Currently viewing the tag: "water"

In 1848, when news of the Gold Rush began spreading, people were so desperate to get to California that all sorts of dubious vessels were pressed into service, Everett says. On arrival, ship captains found no waiting cargo or passengers to justify a return journey—and besides, they and their crew were eager to try their own luck in the gold fields…

Sometimes the ships were put to other uses. The most famous example is the whaling ship Niantic, which was intentionally run aground in 1849 and used as a warehouse, saloon, and hotel before it burned down in a huge fire in 1851 that claimed many other ships in the cove. A hotel was later built atop the remnants of the Niantic at the corner of Clay and Sansome streets, about six blocks from the current shoreline. –New Map Reveals Ships Buried Below San Francisco by Greg Miller

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of an abandoned ship.

Journaling Prompt: Write about something you left behind that you wish you still had.

Art Prompt: Abandoned ship

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about the California Gold Rush.

Photo Credit: Whaleship Niantic on Wikimedia

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
The vine still clings to the mouldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,
And the day is dark and dreary.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “The Rainy Day

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or scene set on a rainy day.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel on rainy days?

Art Prompt: Rainy Day

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story set on a rainy day.

Photo Credit: Kate on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Chiricahua Mountains Arizona on Wikimedia

Nearly swamping a French trawler, the White Star Lines flagship RMS Titanic pulled away from its last ever contact with land at Queenstown in Ireland on the afternoon of April 11, 1912. –Caldwell Andrew, Their Last Suppers: Legends of History and Their Final Meals

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set on a doomed ship.

Journaling Prompt: Write about someone you lost to a tragic accident.

Art Prompt: Titanic

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a true story set on the Titanic.

Photo Credit: Chris Gafford on Flickr

The immense volume of water in the five Great Lakes holds heat that allows the lakes to remain relatively warm for much later into the year and postpones the Arctic spread in the region. During the autumn months, two major weather tracks converge over the area. Cold, dry air moves south/southeast from the province of Alberta and northern Canada; warm, moist air moves north/northeast from the Gulf of Mexico, along the lee of the central Rocky Mountains. The collision of these masses forms large storm systems in the middle of the North American continent, including the Great Lakes. When the cold air from these storms moves over the lakes, it is warmed by the waters below and picks up a spin. As the cyclonic system continues over the lakes, its power is intensified by the jet stream above and the warm waters below.

The result is commonly referred to as a “November gale” or “November witch.” Such a storm can maintain hurricane-force wind gusts, produce waves over 50 feet (15 m) high, and dump several inches of rain or feet of snow. Fuelled by the warm lake water, these powerful storms may remain over the Great Lakes for days. Intense winds ravage the lakes and surrounding shores, severely eroding and flooding the shorelines.

November gales have been a bane of the Great Lakes, with at least 25 killer storms striking the region since 1847. During the Big Blow of 1905, 27 wooden vessels were lost. During a November gale in 1975, the giant ore bulk carrier SS Edmund Fitzgerald sank suddenly with all hands, without a distress signal. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set during a November gale on the Great Lakes.
Journaling Prompt: Write about the worst storm you’ve ever weathered.

Art Prompt: Storm at sea

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about a storm on the Great Lakes.

Photo Credit: Great Lakes 1913 Storm Shipwrecks on Wikimedia

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Stift Zwettl Kreuzgang Brunnenhaus on Wikimedia

On the hottest day of July, trolling in dead-calm waters near Key West, a tourist named James Mayberry reeled up a human arm. –Bad Monkey by Carl Hiaasen

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What is the strangest thing you’ve ever caught?

Art Prompt: Trolling

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a fish story.

Photo Credit: anoldent on Flickr

What’s happening in Siberia’s thawing permafrost and Greenland’s melting glaciers sounds borderline supernatural. Ancient viruses, bacteria, plants, and even animals have been cryogenically frozen there for millennia—and now, they are waking up. –After Thousands of Years, Earth’s Frozen Life Forms Are Waking Up by Maddie Stone

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about an ancient virus set free by the melting ice.

Journaling Prompt: What do you think will be the worst thing that happens as the ice melts?

Art Prompt: Global warming

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about global warming and what you believe about it.

Photo Credit: xxx on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

On November 20, the crew sighted a huge male sperm whale leading a pod. Three small whaling boats were launched under the command of the captain and the ship’s two mates. They had soon managed to corral several of the whales when a calf smashed into Chase’s boat forcing him to return to the main ship. It was then that the young cabin boy Nickerson spotted a looming shape underneath the bow of the Essex. It was a mighty sperm whale some 85 feet long, weighing as much as 80 tons.

First mate Owen Chase wrote later how he saw the whale “appear with ten-fold fury and vengeance in his aspect. The surf flew in all directions about him with the continual violent thrashing of his tail. His head about half out of the water, and in that way he came upon us, and again struck the ship … I could distinctly see him smite his jaws together as if distracted with rage and fury.”

The huge creature smashed into the Essex repeatedly, on each occasion causing it to list even more. The men just had time to save some of the provisions and regroup in three small whaling boats before their ship succumbed to the waves. “My God, Mr. Chase, what is the matter?” Captain Pollard asked in utter shock. “We have been stove by a whale,” came the bitter reply. –This Real-Life Whaling Disaster Inspired ‘Moby-Dick’ By Xabier Armenda´riz

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a huge disaster that is inspired by a true story.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the biggest disaster in your life and what you learned from surviving it.

Art Prompt: Whales

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about using real-life events to inspire creativity.

Photo Credit: Walfang zwischen 1856 und 1907 on Wikimedia