Currently viewing the tag: "water"

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Photo Credit: Stift Zwettl Kreuzgang Brunnenhaus on Wikimedia

On the hottest day of July, trolling in dead-calm waters near Key West, a tourist named James Mayberry reeled up a human arm. –Bad Monkey by Carl Hiaasen

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the first line of the week as the starting point or inspiration for a scene, story, poem, or haiku.

Journaling Prompt: What is the strangest thing you’ve ever caught?

Art Prompt: Trolling

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a fish story.

Photo Credit: anoldent on Flickr

What’s happening in Siberia’s thawing permafrost and Greenland’s melting glaciers sounds borderline supernatural. Ancient viruses, bacteria, plants, and even animals have been cryogenically frozen there for millennia—and now, they are waking up. –After Thousands of Years, Earth’s Frozen Life Forms Are Waking Up by Maddie Stone

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about an ancient virus set free by the melting ice.

Journaling Prompt: What do you think will be the worst thing that happens as the ice melts?

Art Prompt: Global warming

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about global warming and what you believe about it.

Photo Credit: xxx on Flickr

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On November 20, the crew sighted a huge male sperm whale leading a pod. Three small whaling boats were launched under the command of the captain and the ship’s two mates. They had soon managed to corral several of the whales when a calf smashed into Chase’s boat forcing him to return to the main ship. It was then that the young cabin boy Nickerson spotted a looming shape underneath the bow of the Essex. It was a mighty sperm whale some 85 feet long, weighing as much as 80 tons.

First mate Owen Chase wrote later how he saw the whale “appear with ten-fold fury and vengeance in his aspect. The surf flew in all directions about him with the continual violent thrashing of his tail. His head about half out of the water, and in that way he came upon us, and again struck the ship … I could distinctly see him smite his jaws together as if distracted with rage and fury.”

The huge creature smashed into the Essex repeatedly, on each occasion causing it to list even more. The men just had time to save some of the provisions and regroup in three small whaling boats before their ship succumbed to the waves. “My God, Mr. Chase, what is the matter?” Captain Pollard asked in utter shock. “We have been stove by a whale,” came the bitter reply. –This Real-Life Whaling Disaster Inspired ‘Moby-Dick’ By Xabier Armenda´riz

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a huge disaster that is inspired by a true story.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the biggest disaster in your life and what you learned from surviving it.

Art Prompt: Whales

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about using real-life events to inspire creativity.

Photo Credit: Walfang zwischen 1856 und 1907 on Wikimedia

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Lynne Cox made history by being the first person to swim across the Bering Strait. But her 2.3-mile (3.7-kilometer) swim was also notable because she crossed the border between the former U.S.S.R. and the United States. This was in 1987, during the Cold War.

Thankfully, she received a warm welcome when she finished the swim. A Soviet delegation greeted her, and both Mikhail Gorbachev and Ronald Reagan later toasted when they met to sign a nuclear weapons treaty.

“Lynne Cox is known not just for distance swimming, but for swimming in unbelievably cold and open water,” Bier says. When Cox swam the Bering Strait, the water temperatures hovered around freezing (39°F, 4°C). Years later, she used her cold-water training to swim in Antarctica. –Six Epic Swims, From the English Channel to the Gowanus Canal by Becky Little

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of someone who undertakes a risky challenge.

Journaling Prompt: What is the most brave thing you’ve ever tried.

Art Prompt: Ocean swimmer

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of Lynne Cox’ history-making swim.

Photo Credit: US NOAA nautical chart of Bering Strait on Wikimedia

thurs-ice

She came to a place where the stream flowed over a terrace of rock, from one level of moor down to another, and there a small pool had carved itself into the rock just beneath the rapids. The water fell less than a meter, and the stream was narrow enough to jump: but she remembered that stream and that pool because there in the circling water, caught beneath the splashing rapids, floated a frozen circle of foam. The water was naturally soft and peaty, and a yellow-white foam sometimes formed in the mountain streams of that area, blown by the winds and caught in the reeds, but she had never seen it collected into a circle like that and frozen. She laughed when she saw it. She waded in and carefully picked it up. It was only a little greater in diameter than the distance between her outstretched thumb and little finger and a few centimeters thick, not as fragile as she had at first feared. The frothy bubbles had frozen in the cold air and almost freezing water, making what looked like a tiny model of a galaxy: a fairly common spiral galaxy, like this one, like hers. She held the light confection of air and water and suspended chemicals and turned it over in her hands, sniffing it, sticking her tongue out and licking it, looking at the dim winter sun through it, flicking her finger to see if it would ring. She watched her little rime galaxy start to melt, very slowly, and saw her own breath blow across it, a brief image of her warmth in the air. Finally she put it back where she had found it, slowly revolving in the pool of water at the base of the small rapids. The galaxy image had occurred to her then, and she thought at the time about the similarity of the forces which shaped both the little and the vast. She had thought, And which is really the most important? but then felt embarrassed to have thought such a thing. Every now and again, though, she went back to that thought, and knew that each was exactly as important as the other. –Consider Phlebas by Iain M. Banks

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a scene set in nature and focus on description.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the most inspiring moment you have experienced in nature.

Art Prompt: A galaxy in your hand

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story about a time when nature revealed its deeper secrets to you.

Photo Credit: Tim Parkin on Flickr

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Mutiny_on_the_Bounty mondy

The mutiny on the Royal Navy vessel HMS Bounty occurred in the south Pacific on 28 April 1789. Disaffected crewmen, led by Acting Lieutenant Fletcher Christian, seized control of the ship from their captain, Lieutenant William Bligh, and set him and 18 loyalists adrift in the ship’s open launch. The mutineers variously settled on Tahiti or on Pitcairn Island. Bligh meanwhile completed a voyage of more than 3,500 nautical miles (6,500 km; 4,000 mi) in the launch to reach safety, and began the process of bringing the mutineers to justice.

Bounty had left England in 1787 on a mission to collect and transport breadfruit plants from Tahiti to the West Indies. A five-month layover in Tahiti, during which many of the men lived ashore and formed relationships with native Polynesians, proved harmful to discipline. Relations between Bligh and his crew deteriorated after he began handing out increasingly harsh punishments, criticism and abuse, Christian being a particular target. After three weeks back at sea, Christian and others forced Bligh from the ship. Twenty-five men remained on board afterwards, including loyalists held against their will and others for whom there was no room in the launch.

After Bligh reached England in April 1790, the Admiralty despatched HMS Pandora to apprehend the mutineers. Fourteen were captured in Tahiti and imprisoned on board Pandora, which then searched without success for Christian’s party that had hidden on Pitcairn Island. After turning back toward England Pandora ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef, with the loss of 31 crew and 4 prisoners from Bounty. The 10 surviving detainees reached England in June 1792 and were court martialled; 4 were acquitted, 3 were pardoned, and 3 were hanged. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set during any part of the story of the Bounty or create a mutiny in your own story.

Journaling Prompt: Write about a time when you felt like mutinying.

Art Prompt: Mutiny!

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of a famous mutiny.

ColonelEverest

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