Currently viewing the tag: "weather"

The Sunday Times Golden Globe Race was a non-stop, single-handed, round-the-world yacht race, held in 1968–1969, and was the first round-the-world yacht race. The race was controversial due to the failure of most competitors to finish the race and because of the suicide of one entrant; however, it ultimately led to the founding of the BOC Challenge and Vendée Globe round-the-world races, both of which continue to be successful and popular.

The race was sponsored by the British Sunday Times newspaper and was designed to capitalise on a number of individual round-the-world voyages which were already being planned by various sailors; for this reason, there were no qualification requirements, and competitors were offered the opportunity to join and permitted to start at any time between 1 June and 31 October 1968. The Golden Globe trophy was offered to the first person to complete an unassisted, non-stop single-handed circumnavigation of the world via the great capes, and a separate £5,000 prize was offered for the fastest single-handed circumnavigation.

Nine sailors started the race; four retired before leaving the Atlantic Ocean. Of the five remaining, Chay Blyth, who had set off with absolutely no sailing experience, sailed past the Cape of Good Hope before retiring; Nigel Tetley sank with 1,100 nautical miles (2,000 km) to go while leading; Donald Crowhurst, who, in desperation, attempted to fake a round-the-world voyage to avoid financial ruin, began to show signs of mental illness, and then committed suicide; and Bernard Moitessier, who rejected the philosophy behind a commercialised competition, abandoned the race while in a strong position to win and kept sailing non-stop until he reached Tahiti after circling the globe one and a half times. Robin Knox-Johnston was the only entrant to complete the race, becoming the first person to sail single-handed and non-stop around the world. He was awarded both prizes, and later donated the £5,000 to a fund supporting Crowhurst’s family. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about a competition that must be completed singlehandedly and alone against great odds.

Journaling Prompt: What is the most challenging thing you’ve ever attempted alone? Write about the challenges you overcame.

Art Prompt: Yacht race

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about a person who overcame isolation and the elements and emerged triumphant.

Photo Credit: GoldenGlobeRaceRoute on Wikimedia

Just before eight o’clock (then about sundown, in that latitude) the cry of “All hands ahoy!” was sounded down the fore scuttle and the after hatchway, and hurrying upon deck, we found a large black cloud rolling on toward us from the south-west, and blackening the whole heavens. “Here comes Cape Horn!” said the chief mate; and we had hardly time to haul down and clew up, before it was upon us. In a few moments, a heavier sea was raised than I had ever seen before, and as it was directly ahead, the little brig, which was no better than a bathing machine, plunged into it, and all the forward part of her was under water; the sea pouring in through the bow-ports and hawse-hole and over the knightheads, threatening to wash everything overboard. In the lee scuppers it was up to a man’s waist. We sprang aloft and double reefed the topsails, and furled all the other sails, and made all snug. But this would not do; the brig was laboring and straining against the head sea, and the gale was growing worse and worse. At the same time sleet and hail were driving with all fury against us. We clewed down, and hauled out the reef-tackles again, and close-reefed the fore-topsail, and furled the main, and hove her to on the starboard tack. Here was an end to our fine prospects. –Before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana Jr.

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of involving a ship and a storm..

Journaling Prompt: What is the most frightening weather disaster you’ve lived through.

Art Prompt: Storm at sea

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience the true story of a dramatic shipwreck.

Spring was moving in the air above and in the earth below and around him, penetrating even his dark and lowly little house with its spirit of divine discontent and longing. It was small wonder, then, that he suddenly flung down his brush on the floor, said ‘Bother!’ and ‘O blow!’ and also ‘Hang spring-cleaning!’ and bolted out of the house without even waiting to put on his coat. –Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story in which weather drives the action.

Journaling Prompt: What distracts you from doing what you know you should do?

Art Prompt: Spring Cleaning

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a story about a spring adventure.

Photo Credit: SpiderMonkeyDerp on Flickr

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: drugs on Big Happy Fun House

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: La Sacra ammantata dalla neve on Wikimedia

The immense volume of water in the five Great Lakes holds heat that allows the lakes to remain relatively warm for much later into the year and postpones the Arctic spread in the region. During the autumn months, two major weather tracks converge over the area. Cold, dry air moves south/southeast from the province of Alberta and northern Canada; warm, moist air moves north/northeast from the Gulf of Mexico, along the lee of the central Rocky Mountains. The collision of these masses forms large storm systems in the middle of the North American continent, including the Great Lakes. When the cold air from these storms moves over the lakes, it is warmed by the waters below and picks up a spin. As the cyclonic system continues over the lakes, its power is intensified by the jet stream above and the warm waters below.

The result is commonly referred to as a “November gale” or “November witch.” Such a storm can maintain hurricane-force wind gusts, produce waves over 50 feet (15 m) high, and dump several inches of rain or feet of snow. Fuelled by the warm lake water, these powerful storms may remain over the Great Lakes for days. Intense winds ravage the lakes and surrounding shores, severely eroding and flooding the shorelines.

November gales have been a bane of the Great Lakes, with at least 25 killer storms striking the region since 1847. During the Big Blow of 1905, 27 wooden vessels were lost. During a November gale in 1975, the giant ore bulk carrier SS Edmund Fitzgerald sank suddenly with all hands, without a distress signal. –Wikipedia

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set during a November gale on the Great Lakes.
Journaling Prompt: Write about the worst storm you’ve ever weathered.

Art Prompt: Storm at sea

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience a dramatic story about a storm on the Great Lakes.

Photo Credit: Great Lakes 1913 Storm Shipwrecks on Wikimedia

The American Geophysical Union (AGU) reported on January 18, 2017 that electricity blackouts from an extreme space weather event – generated by a super-storm on the sun – could cost the U.S. up to $40 billion daily, or more. The AGU journal Space Weather published a new study on this subject, which indicates that more than half the financial loss would happen outside the blackout zone. –$40 billion a day for solar super-storms by Deborah Byrd

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story set in a day when all the electricity goes out due to a solar storm.

Journaling Prompt: How do you react to the loss of electricity?

Art Prompt: Solar storm

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about the dangers of an extreme space weather event.

Photo Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Flickr

What’s happening in Siberia’s thawing permafrost and Greenland’s melting glaciers sounds borderline supernatural. Ancient viruses, bacteria, plants, and even animals have been cryogenically frozen there for millennia—and now, they are waking up. –After Thousands of Years, Earth’s Frozen Life Forms Are Waking Up by Maddie Stone

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write a story about an ancient virus set free by the melting ice.

Journaling Prompt: What do you think will be the worst thing that happens as the ice melts?

Art Prompt: Global warming

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell your audience about global warming and what you believe about it.

Photo Credit: xxx on Flickr

spring

Create whatever this visual prompt inspires in you!

Photo Credit: Bernhard Friess on Flickr

thurs thunder storm

A spectacular thunderstorm raged like battling dragons outside. We didn’t even try to sleep. We sat in the kitchen across from each other, hands cradling mugs of hot chocolate. Rick had put marshmallows in it, and whipped cream, and just enough cinnamon to give off a delicious scent –Mom and Dad at the Homefront by Sherwood Smith

Fiction Writing Prompt: Write the story of a family waiting out a storm.

Journaling Prompt: What does your family do when the lights go out during a storm?

Art Prompt: Hot cocoa

Non-Fiction / Speechwriting Prompt: Tell a dramatic story about a storm you survived with your family.

Photo Credit: Saša Mutić on Flickr