatchway, and hurrying upon deck, we found a large black cloud rolling on toward us from the south-west, and blackening the whole heavens. “Here comes Cape Horn!” said the chief mate; and we had hardly time to haul down and clew up, before it was upon us. In a few moments, a heavier sea was raised than I had ever seen before, and as it was directly ahead, the little brig, which was no better than a bathing machine, plunged into it, and all the forward part of her was under water; the sea pouring in through the bow-ports and hawse-hole and over the knightheads, threatening to wash everything overboard. In the lee scuppers it was up to a man’s waist. We sprang aloft and double reefed the topsails, and furled all the other sails, and made all snug. But this would not do; the brig was laboring and straining against the head sea, and the gale was growing worse and worse. At the same time sleet and hail were driving with all fury against us. We clewed down, and hauled out the reef-tackles again, and close-reefed the fore-topsail, and furled the main, and hove her to on the starboard tack. Here was an end to our fine prospects. –Before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana Jr.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of involving a ship and a storm..

Journaling Prompt: What is the most frightening weather disaster you’ve lived through.

Art Prompt: Storm at sea

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the true story of a dramatic shipwreck.

The immense volume of water in the five Great Lakes holds heat that allows the lakes to remain relatively warm for much later into the year and postpones the Arctic spread in the region. During the autumn months, two major weather tracks converge over the area. Cold, dry air moves south/southeast from the province of Alberta and northern Canada; warm, moist air moves north/northeast from the Gulf of Mexico, along the lee of the central Rocky Mountains. The collision of these masses forms large storm systems in the middle of the North American continent, including the Great Lakes. When the cold air from these storms moves over the lakes, it is warmed by the waters below and picks up a spin. As the cyclonic system continues over the lakes, its power is intensified by the jet stream above and the warm waters below.

The result is commonly referred to as a “November gale” or “November witch.” Such a storm can maintain hurricane-force wind gusts, produce waves over 50 feet (15 m) high, and dump several inches of rain or feet of snow. Fuelled by the warm lake water, these powerful storms may remain over the Great Lakes for days. Intense winds ravage the lakes and surrounding shores, severely eroding and flooding the shorelines.

November gales have been a bane of the Great Lakes, with at least 25 killer storms striking the region since 1847. During the Big Blow of 1905, 27 wooden vessels were lost. During a November gale in 1975, the giant ore bulk carrier SS Edmund Fitzgerald sank suddenly with all hands, without a distress signal. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set during a November gale on the Great Lakes.
Journaling Prompt: Write about the worst storm you’ve ever weathered.

Art Prompt: Storm at sea

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about a storm on the Great Lakes.

Photo Credit: Great Lakes 1913 Storm Shipwrecks on Wikimedia

tuesday summer rain

Luna anticipated the cold dollops of summer rain, the torrents of water running in the washes, and the scent of the creosote bushes after the storm. She loved to be inside when the giant cloud beings grumbled and heaved their lightening swords onto the earth. –THRESHOLD – A Sky Island Story by Susan Feathers

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene set during a summer thunderstorm.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about thunderstorms?

Art Prompt: Summer Thunderstorm

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about something that happened during a thunderstorm.

Photo Credit: Holly Lay on Flickr

The Great Storm of 1703 arrived from the southwest on 26 November (7 December in today’s calendar). In London, 2,000 chimney stacks collapsed. The New Forest lost 4,000 oaks. Ships were blown hundreds of miles off-course, and over 1,000 seamen died on the Goodwin Sands alone. News-bulletins of casualties and damage were sold all over England – a novelty at that time. The church declared that the storm was God’s vengeance for the sins of the nation. Daniel Defoe thought it was a divine punishment for poor performance against Catholic armies in the War of the Spanish Succession. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a devastating storm.

Journaling Prompt: Why do you think extreme weather happens?

Art Prompt: Storm!

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of how man has attributed weather to various causes.

Photo Credit: Kris Williams on Flickr

Lightning at Mokuti

“Lightning first, then the thunder.” Samantha Hunt, The Invention of Everything Else

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What do you like to do on a stormy day?

Art Prompt: Lightning

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about a stormy day.

Photo Credit: Namibnat on Flickr

blizzard

The night of February fourth, Seattle might as well have been relocated to the North Pole. -Roxanne Bland, The Underground

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a big storm that shut down your regular routine for a while.

Art Prompt: Blizzard

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a humorous story about bad weather you survived.

Photo Credit: Bob Jagendorf
 on Flickr

Dodged a bullet?

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo by Vic on Flickr.

Day 342 / 365 - Rainstorm

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo by anitakhart on Flickr.