Currently viewing the tag: "water"

They came out of the tangled forest into the clearing with its ruins and waterfall. The falls’ spill down the high cliffs was soft in this season. Instead of churning the water, it merely spread and rippled around the cliff. The broad pool had a dark, almost black sheen, like sheets of best-quality silk dyed to the color of a moonless night. –Kate Elliott, Traitors’ Gate

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set in the place described above.

Journaling Prompt: Write about the most beautiful wild place you’ve ever visited.

Art Prompt: Waterfall and ruins

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the story of a hike you went on, paying particular attention to description that engages as many senses as possible.

Photo Credit: Oregon Department of Agriculture on Flickr

The Sunday Times Golden Globe Race was a non-stop, single-handed, round-the-world yacht race, held in 1968–1969, and was the first round-the-world yacht race. The race was controversial due to the failure of most competitors to finish the race and because of the suicide of one entrant; however, it ultimately led to the founding of the BOC Challenge and Vendée Globe round-the-world races, both of which continue to be successful and popular.

The race was sponsored by the British Sunday Times newspaper and was designed to capitalise on a number of individual round-the-world voyages which were already being planned by various sailors; for this reason, there were no qualification requirements, and competitors were offered the opportunity to join and permitted to start at any time between 1 June and 31 October 1968. The Golden Globe trophy was offered to the first person to complete an unassisted, non-stop single-handed circumnavigation of the world via the great capes, and a separate £5,000 prize was offered for the fastest single-handed circumnavigation.

Nine sailors started the race; four retired before leaving the Atlantic Ocean. Of the five remaining, Chay Blyth, who had set off with absolutely no sailing experience, sailed past the Cape of Good Hope before retiring; Nigel Tetley sank with 1,100 nautical miles (2,000 km) to go while leading; Donald Crowhurst, who, in desperation, attempted to fake a round-the-world voyage to avoid financial ruin, began to show signs of mental illness, and then committed suicide; and Bernard Moitessier, who rejected the philosophy behind a commercialised competition, abandoned the race while in a strong position to win and kept sailing non-stop until he reached Tahiti after circling the globe one and a half times. Robin Knox-Johnston was the only entrant to complete the race, becoming the first person to sail single-handed and non-stop around the world. He was awarded both prizes, and later donated the £5,000 to a fund supporting Crowhurst’s family. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a competition that must be completed singlehandedly and alone against great odds.

Journaling Prompt: What is the most challenging thing you’ve ever attempted alone? Write about the challenges you overcame.

Art Prompt: Yacht race

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about a person who overcame isolation and the elements and emerged triumphant.

Photo Credit: GoldenGlobeRaceRoute on Wikimedia

Just before eight o’clock (then about sundown, in that latitude) the cry of “All hands ahoy!” was sounded down the fore scuttle and the after hatchway, and hurrying upon deck, we found a large black cloud rolling on toward us from the south-west, and blackening the whole heavens. “Here comes Cape Horn!” said the chief mate; and we had hardly time to haul down and clew up, before it was upon us. In a few moments, a heavier sea was raised than I had ever seen before, and as it was directly ahead, the little brig, which was no better than a bathing machine, plunged into it, and all the forward part of her was under water; the sea pouring in through the bow-ports and hawse-hole and over the knightheads, threatening to wash everything overboard. In the lee scuppers it was up to a man’s waist. We sprang aloft and double reefed the topsails, and furled all the other sails, and made all snug. But this would not do; the brig was laboring and straining against the head sea, and the gale was growing worse and worse. At the same time sleet and hail were driving with all fury against us. We clewed down, and hauled out the reef-tackles again, and close-reefed the fore-topsail, and furled the main, and hove her to on the starboard tack. Here was an end to our fine prospects. –Before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana Jr.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of involving a ship and a storm..

Journaling Prompt: What is the most frightening weather disaster you’ve lived through.

Art Prompt: Storm at sea

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the true story of a dramatic shipwreck.

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: nightlife on Big Happy Fun House

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Tromsø 2013 06 05 2380 on Wikimedia

potable
  • Fit to drink; suitable for drinking; drinkable.
  • A potable liquid; a beverage, especially an alcoholic beverage.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Use the word of the week in whatever you write today.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel about drinking water? Do you take it for granted? Do you enjoy drinking it? Write about water.

Art Prompt: Drinking water

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt:Use the word of the week in your article or speech.

Photo Credit: David Fulmer on Flickr

They say cancer runs in the family. In our family, it doesn’t run so much as chase. It caught my mom the year I turned thirty. I feel like I became her as I watched summer sweat drip from my own nose, her turn to shiver beneath a blanket, crooked ruts in the sand stretching behind us toward the boardwalk. –Hugh Howey, The Shell Collector

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story involving beach memories.

Journaling Prompt: What do you think about when you picture a beach?

Art Prompt: Beach

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about how places become associated with pivotal times in our lives.

Photo Credit: Michael L. on Flickr

In 1848, when news of the Gold Rush began spreading, people were so desperate to get to California that all sorts of dubious vessels were pressed into service, Everett says. On arrival, ship captains found no waiting cargo or passengers to justify a return journey—and besides, they and their crew were eager to try their own luck in the gold fields…

Sometimes the ships were put to other uses. The most famous example is the whaling ship Niantic, which was intentionally run aground in 1849 and used as a warehouse, saloon, and hotel before it burned down in a huge fire in 1851 that claimed many other ships in the cove. A hotel was later built atop the remnants of the Niantic at the corner of Clay and Sansome streets, about six blocks from the current shoreline. –New Map Reveals Ships Buried Below San Francisco by Greg Miller

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of an abandoned ship.

Journaling Prompt: Write about something you left behind that you wish you still had.

Art Prompt: Abandoned ship

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about the California Gold Rush.

Photo Credit: Whaleship Niantic on Wikimedia

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
The vine still clings to the mouldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,
And the day is dark and dreary.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “The Rainy Day

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story or scene set on a rainy day.

Journaling Prompt: How do you feel on rainy days?

Art Prompt: Rainy Day

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story set on a rainy day.

Photo Credit: Kate on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Chiricahua Mountains Arizona on Wikimedia