Currently viewing the tag: "troll"

Just outside of the tiny town of Vik, whose population hovers just above 300, lies the famed black pebble beach called Reynisfjara. Towering, hexagonal basalt columns rise from the dark sand at the base of Reynisfjell Mountain, and 216-foot rock pillars called Reynisdrangar jut out of the turbulent North Atlantic Ocean just off the coast.

According to Icelandic folklore, these pillars actually used to be trolls. While dragging a three-mast ship towards land, the trolls were taking too long to reach the shore, and at the break of dawn were instantly turned to stone. Even today, it is believed that if you drive near by the cliffs you can hear their wails and moans, as they long for their home in the mountains. –The Eerie Folktales Behind Iceland’s Natural Wonders by Austa Somvichian-Clausen

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of the trolls before they were turned into stone.

Journaling Prompt: What is your favorite story about living beings turned into stones? What is it that appeals to you about this story?

Art Prompt: Trolls

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about a local legend.

Photo Credit: Christian Rüfli on Flickr

The Hunderfossen Troll

In the Scandinavian countries simple folk have a vivid sense of the nearness of the supernatural on Christmas Eve. On Yule night no one should go out, for he may meet uncanny beings of all kinds. In Sweden the Trolls are believed to celebrate Christmas Eve with dancing and revelry. –Christmas in Ritual and Tradition, Christian and Pagan by Clement A. Miles

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story, poem, or haiku about trolls dancing on Christmas Eve.

Journaling Prompt: Write about how your family spent Christmas Eve when you were a child.

Art Prompt: Dancing Trolls on Christmas Eve

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a touching story about a holiday tradition in your family.

Photo Credit: Jan Hammershaug on Flickr